Curated News: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

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Newswise: Long-Term Study Reaffirms Benefits of Covid-19 Vaccination for Organ Transplant Recipients
Released: 18-Aug-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Long-Term Study Reaffirms Benefits of Covid-19 Vaccination for Organ Transplant Recipients
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A two-year study found that spikes of post-vaccination SARS-CoV-2 viral infections (commonly known as COVID-19 breakthrough cases) remain common, yet hospitalization rates have dramatically dropped following the first wave of the virus’ omicron subvariant.

Newswise: Immune cells present long before infection predict flu symptoms
Released: 17-Aug-2023 12:35 PM EDT
Immune cells present long before infection predict flu symptoms
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists found that immune cells present in individuals long before influenza infection predict whether the illness is symptomatic.

Newswise: UTSW finds potential key to predict immunotherapy toxicity
Released: 14-Aug-2023 11:50 AM EDT
UTSW finds potential key to predict immunotherapy toxicity
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a novel parameter of T cells that could help oncologists anticipate which patients would be most likely to develop immunotherapy toxicity. The findings, published in the Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, could lead to improved treatments for a variety of cancers.

Released: 9-Aug-2023 10:20 AM EDT
Academic-private partnership aims to reduce toxic effects of deadly digestive bacteria
Virginia Tech

The bacterium commonly referred to as C. diff is sometimes called “C-difficult” because it is so hard to treat, said Mohamed Seleem, director of the Center for One Health Research. Seleem and Nectagen Inc. have received a nearly $275,000 grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to study whether synthetic proteins developed by Nectagen can reduce the toxicity of the digestive bacteria.

Newswise: Alternative cellular ‘fuels’ boost immunity
Released: 28-Jul-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Alternative cellular ‘fuels’ boost immunity
Van Andel Institute

A metabolic by-product that is more prevalent during fasting may supercharge immune cells as they fight infection and disease, reports an early stage study by Van Andel Institute scientists and collaborators.

Newswise: Study explores how often children diagnosed with flu experience serious neuropsychiatric side effects
Released: 24-Jul-2023 11:40 AM EDT
Study explores how often children diagnosed with flu experience serious neuropsychiatric side effects
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

While the incidence of influenza-associated neuropsychiatric events in children in the United States is unknown, the controversy over the use of a common antiviral medication typically administered to treat flu in children has sparked concern among parents and medical professionals alike. The dilemma about whether the treatment causes neuropsychiatric events or if the infection itself is the culprit, led a group of pediatric researchers at Monroe Carell Jr.

Released: 21-Jul-2023 10:00 AM EDT
ASBMB expresses concerns on proposed NIH budget cuts
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

ASBMB publishes a statement expressing concerns for NIH budget cuts outlined by a House Labor HHS funding bill that could lead to lost jobs and halted research progress

   
Newswise: New Community Partnership Model Boosts Inclusion of Participants into HIV Cure-Directed Research
Released: 19-Jul-2023 12:05 PM EDT
New Community Partnership Model Boosts Inclusion of Participants into HIV Cure-Directed Research
Wistar Institute

Scientists have long used community advisory boards to engage communities and provide feedback on studies, but this model has limitations. Now, Wistar Institute researchers are sharing how a more inclusive model for community engagement can lead to deeper insights and greater community participation in HIV research.

   
Released: 14-Jul-2023 4:05 PM EDT
Virginia Tech awarded grant to study lingering Lyme disease symptoms
Virginia Tech

An estimated 1,200 Americans, on average, are diagnosed with Lyme disease each day. Some of those patients continue to experience negative effects, even after treatment. Lyme disease researcher Brandon Jutras, associate professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and affiliated faculty of the Fralin Life Sciences Institute, recently received a $2.

Newswise:Video Embedded proteins-predict-significant-step-toward-development-of-diabetes
VIDEO
28-Jun-2023 3:00 PM EDT
Proteins Predict Significant Step Toward Development of Diabetes
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Scientists have taken an important step forward in predicting who will develop Type 1 diabetes months before symptoms appear.

