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Article ID: 705342

Tube travel linked to the spread of flu-like illnesses

University of Bristol

Despite the commuter cold being a widely accepted concept, it has never been proven that public transport contributes to the spread of airborne infections. Now new research on the London underground commute has proven a link does exist.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 1:05 PM EST

Article ID: 705285

FSU researchers find racial inequity among adolescents receiving flu vaccine

Florida State University

Black adolescents living in the United States tend to receive the influenza vaccine at significantly lower rates than their white and Hispanic counterparts, according to Florida State University researchers. A new study, led by former FSU graduate student Noah Webb, along with current graduate student Benjamin Dowd-Arrow and Associate Professors of Sociology Miles Taylor and Amy Burdette, was recently published in Public Health Reports.

Released:
11-Dec-2018 4:05 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 705061

More people getting flu vaccine this year, says UGA study

University of Georgia

Compared with last year more adults getting and intending to get a flu vaccination in 2018-19 flu season

Released:
6-Dec-2018 1:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 704979

Memory B cells in the lung may be important for more effective influenza vaccinations

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers show that lung-resident memory B cells establish themselves in the lung soon after influenza infection in mice. Those lung memory B cells respond more quickly to produce antibodies against influenza after re-infection, and establishment requires a local antigen encounter in the lung.

Released:
5-Dec-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 704758

A New Approach to Studying the Flu

Washington University in St. Louis

Borrowing methods from another field, researchers can now study the ever changing nature if Influenza A.

Released:
3-Dec-2018 8:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704496

Study Predicts Novel Approach to Battling Influenza

University of California San Diego

Every year, three to five million people around the world suffer from severe illness caused by influenza, primarily during the months of November through March. Now a new study by researchers from several universities including UC San Diego, published earlier this month in ACS Central Science, suggests a novel approach for combatting this sometimes deadly virus.

Released:
27-Nov-2018 3:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Nov-2018 1:00 AM EST

Article ID: 704058

Does an “echo chamber” of information impede flu vaccination for children?

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Nearly a third of parents say they are not planning to get their child the vaccine this year, according to the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at the University of Michigan.

Released:
15-Nov-2018 8:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704027

The Medical Minute: Preventing shingles through vaccination

Penn State Health

While this season is usually associated with the flu vaccine, adults, especially those who are older than 50, should also consider getting a vaccine for shingles.

Released:
14-Nov-2018 2:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Nov-2018 11:30 AM EST

Article ID: 703346

Bacterial Pneumonia Far More Dangerous to the Heart Than Viral Pneumonia, Study Finds

Intermountain Medical Center

Heart complications in patients diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia are more serious than in patients diagnosed with viral pneumonia, according to new research from the Intermountain Heart Institute at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City.

Released:
5-Nov-2018 5:30 AM EST

Article ID: 703384

Tethered antibodies present a potential new approach to prevent influenza virus infections all season long

Scripps Research Institute

As co-leaders of an international collaboration, scientists at Scripps Research have discovered that tethering four antibodies together may be an effective strategy for neutralizing all types of influenza virus known to infect humans.

Released:
5-Nov-2018 12:05 PM EST

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