Curated News: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

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Newswise: Repairing broken brain circuits may offer path to new Parkinson’s treatments
Released: 24-Aug-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Repairing broken brain circuits may offer path to new Parkinson’s treatments
Van Andel Institute

Scientists have identified a series of processes that help the brain adapt to damage caused by breakdowns in circuits that govern movement, cognition and sensory perception.

Released: 11-Aug-2023 9:55 AM EDT
UTHealth Houston joins SATURN trial, studying role of statins in recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A clinical trial evaluating the role of statins in the risk of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in patients presenting with ICH, has opened for enrollment at UTHealth Houston.

Newswise: UTHealth Houston researcher awarded $3.1M NIH grant to study sudden unexpected death in epilepsy
Released: 8-Aug-2023 1:10 PM EDT
UTHealth Houston researcher awarded $3.1M NIH grant to study sudden unexpected death in epilepsy
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A five-year, $3.1 million grant to study preventive strategies for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) has been awarded to UTHealth Houston by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Newswise: New Community Partnership Model Boosts Inclusion of Participants into HIV Cure-Directed Research
Released: 19-Jul-2023 12:05 PM EDT
New Community Partnership Model Boosts Inclusion of Participants into HIV Cure-Directed Research
Wistar Institute

Scientists have long used community advisory boards to engage communities and provide feedback on studies, but this model has limitations. Now, Wistar Institute researchers are sharing how a more inclusive model for community engagement can lead to deeper insights and greater community participation in HIV research.

   
Released: 19-Jul-2023 11:30 AM EDT
Tracing maternal behavior to brain immune function
Ohio State University

Immune system changes in the pregnant body that protect the fetus appear to extend to the brain, where a decrease in immune cells late in gestation may factor into the onset of maternal behavior, new research in rats suggests.

   
Newswise:Video Embedded air-monitor-can-detect-covid-19-virus-variants-in-about-5-minutes
VIDEO
Released: 10-Jul-2023 8:30 AM EDT
Air monitor can detect COVID-19 virus variants in about 5 minutes
Washington University in St. Louis

Now that the emergency phase of the COVID-19 pandemic has ended, scientists are looking at ways to surveil indoor environments in real time for viruses. By combining recent advances in aerosol sampling technology and an ultrasensitive biosensing technique, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have created a real-time monitor that can detect any of the SARS-CoV-2 virus variants in a room in about 5 minutes.

Newswise: Different areas of the brain activated depending on structural complexity of music, language
Released: 5-Jul-2023 10:15 AM EDT
Different areas of the brain activated depending on structural complexity of music, language
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Distinct, though neighboring, areas of the brain are activated when processing music and language, with specific sub-regions engaged for simple melodies versus complex melodies, and for simple versus complex sentences, according to research from UTHealth Houston.

Released: 29-Jun-2023 6:00 AM EDT
Cancerous brain tumor cells may be at ‘critical point’ between order and disorder, study suggests
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Glioblastoma cells are poised near a “critical point” of order and disorder — meaning, the cells possess some form of large-scale coordination throughout the whole tumor that allows them to respond in practical unison to attempts to kill tumor cells, such as chemotherapy or radiation, a study suggests. Researchers say disrupting the large-scale organization of brain tumors may result in more powerful ways to treat and one day eliminate brain tumors.

26-Jun-2023 10:50 AM EDT
Scientists identify the first genetic marker for MS severity
University of Cambridge

A study of more than 22,000 people with multiple sclerosis has discovered the first genetic variant associated with faster disease progression, which can rob patients of their mobility and independence over time.

16-Jun-2023 1:40 PM EDT
Is TBI a Chronic Condition?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People with TBI may continue to improve or decline years after their injury, making it a more chronic illness, according to a study published in the June 21, 2023, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Scientists develop universal donor stem cell therapy to treat degenerative brain diseases in a preclinical study
Released: 15-Jun-2023 5:10 PM EDT
Scientists develop universal donor stem cell therapy to treat degenerative brain diseases in a preclinical study
City of Hope

Scientists at City of Hope have developed universal donor stem cells that could one day provide lifesaving therapy to children with lethal brain conditions, such as Canavan disease, as well as to people with other degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis.

Newswise: Researchers to Explore Potential of New Treatment Against Vascular Dementia
Released: 8-Jun-2023 5:20 PM EDT
Researchers to Explore Potential of New Treatment Against Vascular Dementia
University of Texas at El Paso

Researchers from The University of Texas at El Paso’s School of Pharmacy will explore the viability of a new treatment for vascular dementia, thanks to a $2.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

30-May-2023 10:30 AM EDT
Deep-brain stimulation during sleep strengthens memory
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

This study provides provides the first physiological evidence from inside the human brain supporting the dominant scientific theory on how the brain consolidates memory during sleep. Further, deep-brain stimulation during a critical time in the sleep cycle appeared to improve memory consolidation.

