Breaking News:

Floods

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
fbshare-Floods

Showing results

110 of 362

Article ID: 711736

Engineers Study Failed Levees, Research Potential Solutions

Iowa State University

Cassandra Rutherford, an Iowa State geotechnical engineer, has inspected failed levees along Midwestern rivers. And now she's working with other engineers to develop technologies that could improve levee performance.

Released:
22-Apr-2019 4:25 PM EDT
debra_javeline_300x.jpg

Article ID: 710904

Many coastal homes are unprotected from hurricanes and homeowners have no intention of retrofitting, study finds

University of Notre Dame

According to the Notre Dame study, 62 percent of coastal homeowners are not considering taking any action to reduce the vulnerabilities of their homes or enhance protections against future hurricanes.

Released:
8-Apr-2019 10:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

MOST_logo.png

Article ID: 710593

Researchers use artificial intelligence to design flood evacuation plans

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Artificial intelligence may soon help transportation agencies and first responders determine the best evacuation routes during floods such as those affecting portions of Missouri and the Midwest, thanks to the work of researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology. Drs. Suzanna Long and Steve Corns of Missouri S&T’s engineering management and systems engineering department are using a form of AI known as deep learning to develop forecasting tools to integrate water level rate of change as part of evacuation routing planning in flood-prone areas.

Released:
2-Apr-2019 8:05 AM EDT
PredictingHope.jpg

Article ID: 709208

Predicting Hope

University of Oklahoma, Gallogly College of Engineering

The devastation of the Peruvian floods of March 2017 caused native and University of Oklahoma Electrical and Computer Engineering Assistant Professor, Salazar-Cerreno, to look for ways to apply his expertise to help improve weather decision making and warnings.

Released:
7-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EST
BER-2019-02-j-lrg.jpg

Article ID: 708886

A Simplified Way to Predict the Function of Microbial Communities

Department of Energy, Office of Science

A pioneering study offers an easier approach to study how microbes work and could help scientists advance models of the cycling of elements and nutrients in frequently flooded soils.

Released:
6-Mar-2019 2:55 PM EST
Bandino.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    1-Mar-2019 7:00 AM EST

Article ID: 708244

As Floodwaters Rise, So Do Dermatologic Conditions

American Academy of Dermatology

As more frequent and intense flooding events have occurred in recent years, both disaster victims and relief workers have experienced significant dermatologic problems.

Released:
26-Feb-2019 8:00 AM EST
28898040800_e5ccfc011b_k.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    13-Feb-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 707711

In Disasters, Twitter Influencers Get Out-Tweeted

University of Vermont

A first-of-its-kind study on Twitter use during 5 of the costliest U.S. natural disasters offers potentially life-saving insights. The research, in PLOS ONE, finds that Twitter users with small networks (100-200 followers) increase activity more than those with larger networks in these situations. It also finds that each disaster type (hurricanes, tornadoes, floods) has a unique pattern of social media use.

Released:
7-Feb-2019 11:30 AM EST

Showing results

110 of 362

Chat now!