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Archeology, China, Eurasia, Fertile Crescent, Barley, Wheat, food globalization, Tibet, India, Domestication

Ancient Barley Took High Road to China, Changed to Summer Crop in Tibet

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First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis,

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Soybeans, Soybean, Sudden Death Syndrome, Plant Disease, Agriculture, Arabidopsis, Iowa State

New Research Details Genetic Resistance to Sudden Death Syndrome in Soybeans

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Incorporating a combination of genes from the model plant Arabidopsis may build high levels of resistance to sudden death syndrome in soybeans, according to research from an Iowa State University agronomist. A recently published study points to one gene in particular as a likely candidate to bolster resistance.

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Soy, , soy, Soybean, crop breeding, Agriculture, crop genetics

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Nov-2017 9:00 AM EST

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UF/IFAS Citrus REC Celebrates 100th Anniversary: See How Science Helps Agriculture

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University of Florida, citrus growers to celebrate a 100-year partnership.

Science

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Rain, Raindrops, Pathogens, Crops, Dispersal, splash, Grain, Wheat, Plants, Seungho Kim, Hope Gruszewski, Todd Gidley, David G. Schmale III, Sunghwan Jung, Virginia Tech, Division of Fluid Dynamics, Fluid Dynamics, American Physical Society, APS, DFD

Raindrops Splash Pathogens Onto Crops

Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses or fungi, cause harmful plant disease and often lead to the destruction of agricultural fields. With many possible dispersal methods, it can often be difficult to assess the damage of a pathogen’s impact before it’s too late. At the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, researchers from Virginia Tech will present their work on rain drop dispersal mechanisms of rust fungus on wheat plants.

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Water Quality Research, Phosphates, Nitrates, Heavy Metals, Duckweed, Upper Big Sioux River Watershed Project, U.S. Geological Survey, South Dakota Water Resources Institute, South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station

Aquatic Plant May Help Remove Contaminants From Lakes

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A tiny aquatic plant called duckweed might be a viable option for remove phosphorus, nitrates, nitrites and even heavy metals from lakes, ponds and slow-moving waterbodies.

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Florida First Detectors Help ID Invasive Plant Pests Before They Spread

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Florida has the most invasive species of any state in the country, and half of the insects, reptiles, arachnids and crustaceans imported into the United States come through Florida ports, University of Florida experts say. So, UF/IFAS has teamed up with government agencies to create a program to teach the public how to identify these insects before they become prolific.

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Thanksgiving Dinner, Food research, Agricultural, Sustaibability

Soils and Your Thanksgiving Meal

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Did you know soil scientists are making your Thanksgiving dinner more sustainable? The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) November 15 Soils Matter blog explains research to make cranberries, poultry litter, and sweet potatoes better for the environment.

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Are Petite Poplars the Future of Biofuels? UW Studies Say Yes

A University of Washington team is trying to make poplar a viable competitor in the biofuels market by testing the production of younger poplar trees that could be harvested more frequently — after only two or three years — instead of the usual 10- to 20-year cycle.

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intercropping, Sorgh, Groundnut, Sahel, Fertilizer, international agriculture

Filling Intercropping Info Gap

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In some parts of Africa, farmers intercrop sorghum – a grain – and peanuts. But they face a major information gap. There hasn’t been much research on optimal levels of fertilizer use for intercropping sorghum and peanuts in these areas. A new study has filled this information gap. Researchers from Niger, Mali, and the United States have developed a method to help farmers determine how much fertilizer to apply when intercropping.







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