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Newswise: Scurvy is still a thing in Canada

Scurvy is still a thing in Canada

McMaster University

McMaster University researchers surveyed the data of patients of Hamilton’s two hospital systems over nine years and found 52 with low Vitamin C levels. This included 13 patients who could be diagnosed as having scurvy, and an additional 39 who tested positive for scurvy but did not have documented symptoms. Among those with scurvy, some were related to alcohol use disorder or to bariatric surgery but the majority were related to other causes of malnutrition such as persistent vomiting, purposeful dietary restrictions, mental illness, social isolation and dependence on others for food.

Channels: Alcohol and Alcoholism, Blood, Digestive Disorders, Mental Health, Surgery, Local - Canada,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 4:55 PM EST
Embargo will expire:
20-Jan-2020 3:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
17-Jan-2020 10:05 AM EST

EMBARGOED

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Research Results
Embargo will expire:
22-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
17-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST

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If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Research Results
Newswise: JAMA editorial helps set record straight on unproven sepsis therapy
  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jan-2020 6:30 AM EST

JAMA editorial helps set record straight on unproven sepsis therapy

University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC)

The Jan. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) features an important study about sepsis with an accompanying editorial by a University of Nebraska Medical Center expert. The study and editorial sets the record straight on an unproven therapy some physicians use to treat sepsis, a deadly infectious disease. The editorial, written by Andre Kalil, M.D., M.P.H., professor of infectious diseases in the UNMC Department of Internal Medicine, writes in support of the new and rigorous international study based on a randomized clinical trial in Australia, published in the same issue. The editorial appears in the Jan. 17 online issue and also will appear in the Feb. 4 print edition.

Channels: Clinical Trials, Healthcare, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, JAMA, All Journal News, Blood,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 11:50 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Cancer study may accidentally help researchers create usable blood stem cells

Cancer study may accidentally help researchers create usable blood stem cells

University of Colorado Cancer Center

University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows healthy form of the leukemia-causing gene MLL may push pluripotent stem cells (which have proven difficult to use in human patients) to become durable hematopoietic stem cells (which are usable in patients, but have until now been impossible to make).

Channels: All Journal News, Blood, Cancer, Cell Biology, Stem Cells, Grant Funded News,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST
Policy
Newswise: Partnership with China Prompts Change in Care for High-Risk Type of Leukemia
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST

Partnership with China Prompts Change in Care for High-Risk Type of Leukemia

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Researchers from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Chinese Children’s Cancer Group led the first randomized, Phase III clinical trial comparing targeted therapies for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) driven by the Philadelphia chromosome. Results showed that the drug dasatinib provides more benefit than the standard of care, which led to changes in the way this leukemia is treated. The findings were reported today in JAMA Oncology.

Channels: Cancer, Children's Health, Clinical Trials, China News, Blood, JAMA, All Journal News,

Released:
14-Jan-2020 12:00 PM EST
Research Results

Special delivery: McMaster physicists design ‘super-human’ red blood cells to deliver drugs to specific targets within the body

McMaster University

A team of physicists from McMaster University has developed a process to modify red blood cells so they can be used to distribute drugs throughout the body, which could specifically target infections or treat catastrophic diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer’s.

Channels: All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Blood, Cancer, Cell Biology, Pharmaceuticals,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Blood Stem Cell Research

Blood Stem Cell Research

University of Delaware

A nanoparticle carrier system that could eliminate the need for bone marrow transplants, which are both expensive and difficult for patients to undergo. The University of Delaware's Emily Day, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering, is developing a platform that could treat stem cells directly without the need to remove them from the body.

Channels: AIDS and HIV, Biotech, Blood, Healthcare, Stem Cells,

Released:
15-Jan-2020 2:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Mutations in Donors’ Stem Cells May Cause Problems for Cancer Patients
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Mutations in Donors’ Stem Cells May Cause Problems for Cancer Patients

Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that extremely rare, harmful genetic mutations present in healthy donors’ stem cells — though not causing health problems in the donors — may be passed on to cancer patients receiving stem cell transplants, potentially creating health problems for the recipients. Among the concerns are heart damage, graft-versus-host disease and possible new leukemias.

Channels: Blood, Cancer, Stem Cells, Transplantation, All Journal News,

Released:
14-Jan-2020 12:00 PM EST
Announcement
  • Embargo expired:
    14-Jan-2020 12:05 AM EST

Elevated Leukemia Incidence Is Found in World Trade Center Rescue and Recovery Workers

Mount Sinai Health System

Responders who worked at the World Trade Center site after the attacks on September 11, 2001, have an increased overall cancer incidence compared to the general population, particularly in thyroid cancer, prostate cancer, and, for the first time ever reported, leukemia, according to a Mount Sinai study published in JNCI Cancer Spectrum in January.

Channels: Blood, Cancer, Environmental Health, Pollution, Public Health, All Journal News,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 1:10 PM EST
Research Results


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