Released: 28-Jun-2023 3:05 PM EDT
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Researchers Awarded $15.1 Million Grant to Explore Immune Rejection of Transplanted Organs
Mount Sinai Health System

Striving to improve organ transplant survival rates, internationally renowned researchers in immunology and bioengineering at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have received $15.1 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to lead a novel, five-year multi-center research program that will explore trained immunity—the innate immune system’s ability to remember infections and other insults—as a target for preventing organ transplant rejection.

Newswise: CDI Lab Earns Grant to Re-engineer Drugs to Combat Emerging Infections
Released: 22-Jun-2023 12:05 PM EDT
CDI Lab Earns Grant to Re-engineer Drugs to Combat Emerging Infections
Hackensack Meridian Health

A laboratory at the Hackensack Meridian Center for Discovery and Innovation (CDI) has been issued a major grant to repurpose drugs to combat non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), an emerging family of germs naturally found in soil and water and which can be deadly to those with compromised immune systems and pre-existing lung diseases.

Released: 13-Jun-2023 7:50 PM EDT
People who preserve ‘immune resilience’ live longer, resist infections
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, working with collaborators in five countries, today revealed that the capacity to resist or recover from infections and other sources of inflammatory stress — called “immune resilience” — differs widely among individuals.

Released: 13-Jun-2023 2:55 PM EDT
CHOP Researchers Develop Universal MHC Molecules that Can be Produced Rapidly at Scale
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have engineered stable, universal MHC-I molecules that can be produced rapidly at scale, allowing researchers not only to develop vaccines and immunotherapies more quickly but also to identify molecules that can work broadly across the population. The findings were published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Newswise: Family resemblance: How T cells could fight many coronaviruses at once
Released: 1-Jun-2023 3:00 PM EDT
Family resemblance: How T cells could fight many coronaviruses at once
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology show that T cells can recognize several different viral targets, called "antigens," shared between most coronaviruses, including common cold coronaviruses and SARS-CoV-2. They also looked more in-depth at what fragments of these antigens, called “epitopes,” are recognized and how conserved they are across different coronaviruses.

Released: 18-May-2023 1:25 PM EDT
Dr. Anthony Fauci to Receive Honorary Degree at USU Commencement
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) will confer an honorary Doctor of Science degree to former director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Dr. Anthony Fauci on May 21, Armed Forces Day, during the University’s commencement ceremony.

Released: 10-May-2023 8:10 AM EDT
AI helps create better, simpler hepatitis, COVID-19 tests
University of Florida

Going beyond pregnancy and COVID-19, the world could someday soon come to rely on at-home tests for many diseases thanks in part to AI-fueled improvements.

   
Released: 1-May-2023 3:05 PM EDT
Advanced Photon Source powers the search for broadly effective coronavirus antibody treatment
Argonne National Laboratory

Researchers have used Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source to characterize a set of broadly neutralizing antibodies effective against a wide range of coronaviruses.

   
Released: 13-Apr-2023 7:35 PM EDT
The potential and challenges of mucosal COVID-19 vaccines
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

In November 2022, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) co-hosted a virtual workshop on the importance and challenges of developing mucosal vaccines for SARS-COV-2. The highlights of this workshop have now been published as a report in npj Vaccines.

Released: 11-Apr-2023 11:05 AM EDT
$9.5M to fund cross-disciplinary chronic fatigue research
Cornell University

A Cornell multidisciplinary research center that studies chronic fatigue syndrome has received a five-year, $9.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease – funding that will enable experts from disparate fields to work together on the mysterious and debilitating condition.

3-Apr-2023 3:30 PM EDT
CHOP-led Study Identifies Two Different Regulatory T Cell Populations
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

A regulatory class of human T cells descends from two different origins, one that relates to autoimmunity and one that relates to protective immunity, according to a new study led by Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The findings, published today in Science Immunology, could pave the way for new treatments for autoimmune diseases that target the immune system selectively.

