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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

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Embargo will expire:
29-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
23-Jan-2020 12:40 PM EST

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Newswise: Racial disparities in heart failure explained

Racial disparities in heart failure explained

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Researchers at UT Southwestern have uncovered evidence that the higher prevalence of “malignant” enlargement of the heart among blacks contributes to the higher incidence of heart failure in this population.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Healthcare, Heart Disease, Men's Health, Race and Ethnicity, Women's Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), All Journal News,

Released:
14-Jan-2020 3:00 PM EST
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Jan-2020 3:00 PM EST

Study Identifies Genetic Anomaly Associated with Poor Response to Common Asthma Treatment

Cleveland Clinic

A new Cleveland Clinic study has uncovered a genetic anomaly associated with poor response to a common asthma treatment. The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, showed that asthmatic patients with the gene variant are less likely to respond to glucocorticoids and often develop severe asthma.

Channels: Asthma, Genetics, Healthcare, Public Health, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Heart, Lung, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Embargoed Feed - hidden, All Journal News,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 10:25 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Evidence Linking ‘Vaping’ to Increased Odds Of Asthma And COPD

Evidence Linking ‘Vaping’ to Increased Odds Of Asthma And COPD

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Using data from a large federal government telephone survey of adults, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that inhaling heated tobacco vapor through e-cigarettes was linked to increased odds of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), conditions long demonstrated to be caused by smoking traditional, combustible cigarettes. The data, the researchers say, also suggest that odds of developing COPD may be as much as six times greater when people report they both vape and smoke tobacco regularly, compared with those who don’t use any tobacco products at all.

Channels: Grant Funded News, Asthma, Public Health, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, Smoking, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), All Journal News,

Released:
7-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST
Research Results
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Blood transfusions: Fresh red blood cells no better than older ones.

Universite de Montreal

Findings from the ABC-PICU study on critically ill children may alter policies at hospitals where fresh red cells are preferentially used.

Channels: All Journal News, Blood, Children's Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), JAMA,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 1:00 PM EST
Research Results
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Released:
9-Dec-2019 2:40 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Novel bioprinter shows potential to speed tissue engineering

Novel bioprinter shows potential to speed tissue engineering

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers have found a way to speed engineered-tissue creation using a novel bioprinter built for $2,000, they report in the journal Micromachines. Building blocks for the tissue are pre-grown spheroids of human induced-pluripotent stem cells that contain 200,000 cells per spheroid.

Channels: All Journal News, Cell Biology, Engineering, Stem Cells, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI),

Released:
5-Dec-2019 4:55 PM EST
Research Results
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Study Assesses Asthma Treatment Options in African American Children and Adults

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

A new study of African Americans with poorly controlled asthma, found differences in patients’ responses to commonly used treatments. Contrary to what researchers had expected, almost half of young children in the study responded differently than older children and adults, and than white children in prior studies.

Channels: Asthma, Children's Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), NEJM, All Journal News,

Released:
1-Oct-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Nanoparticles Wiggling Through Mucus May Predict Severe COPD

Nanoparticles Wiggling Through Mucus May Predict Severe COPD

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a proof-of-concept experiment, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully used microscopic man-made particles to predict the severity of patients’ chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by measuring how quickly the particles move through mucus samples. The technique, say the researchers, could eventually help doctors deliver more effective treatments sooner.

Channels: All Journal News, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), Grant Funded News,

Released:
30-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Research Results


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