Curated News: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

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Released: 21-Aug-2023 2:05 PM EDT
Research aims to uncover genetic and environmental risk factors of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Wayne State University Division of Research

A $3 million, five-year award from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences of the NIH aims to discover and validate the gene Х heavy metal (GXM) interactions in human livers and to understand their role in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Newswise: Nanozymes drive tumor-specific drug delivery while minimizing toxicity
Released: 9-Aug-2023 10:35 AM EDT
Nanozymes drive tumor-specific drug delivery while minimizing toxicity
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Nanozymes—artificial enzymes that can carry out pre-determined chemical reactions—could selectively activate a cancer drug within a tumor while minimizing damage to healthy tissue in a mouse model of triple negative breast cancer.

Newswise: Transcription Factors Contribute to Subtypes of Colorectal Cancers
Released: 27-Jul-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Transcription Factors Contribute to Subtypes of Colorectal Cancers
Johns Hopkins Medicine

New research in colorectal cancers directed by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center suggests that expression of transcription factors — proteins that help turn specific genes on or off by binding to nearby DNA — may play a central role in the degree of DNA methylation across the genome, contributing to the development of different subtypes of these cancers. Methylation is a process in which certain chemical groups attach to areas of DNA that guide genes’ on/off switches.

Released: 19-Jul-2023 12:00 PM EDT
Why Ongoing Worker Safety Training Is Critical to Effective Disaster Response
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers is part of a national network of institutions tasked with ensuring workers have the knowledge and skills to stay safe on the job.

   
Newswise: Women treated for breast cancer may age faster than cancer-free women
Released: 19-Jul-2023 10:05 AM EDT
Women treated for breast cancer may age faster than cancer-free women
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Women diagnosed and treated for breast cancer have increased biological aging compared to women who remain free of breast cancer, according to a new study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. Among women diagnosed with breast cancer, the association with faster biological aging was most pronounced for those who received radiation therapy, while surgery showed no association with biological aging. This finding suggests that developing cancer is not what increases the aging effect.

Newswise:Video Embedded proteins-predict-significant-step-toward-development-of-diabetes
VIDEO
28-Jun-2023 3:00 PM EDT
Proteins Predict Significant Step Toward Development of Diabetes
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Scientists have taken an important step forward in predicting who will develop Type 1 diabetes months before symptoms appear.

Released: 27-Jun-2023 9:00 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Institute for Exposomics Research Awarded $8.45 Million Grant to Study Environmental Health
Mount Sinai Health System

New five-year award will focus on the effects of environmental exposures on health across the lifespan

   
Released: 14-Jun-2023 1:30 PM EDT
UC Irvine receives grant to study lead exposure effects on children’s learning, behavior
University of California, Irvine

The Program in Public Health at the University of California, Irvine has received a five-year, $2.7 million grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to research the connection between low-level lead exposure during pregnancy and early childhood and children’s school performance and behavior in Santa Ana, California.

Released: 7-Jun-2023 8:00 PM EDT
Exposure to “forever chemicals” during pregnancy linked to increased risk of obesity in kids
Brown University

The risks of exposure to “forever chemicals” start even before birth, a new study confirms, potentially setting up children for future health issues.

Released: 5-Jun-2023 2:35 PM EDT
Fetal exposure to PCBs affects hearing health later in life
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology found that early exposure to an environmental chemical called polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, made it more difficult for mice to recover from sound-related trauma sustained later in life.

Released: 10-May-2023 2:45 PM EDT
Air pollution worsens movement disorder after stroke
Hiroshima University

Air pollution has been shown to have a negative effect on the prognosis of ischemic stroke, or stroke caused by reduced blood flow to the brain, but the exact mechanism is unknown. A team of researchers recently conducted a study to determine whether or not increased inflammation of the brain, also known as neuroinflammation, is the main culprit.

   
30-Mar-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Higher lithium levels in drinking water may raise autism risk
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Pregnant women whose household tap water had higher levels of lithium had a moderately higher risk of their offspring being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, researchers reported in JAMA Pediatrics.

Newswise: Black, Latinx Californians face highest exposure to oil and gas wells
Released: 24-Mar-2023 4:25 PM EDT
Black, Latinx Californians face highest exposure to oil and gas wells
University of California, Berkeley

More than 1 million Californians live near active oil or gas wells, potentially exposing them to drilling-related pollution that can contribute to asthma, preterm births and a variety of other health problems.

   
Released: 8-Mar-2023 12:40 PM EST
New Study: Abatacept Therapy Offers Promising Results Treating Juvenile Dermatomyositis
George Washington University

Juvenile dermatomyositis, a rare but often severe and chronic systemic autoimmune disease, includes a large number of patients who are treatment resistant, requiring long term immunosuppressive therapy. A small open-label study published in Arthritis and Rheumatology shows promise using a targeted biologic therapy called abatacept to treat such patients.