3-Apr-2023 3:00 PM EDT
CHOP Researchers Reveal Complex Assembly Process Involved in DNA Virus Replication
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

In a twist on the question, “Which came first, the chicken or the egg?”, scientists have long faced a similar question about how human adenovirus replicates: “Which comes first, assembly of the viral particle, or packaging of the viral genome?” Now, in a new study published today in Nature, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have answered that question, showing that viral proteins use a process called phase separation to coordinate production of viral progeny.

Newswise: Center for AIDS Research Receives $15 Million Renewal Grant From NIH
Released: 3-Apr-2023 2:00 PM EDT
Center for AIDS Research Receives $15 Million Renewal Grant From NIH
University of California San Diego

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has awarded a five-year, $15.45 million grant to the San Diego Center for AIDS Research at UC San Diego, renewing support that extends back to an original establishing grant in 1994 at the height of the AIDS epidemic.

Newswise:Video Embedded we-ve-learned-a-lot-from-lymphocytic-choriomeningitis-virus-now-the-time-has-come-to-fight-it
VIDEO
Released: 28-Mar-2023 3:25 PM EDT
We've learned a lot from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus—now the time has come to fight it
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

There are no vaccines or therapies available for lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection. This pathogen spreads easily and is extremely common in people worldwide.

   
Newswise: Can Controlling Retinoic Acid be a Key to Preventing Infections in the Gut?
Released: 28-Mar-2023 1:55 PM EDT
Can Controlling Retinoic Acid be a Key to Preventing Infections in the Gut?
Stony Brook University

A team of scientists from the Renaissance School of Medicine (RSOM) at Stony Brook University have identified a distinct role of retinoic acid, a metabolite of vitamin A, during the immune response of the gut.

Released: 23-Mar-2023 4:25 PM EDT
Hidden 'super spreaders' spur dengue fever transmission
Emory University

For mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue fever, the abundance of the insects in places where people gather has long served as the main barometer for infection risk. A new study, however, suggests that the number of “hidden” infections tied to a place, or cases of infected people who show no symptoms, is the key indicator for dengue risk.

Released: 23-Mar-2023 12:25 PM EDT
World TB Day: Rutgers Is Awarded $20 Million to Lead Consortium of Seven Universities and Eight Nations to Curb Tuberculosis
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School will receive $20 million over five years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, to coordinate research being conducted in eight nations on tuberculosis (TB) control and prevention.

Newswise: SARS-CoV-2 infection weakens immune-cell response to vaccination
Released: 20-Mar-2023 3:25 PM EDT
SARS-CoV-2 infection weakens immune-cell response to vaccination
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

The magnitude and quality of a key immune cell’s response to vaccination with two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine were considerably lower in people with prior SARS-CoV-2 infection compared to people without prior infection, a study has found.

14-Mar-2023 2:15 PM EDT
Bird Flu Associated with Hundreds of Seal Deaths in New England in 2022, Tufts Researchers Find
Tufts University

Researchers at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University found that an outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was associated with the deaths of more than 330 New England harbor and gray seals along the North Atlantic coast in June and July 2022, and the outbreak was connected to a wave of avian influenza in birds in the region.

Released: 3-Mar-2023 3:40 PM EST
“COVID rebound” is common, even in untreated patients
Scripps Research Institute

“COVID rebound,” in which evidence of the illness disappears and then returns days or weeks later, is surprisingly common—whether or not patients are given the antiviral Paxlovid.

21-Feb-2023 3:20 PM EST
CHOP Researchers Identify Molecules that Optimize Immune Presentation of Antigens across the Human Population
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified variants of a chaperone molecule that optimizes the binding and presentation of foreign antigens across the human population, which could open the door to numerous applications where robust presentation to the immune system is important, including cell therapy and immunization. The findings were published today in Science Advances.

Newswise: Two new papers demonstrate use of Outbreak.info as one-stop online source for COVID data
Released: 23-Feb-2023 5:45 PM EST
Two new papers demonstrate use of Outbreak.info as one-stop online source for COVID data
Scripps Research Institute

While COVID-19 may be transitioning from a “pandemic” to an “endemic” phase, it remains critically important to continue tracking the virus in real-time.