Released: 30-May-2023 7:50 PM EDT
Flexible nanoelectrodes can provide fine-grained brain stimulation
Rice University

According to a study published in Cell Reports, the tiny implantable devices formed stable, long-lasting and seamless tissue-electrode interfaces with minimal scarring or degradation in rodents.

   
Released: 15-May-2023 7:25 PM EDT
Distinct types of cerebellar neurons control motor and social behaviors
Texas Children's Hospital

The cerebellum, a major part of the hindbrain in all vertebrates, is important for motor coordination, language acquisition, and regulating social and emotional behaviors. A study led by Dr. Roy Sillitoe, professor of Pathology and Neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine and investigator at the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute (Duncan NRI) at Texas Children’s Hospital, shows two distinct types of cerebellar neurons differentially regulate motor and non-motor behaviors during development and in adulthood.

   
Newswise: Discovery suggests route to safer pain medications
2-May-2023 3:00 PM EDT
Discovery suggests route to safer pain medications
Washington University in St. Louis

Strategies to treat pain without triggering dangerous side effects such as euphoria and addiction have proven elusive. Now scientists at Washington University School of Medicine have identified a potential pathway to pain relief that neither triggers addiction nor causes hallucinations.

Newswise: New Study May Advance Use of Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chemotherapy-Related Pain and Cancer Treatment
Released: 27-Apr-2023 11:30 AM EDT
New Study May Advance Use of Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chemotherapy-Related Pain and Cancer Treatment
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine say they have evidence from a new study in rats that spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be useful in reducing chronic pain in people undergoing active treatment with a common anti-cancer drug.

Newswise:Video Embedded at-home-videos-to-assess-musculoskeletal-health
VIDEO
Released: 21-Apr-2023 12:55 PM EDT
At-home videos to assess musculoskeletal health
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIH-funded researchers developed an online tool that can analyze self-collected, at-home videos with a smartphone. When deployed in a nationwide study, the tool could predict physical health and osteoarthritis of the knee or hip.

Newswise: Traumatic Brain Injury Interferes with Immune System Cells’ Recycling Process in Brain Cells
Released: 4-Apr-2023 1:10 PM EDT
Traumatic Brain Injury Interferes with Immune System Cells’ Recycling Process in Brain Cells
University of Maryland School of Medicine

In a new study published in the January issue of Autophagy, they found that after traumatic brain injury, the brain’s immune system cells’ internal recycling function slowed dramatically, allowing waste products to build up and interfere with recovery from injury.

Released: 14-Mar-2023 2:25 PM EDT
Potential Treatment Target for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy Identified
Tufts University

A new study by Tufts University researchers found a molecule that could be a target for treatment in patients who have become resistant to traditional anti-seizure drugs

   
Released: 24-Feb-2023 11:55 AM EST
Calming the destructive cells of ALS by two independent approaches
Northwestern University

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered two ways to preserve diseased upper motor neurons that would normally be destroyed in ALS, based on a study in mice. Upper motor neurons initiate movement, and they degenerate in ALS.

Newswise: Potential Treatment Target for Rare Form of Infant Epilepsy Identified
Released: 21-Feb-2023 2:20 PM EST
Potential Treatment Target for Rare Form of Infant Epilepsy Identified
Tufts University

New research from Tufts University School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences suggests that the timing of the death of certain inhibitory neurons in the brain shortly after birth may be at least partly to blame for infantile spasms syndrome (ISS), a rare but devastating form of epilepsy that develops most frequently between four and eight months of age but can emerge within weeks of birth until ages 4 or 5.

Released: 10-Feb-2023 7:50 PM EST
Review strengthens evidence that repetitive head impacts can cause CTE
Boston University School of Medicine

During the past 17 years, there has been a remarkable increase in scientific research concerning chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) with researchers at the BU CTE Center at the forefront.

Newswise: St. Jude scientists create more efficient CAR immunotherapies using a molecular anchor
Released: 2-Feb-2023 2:15 PM EST
St. Jude scientists create more efficient CAR immunotherapies using a molecular anchor
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude scientists added a small physical structure called an anchor domain to the CAR molecule. The anchor domain connects the CAR to the internal infrastructure of the immune cell. It augments and helps organize the immune synapse

   
Released: 27-Jan-2023 2:05 PM EST
Spinal Cord Injury: Can Brain and Nerve Stimulation Restore Movement?
Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Even in people with complete paralysis after spinal cord injury, some nerves fibers are preserved. A Columbia physician-scientist is developing a new way to salvage those fibers and restore movement.