Released: 6-Mar-2023 12:35 PM EST
Exposure to green space linked to reduced risk of postpartum depression
University of California, Irvine

In an analysis of more than 415,00 electronic health records of healthy, full-term births in Southern California, a team of researchers led by the University of California, Irvine determined that exposure to green space and tree coverage was associated with a decreased risk of postpartum depression among mothers.

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This news release is embargoed until 17-Feb-2023 2:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 16-Feb-2023 9:00 AM EST

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Released: 15-Feb-2023 11:05 AM EST
PFAS Can Suppress White Blood Cell’s Ability to Destroy Invaders
North Carolina State University

In a new study, researchers found that the PFAS chemical GenX suppresses the neutrophil respiratory burst – the method white blood cells known as neutrophils use to kill invading pathogens.

27-Jan-2023 9:45 AM EST
Clemson scientists identify enzyme that reduces diet-induced obesity in humans
Clemson University

Clemson University researchers have identified an enzyme and its products in humans that reduce diet-induced obesity.

Released: 20-Dec-2022 6:10 PM EST
Exposure to toxic blue-green algae, exacerbated by climate change, shown to cause liver disease in mouse models
University of California, Irvine

Algal blooms or cylindrospermopsin, exacerbated by climate change, shown to have a connection with several adverse health effects.

   
Released: 12-Dec-2022 4:15 PM EST
Molecules found in mucus could prevent cholera infection
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

MIT researchers have identified molecules found in mucus that can block cholera infection by interfering with the genes that cause the microbe to switch into a harmful state.

Newswise: Household Air Cleaners Improve Heart Health Among Individuals with COPD, Researchers Find
Released: 5-Dec-2022 10:00 AM EST
Household Air Cleaners Improve Heart Health Among Individuals with COPD, Researchers Find
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A six-month study led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers concludes that the use of portable home air purifiers can improve some markers of cardiovascular health in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD

Newswise:Video Embedded gene-that-guides-earliest-social-behaviors-could-be-key-to-understanding-autism
VIDEO
20-Nov-2022 9:00 PM EST
Gene that guides earliest social behaviors could be key to understanding autism
University of Utah Health

A new animal study points to a gene that is important for the earliest development of basic social behaviors.

Released: 17-Nov-2022 7:10 PM EST
Researchers demonstrate in mice a new way to deliver medication to malignant brain tumors
Brown University

Researchers have demonstrated in mice a new approach for delivering medication across the blood-brain barrier to treat tumors that cause aggressive, lethal brain cancer.

Released: 4-Nov-2022 4:00 PM EDT
Extreme Temperatures Take Deadly Toll on People in Texas Prisons, Study Finds
Brown University

The U.S. has the world’s largest population of prisoners, and Texas holds more incarcerated people than any other state.

27-Oct-2022 12:45 PM EDT
New Tool for Estimating People’s Total Exposure to Potentially Harmful Chemicals Is Developed
Mount Sinai Health System

A novel metric that estimates our “burden,” or cumulative exposure, to a family of thousands of synthetic chemicals that we encounter in everyday life with potentially adverse health impacts, has been created by a team of researchers at Mount Sinai.

Newswise: $11.3 million NIH Superfund award to address environmental health issues caused by VOCs
8-Sep-2022 5:00 PM EDT
$11.3 million NIH Superfund award to address environmental health issues caused by VOCs
Wayne State University Division of Research

Wayne State University has received a five-year, approximately $11.3 million award from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) of the National Institutes of Health to create a new Superfund Research Program, the “Center for Leadership in Environmental Awareness and Research (CLEAR).” The Center will be dedicated to understanding and mitigating adverse birth outcomes and serious developmental health problems that have been associated with urban environmental exposure to volatile organic chemcials (VOCs), a special class of pollutant found in the subsurface of post-industrial cities like Detroit.

   
Newswise: COVID-19 Fattens Up Our Body’s Cells to Fuel Its Viral Takeover
Released: 28-Jun-2022 12:00 AM EDT
COVID-19 Fattens Up Our Body’s Cells to Fuel Its Viral Takeover
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

The virus that causes COVID-19 takes over the body’s fat-processing system and boosts cellular triglycerides as it causes disease.

29-Apr-2022 9:25 AM EDT
Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals May Impair Bone Health in Male Teens
Endocrine Society

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and phthalates (two types of endocrine-disrupting chemicals) may be associated with lower bone mineral density in male teens, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Newswise: Eight substances added to 15th Report on Carcinogens
21-Dec-2021 10:25 AM EST
Eight substances added to 15th Report on Carcinogens
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Eight substances have been added to the Report on Carcinogens, bringing the total list to 256 substances that are known, or reasonably anticipated, to cause cancer in humans. This is the 15th Report on Carcinogens, which is a cumulative report, mandated by Congress and prepared by the National Toxicology Program (NTP).