Newswise: Mechanisms Underlying Autoimmunity in Down Syndrome Revealed
20-Feb-2023 9:55 AM EST
Mechanisms Underlying Autoimmunity in Down Syndrome Revealed
Mount Sinai Health System

Scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York have identified which parts of the immune system go awry and contribute to autoimmune diseases in individuals with Down syndrome.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-17-million-grant-establishes-lji-as-global-hub-for-immunology-data-curation-and-analysis
VIDEO
Released: 14-Feb-2023 1:05 PM EST
New $17 million grant establishes LJI as global hub for immunology data curation and analysis
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A new grant of over $17 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has established La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) as the leading institute for human immunology data curation, analysis, and dissemination. With this funding, LJI has taken the helm of the Human Immunology Project Consortium Data Coordinating Center, a critical tool in the effort to fuel scientific collaboration in immunoprofiling and highlight findings from the overall Human Immunology Project Consortium (HIPC).

   
Released: 13-Feb-2023 6:25 PM EST
Study reveals how drug resistant bacteria secrete toxins, suggesting targets to reduce virulence
University of Maryland, College Park

Antimicrobial resistance represents one of the top 10 global public health threats according to the World Health Organization, and scientists have been scrambling to find new tools to cure the most deadly drug-resistant infections.

Released: 30-Jan-2023 5:20 PM EST
SLU Researcher Receives $1.76 Million NIH Grant to Create STAR, an HIV-Focused Experiential Research and Capacity Building Program for Students and Young Researchers
Saint Louis University Medical Center

Using a crowdsourcing framework utilized over the past five years, Juliet Iwelunmor, Ph.D., professor of global health and behavioral science and health education at Saint Louis University’s College for Public Health and Social Justice, is taking what she learned from empowering youth in Nigeria to identify young people in the United States who aim to become the next generation of HIV researchers, leaders and innovators in the field.

Newswise: LJI scientists uncover the structure and function of Inmazeb, the first FDA-approved drug for Ebola virus infection
Released: 30-Jan-2023 4:30 PM EST
LJI scientists uncover the structure and function of Inmazeb, the first FDA-approved drug for Ebola virus infection
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Inmazeb (REGN-EB3), developed by Regeneron, is a three-antibody cocktail designed to target the Ebola virus glycoprotein. The drug was first approved for clinical use in October 2020, but its exact mechanism of action has remained unclear.

   
Released: 26-Jan-2023 4:15 PM EST
Small Study Shows Promise for Antimalarial Monoclonal Antibody to Prevent Malaria
University of Maryland School of Medicine

monoclonal antibody treatment was found to be safe, well tolerated, and effective in protecting against malaria in a small group of healthy volunteers who were exposed to malaria in a challenge study, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM).

Newswise: Mount Sinai Researchers Awarded $12 Million NIH Grant to Create a Center to Unravel Novel Causes of Food Allergy and Atopic Dermatitis
Released: 25-Jan-2023 4:10 PM EST
Mount Sinai Researchers Awarded $12 Million NIH Grant to Create a Center to Unravel Novel Causes of Food Allergy and Atopic Dermatitis
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers have been awarded $12 million over five years by the National Institutes of Health to create a center to elucidate novel causes of, and contributing factors to, food allergies and atopic dermatitis. The Systems Biology of Early Atopy (SunBEAm) Analysis and Bioinformatics Center intends to develop a better understanding of allergy development. The center will apply systems biology to identify early-life markers of risk for food allergies and atopic dermatitis (also known as eczema), as well as biological pathways underlying these common conditions, through the profiling and analysis of longitudinal multi-omics data from a multi-center pre-birth cohort of 2,500 children.

Released: 24-Jan-2023 6:05 AM EST
A design of experiments approach to precision vaccine adjuvants
Washington University in St. Louis

Adjuvants are added to vaccines to improve protection, extend the duration of protection and reduce the dose or number of boosters required.

