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Newswise: Machine-learning competition boosts earthquake prediction capabilities

Article ID: 716022

Machine-learning competition boosts earthquake prediction capabilities

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Three teams who applied novel machine learning methods to successfully predict the timing of earthquakes from historic seismic data are splitting $50,000 in prize money from an open, online Kaggle competition hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and its partners.

Released:
18-Jul-2019 1:00 PM EDT
Newswise: Chaos Theory Produces Map for Predicting the Paths of Particles Emitted Into the Atmosphere
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jul-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 715771

Chaos Theory Produces Map for Predicting the Paths of Particles Emitted Into the Atmosphere

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Floating air particles following disasters and other geological events can have a lasting impact on life on Earth, and a new model drawing on chaos theory looks to help predict how these particles move, with an eye toward applications for geoengineering. Using available wind data, Tímea Haszpra developed a model for following particles as they travel around the globe. Using it, she has generated maps that can be used to predict how particles will be dispersed above the world.

Released:
12-Jul-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Newswise: 205854_web.jpg

Article ID: 715555

Auroral crackling sounds are related to the electromagnetic resonances of the Earth

Aalto University

The study is a continuation of a hypothesis that Unto K. Laine, Professor Emeritus, published three years ago on the origin of the sounds heard during the displays of the Northern Lights.

Released:
10-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 713940

Augustana University Professor’s Research Leads to Surprising Mating Decision in Butterfly Species

Augustana University, South Dakota

The males of one species of butterfly are more attracted to females that are active, not necessarily what they look like, according to a recent research conducted at Augustana University.The paper, “Behaviour before beauty: Signal weighting during mate selection in the butterfly Papilio polytes,” found that males of the species noticed the activity levels of potential female mates, not their markings.

Released:
8-Jul-2019 4:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Ancient Saharan Seaway Illustrates How Earth’s Climate and Creatures Can Undergo Extreme Change
  • Embargo expired:
    8-Jul-2019 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 715267

Ancient Saharan Seaway Illustrates How Earth’s Climate and Creatures Can Undergo Extreme Change

Stony Brook University

A new paper to be published in the Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History integrates 20 years of research that describes the ancient Trans-Saharan Seaway of Africa and contains the first reconstructions of extinct aquatic species in their habitats along the seaway.

Released:
2-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Newswise: 205339_web.jpg

Article ID: 715332

Winter monsoons became stronger during geomagnetic reversal

Kobe University

New evidence suggests that high-energy particles from space known as galactic cosmic rays affect the Earth's climate by increasing cloud cover, causing an "umbrella effect".

Released:
3-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Water drives explosive eruptions; here’s why magmas are wetter than we thought

Article ID: 715294

Water drives explosive eruptions; here’s why magmas are wetter than we thought

Washington University in St. Louis

Volatile elements in magma, primarily water, drive explosive volcanic eruptions. The tricky part is determining just how much volatile content was present before the eruption took place. This is especially difficult when the only evidence scientists have to go on is the end product after all the volatiles have been lost.

Released:
2-Jul-2019 4:05 PM EDT
Newswise: 205152_web.jpg

Article ID: 715283

New study solves mystery of salt buildup on bottom of Dead Sea

American Geophysical Union (AGU)

New research explains why salt crystals are piling up on the deepest parts of the Dead Sea's floor, a finding that could help scientists understand how large salt deposits formed in Earth's geologic past.

Released:
2-Jul-2019 2:05 PM EDT

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