   
Released: 10-Dec-2021 1:10 PM EST
Chemicals from Hair and Beauty Products Impact Hormones, Especially During Pregnancy
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Use of certain personal care products during pregnancy may impact maternal hormone levels, according to a new Rutgers study.

Released: 15-Nov-2021 4:05 PM EST
Researchers target a mouse’s own cells, rather than using antibiotics, to treat pneumonia
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a therapy that targets host cells rather than bacterial cells in treating bacterial pneumonia in rodents. The method involves white blood cells of the immune system called macrophages that eat bacteria, and a group of compounds that are naturally produced in mice and humans.

   
Released: 6-Oct-2021 8:45 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Finds Thousands of Unknown Chemicals in E-Cigarettes
 Johns Hopkins University

Vaping aerosols contain thousands of unknown chemicals and substances not disclosed by manufacturers, including industrial chemicals and caffeine, Johns Hopkins University researchers found.

Released: 26-Apr-2021 2:40 PM EDT
$1.4M NIH grant helps FSU researchers clean carcinogens from groundwater
Florida State University

A Florida State University researcher will lead a study into how bacteria can be used to remove carcinogens from groundwater thanks to a $1.4 million grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Released: 11-Mar-2021 4:30 PM EST
Preterm birth, prolonged labor influenced by progesterone balance
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

New research by the National Institutes of Health found that unbalanced progesterone signals may cause some pregnant women to experience preterm labor or prolonged labor. The study in mice — published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences — provides novel insights for developing treatments.

Released: 10-Mar-2021 12:05 PM EST
Study of mosquito protein could lead to treatments against life-threatening viruses
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

The mosquito protein AEG12 strongly inhibits the family of viruses that cause yellow fever, dengue, West Nile, and Zika and weakly inhibits coronaviruses, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. They found that AEG12 works by destabilizing the viral envelope, breaking its protective covering.

   
Released: 5-Mar-2021 9:25 AM EST
Antibiotic-Resistant Strains of Staph Bacteria May Be Spreading Between Pigs Raised in Factory Farms and People in North Carolina
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

DNA sequencing of bacteria found in pigs and humans in rural eastern North Carolina, an area with concentrated industrial-scale pig-farming, suggests that multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains are spreading between pigs, farmworkers, their families and community residents, and represents an emerging public health threat, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released: 13-Nov-2020 9:55 AM EST
New Saliva-Based Antibody Test for SARS-CoV-2 Highly Accurate in Initial Study
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new saliva-based test developed by a team at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has been found to accurately detect the presence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Released: 28-Jul-2020 10:45 AM EDT
Higher BPA Levels Linked to More Asthma Symptoms in Children
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Children in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore tended to have more asthma symptoms when levels of the synthetic chemical BPA (Bisphenol A) in their urine were elevated, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and School of Medicine.

21-Jul-2020 6:35 PM EDT
Jet Aircraft Exhaust Linked to Preterm Births
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Researchers from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health have found that pregnant women exposed to high levels of ultrafine particles from jet airplane exhaust are 14% more likely to have a preterm birth than those exposed to lower levels.

13-Jul-2020 5:45 PM EDT
Study of Natural Gas Flaring Finds High Risks to Babies
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

UCLA & USC study of natural gas flaring finds high risks to babies; researchers found exposure was associated with 50% higher odds of preterm birth compared with no exposure.

4-May-2020 5:10 PM EDT
NIH Statement on World Asthma Day 2020
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Today on World Asthma Day, the National Institutes of Health stands with patients, families, advocates, researchers, and health care professionals to raise awareness about this common chronic respiratory disease, the people it affects, and the research that improves its prevention and treatment.

Released: 5-Mar-2020 11:00 AM EST
The Complex Biology Behind Your Love (or Hatred) of Coffee
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Why do some people feel like they need three cups of coffee just to get through the day when others are happy with only one? Why do some people abstain entirely? New research suggests that our intake of coffee – the most popular beverage in America, above bottled water, sodas, tea, and beer – is affected by a positive feedback loop between genetics and the environment.

   
Released: 26-Sep-2019 8:00 AM EDT
Researchers Discover New, Treatable Pathway Known to Cause Hypertension in Obese People
Johns Hopkins Medicine

There’s no question that as body weight increases, so too does blood pressure. Now, in a study of mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have revealed exactly which molecules are likely responsible for the link between obesity and blood pressure. Blocking one of these molecules — a signaling channel that’s found in a tiny organ on the side of your neck — effectively lowers blood pressure in obese mice, the researchers reported recently in the journal Circulation Research.

12-Sep-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Flavoring Ingredient Exceeds Safety Levels in E-Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco
Duke Health

A potential carcinogen that has been banned as a food additive is present in concerningly high levels in electronic cigarette liquids and smokeless tobacco products, according to a new study from Duke Health.



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