Newswise: Study reveals new genetic disorder that causes susceptibility to opportunistic infections
Released: 23-Jan-2023 2:50 PM EST
Study reveals new genetic disorder that causes susceptibility to opportunistic infections
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

An international consortium co-led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center immunogeneticist Rubén Martínez-Barricarte, PhD, has discovered a new genetic disorder that causes immunodeficiency and profound susceptibility to opportunistic infections including a life-threatening fungal pneumonia. The discovery, reported Jan. 20 in the journal Science Immunology, will help identify people who carry this in-born error of immunity (IEI).

Newswise: Multimodal Sequencing Achieves High-Quality Results from Small Volumes of Frozen Tumor Specimens
Released: 18-Jan-2023 4:50 PM EST
Multimodal Sequencing Achieves High-Quality Results from Small Volumes of Frozen Tumor Specimens
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia researchers invent a multimodal sequencing technique that achieves high-quality results from small volumes of frozen tumor specimens--the ability to study cancer tissues archived in biobanks should increase the number and variety of tumor samples available for scientific analysis and advance the discovery of biomarkers and drug targets.

Newswise: Durable SARS-CoV-2 antibodies bind to two viral targets at once
Released: 17-Jan-2023 4:20 PM EST
Durable SARS-CoV-2 antibodies bind to two viral targets at once
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows how ideal antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 hit their marks. Now scientists are looking at how we might harness their power in new antibody therapeutics and even more effective COVID-19 vaccines.

   
Newswise: Study links specific outdoor air pollutants to asthma attacks in urban children
Released: 5-Jan-2023 4:00 PM EST
Study links specific outdoor air pollutants to asthma attacks in urban children
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Moderate levels of two outdoor air pollutants, ozone and fine particulate matter, are associated with non-viral asthma attacks in children and adolescents who live in low-income urban areas, a study funded by the National Institutes of Health has found.

Released: 4-Jan-2023 7:40 PM EST
Does COVID change the body’s response to other threats? Depends on your sex
Yale University

The long-term effects of infection on the immune system have long intrigued John Tsang, a Yale immunobiologist. After the body has faced down a pathogen, does the immune system return to the previous baseline? Or does a single infection change it in ways that alter how it will respond not only to a familiar virus but also to the next new viral or bacterial threat it faces?

Newswise: A Three-Dose Malaria Vaccine Shows Safety, Efficacy in West African Adults
Released: 4-Jan-2023 12:55 PM EST
A Three-Dose Malaria Vaccine Shows Safety, Efficacy in West African Adults
University of Maryland School of Medicine

A three-dose regimen of a whole-parasite vaccine against malaria – called Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ) vaccine – demonstrated safety and efficacy when tested in adults living in Burkina Faso, West Africa, which has endemic malaria.

Newswise:Video Embedded lji-scientists-confirm-smallpox-vaccine-also-teaches-t-cells-to-fight-mpox
VIDEO
Released: 6-Dec-2022 8:30 PM EST
LJI scientists confirm smallpox vaccine also teaches T cells to fight mpox
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

"Vaccines such as JYNNEOS should be able to induce T cells that also recognize mpox and can provide protection from severe disease."

   
Newswise: Small glowing protein allows researchers to peer deeper into living tissues
Released: 6-Dec-2022 5:15 PM EST
Small glowing protein allows researchers to peer deeper into living tissues
Duke University

Biomedical and genetic engineers at Duke University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine have designed a small fluorescent protein that emits and absorbs light that penetrates deep into biological tissue.

Newswise: Researchers developing treatment for drug-resistant fungus with $3M-plus grant from National Institutes of Health
Released: 30-Nov-2022 11:05 AM EST
Researchers developing treatment for drug-resistant fungus with $3M-plus grant from National Institutes of Health
Case Western Reserve University

With a new $3 million-plus grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Case Western Reserve University researchers are examining the next level of treatment for Candida auris (C.auris), a multidrug-resistant yeast that causes serious infection and, in some cases, death.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 11:20 AM EST
Holding Mycophenolate Mofetil for 10 Days or More May Improve COVID-19 Vaccine Response
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented this week at ACR Convergence 2022, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, demonstrated that withholding mycophenolate mofetil for 10 days significantly increased antibody response after 2 doses of COVID-19 vaccine, without a significant increase in flares.


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