Newswise: Special Vascular Cells Adjust Blood Flow in Brain Capillaries Based on Local Energy Needs
Released: 25-Jan-2023 11:35 AM EST
Special Vascular Cells Adjust Blood Flow in Brain Capillaries Based on Local Energy Needs
University of Maryland School of Medicine

University of Maryland School of Medicine’s researchers have discovered that a certain type of cell that sits on top of the brain’s smallest blood vessels senses when their brain region needs energy. When glucose levels are low, these cells signal blood vessels to dilate, increasing the blood flow regionally and allowing more energy to fuel that part of the brain.

13-Jan-2023 4:40 PM EST
Does the Risk of Stroke from Common Risk Factors Change as People Age?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

High blood pressure and diabetes are known risk factors for stroke, but now a new study shows that the amount of risk may decrease as people age. The study is published in the January 18, 2023, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Food for thought: Early Nutrition Shapes the Brain and Influences What We Like to Eat
10-Jan-2023 10:05 AM EST
Food for thought: Early Nutrition Shapes the Brain and Influences What We Like to Eat
Stony Brook University

A new study by Stony Brook University researchers showed there is indeed a strong relationship between what we eat early in life and food preferences in adults. This relationship depends the effects of our early experience with food has on the brain. The work is published in Science Advances.

Newswise: $11M NIH Grant Will Support Evaluation of Alzheimer’s Screening Tool in Primary Care Settings
Released: 8-Dec-2022 11:00 AM EST
$11M NIH Grant Will Support Evaluation of Alzheimer’s Screening Tool in Primary Care Settings
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Investigators at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System, Regenstrief Institute, and Indiana University School of Medicine have received an $11 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to evaluate an Einstein-developed test for assessing cognitive impairment and dementia.

Released: 30-Nov-2022 2:05 PM EST
CHOP Researchers Discover Genetic Variant Associated with Earlier Onset Childhood Epilepsy
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers have discovered a specific genetic variant in SCN1A, the most common genetic epilepsy, that leads to an earlier onset of epilepsy, with clinical features distinct from other epilepsies. The researchers also identified a potentially effective treatment strategy.

Newswise: UTSW scientists identify brain circuit that triggers rare, blood sugar-dependent epilepsy
Released: 16-Nov-2022 5:15 PM EST
UTSW scientists identify brain circuit that triggers rare, blood sugar-dependent epilepsy
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A small group of brain cells linked in a circuit is responsible for setting off whole-brain seizures in a rare form of epilepsy affected by blood sugar levels, a study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests. The finding, published in Science Translational Medicine, could lead to new treatments for other metabolic disorders in the brain, the authors said.

Newswise: Study Highlights Importance of Long-term Management of Hypertension
Released: 12-Oct-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Study Highlights Importance of Long-term Management of Hypertension
Wake Forest University School of Medicine

In 2015, published findings from the landmark Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) showed that intensive blood pressure management reduced cardiovascular disease and lowered the risk of death. In 2019, results of the SPRINT MIND trial showed that lowering blood pressure also reduced the risk of mild cognitive impairment in older adults. Now, researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine have shown that while intensive blood pressure control was beneficial to SPRINT participants’ health during the trial, the benefits for cardiovascular mortality went away after approximately two years when protocols for blood pressure management were no longer being followed.

Newswise: Scientists ID pathway that triggers mice to scratch when they see others do the same
Released: 4-Oct-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Scientists ID pathway that triggers mice to scratch when they see others do the same
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a pathway in the brains of mice that is activated when the animals see other mice scratching, but that pathway does not run through the visual cortex.

Released: 28-Sep-2022 12:15 PM EDT
High blood pressure speeds up mental decline, but does not fully explain dementia disparities
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

High blood pressure means faster slide into signs of dementia or Alzheimer’s, but does not explain the overall disparity between Hispanic/Latino people and non-Hispanic people in dementia risk.

Newswise: New Grant Supports Cognitive Risk-Benefit Analysis of Playing Soccer
Released: 22-Sep-2022 11:00 AM EDT
New Grant Supports Cognitive Risk-Benefit Analysis of Playing Soccer
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have now received a five-year, $3.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to assess the tradeoffs between soccer’s aerobic brain benefits and the adverse effects from heading in a study employing neuroimaging, exercise testing, and cognitive testing.

Released: 21-Sep-2022 2:15 PM EDT
New Study Provides Insights Into Stroke Recurrence and Death in Patients with Insulin Resistance
George Washington University

In patients with post-stroke cognitive impairment, the risk factors that contribute to stroke recurrence or death in certain populations is still unknown. A better understanding of who is at risk for a stroke recurrence or death would allow clinicians to better identify, monitor and treat stroke patients at a higher risk, which could potentially prevent stroke recurrence and save lives.

Released: 6-Sep-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Restoring movement after spinal cord injury focus of new research
Washington University in St. Louis

Ismael Seáñez will lead an interdisciplinary team of Washington University researchers and physicians to understand the changes in the neural circuits that may result in motor function improvements through using spinal cord stimulation.

Released: 25-Aug-2022 1:55 PM EDT
Tufts University Scientists Identify Brain Pathway Connected to Hunger and Overeating
Tufts University

Scientists at Tufts University have discovered a pathway through which communications are regulated in the brain, and a misfire in the messaging can result in overeating, slower burning of calories, and other metabolic problems linked to obesity.

   
Newswise: Penn State awarded $1.6M to study if COVID-19 contributes to cognitive decline
Released: 25-Aug-2022 9:45 AM EDT
Penn State awarded $1.6M to study if COVID-19 contributes to cognitive decline
Penn State College of Medicine

Penn State College of Medicine received a $1.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will support research into whether COVID-19 contributes to the development of cognitive decline.

Released: 18-Jul-2022 3:20 PM EDT
FSU Team Makes Discovery Advancing Epilepsy Research
Florida State University

A team of Florida State University College of Medicine researchers has found a link between a specific protein in the brain and increased vulnerability to neurodegeneration for individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE).

Released: 29-Jun-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Organoids Reveal Similarities Between Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 & Rett Syndrome
UC San Diego Health

Using brain organoids, UC San Diego researchers discover mutational commonalities between muscular dystrophy type 1 and Rett syndrome, suggesting the potential of a similar treatment for both.

Newswise: Dynamic Cells Linked to Brain Tumor Growth and Recurrence
Released: 28-Jun-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Dynamic Cells Linked to Brain Tumor Growth and Recurrence
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Tumors are made up of many types of cells, both cancerous and benign. The specific complexity of the cells inside brain tumors has been a trademark of the disease, one that makes treatment extremely difficult. While scientists have long known about the variety of cells within a brain tumor, the ways these tumors grow has relied on the understanding that the cells are static, unmoving and relatively fixed.

Released: 23-Jun-2022 6:00 AM EDT
Scientists Hope to Create a Health ‘Scorecard’ for Dementia Risk
UC Davis Health (Defunct)

An important new study of diverse communities is looking at how brain changes, genetics and other factors contribute to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The results could affect millions. Among people 65 and older, about 1 in 9 has Alzheimer’s disease.

9-May-2022 12:45 PM EDT
Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy Not Linked to Epilepsy in Children
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study suggests that antidepressant use by mothers during the first trimester of pregnancy does not increase the chances of epilepsy and seizures in babies. The research is published in the May 11, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise:Video Embedded multi-tasking-wearable-continuously-monitors-glucose-alcohol-and-lactate
VIDEO
6-May-2022 2:35 PM EDT
Multi-Tasking Wearable Continuously Monitors Glucose, Alcohol, and Lactate
University of California San Diego

Imagine being able to measure your blood sugar levels, know if you’ve had too much to drink, and track your fatigue during a workout, all in one small device worn on your skin. UC San Diego engineers developed a prototype of such a wearable that continuously monitors several health stats at once.

Newswise: Neural Pathway Key to Sensation of Pleasant Touch Identified
27-Apr-2022 5:30 PM EDT
Neural Pathway Key to Sensation of Pleasant Touch Identified
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers from the Washington University Center for the Study of Itch and Sensory Disorders have identified a specific neuropeptide and a neural circuit that transmit pleasant touch from the skin to the brain. The findings eventually may help scientists better understand and treat disorders characterized by touch avoidance and impaired social development.

Released: 19-Apr-2022 4:45 PM EDT
Mayo researchers, collaborators affirm useful blood biomarker for group of brain disorders in new study
Mayo Clinic

A test of protein in the blood gets further support as a biomarker for patients diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a group of brain disorders with few treatment options. These disorders are characterized by changes in behavior, cognition, language or movement.

24-Mar-2022 4:05 PM EDT
CHOP Researchers Redefine the Mechanisms of Dravet Syndrome
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers have found that dysfunction in an important cell subtype in the brain’s neuronal network contribute to chronic symptoms in the neurodevelopmental disorder Dravet syndrome.

14-Mar-2022 5:20 PM EDT
When the Brain Sees a Familiar Face
Cedars-Sinai

Researchers have uncovered new information about how the area of the brain responsible for memory is triggered when the eyes come to rest on a face versus another object or image.

Newswise:Video Embedded dancing-laboratory-rats-show-how-the-brain-learns-perfects-then-unconsciously-performs-a-skillful-movement
VIDEO
Released: 14-Mar-2022 2:55 PM EDT
‘Dancing’ Laboratory Rats Show How the Brain Learns, Perfects, Then Unconsciously Performs a Skillful Movement
University of Maryland School of Medicine

A researcher at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and his colleagues at Harvard University, have shown in rats how several brain regions need to work together to acquire a skill and replicate it flawlessly with each rat adding their own personal flair in the form of a “dance.”


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