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Article ID: 693184

California's Next Major Earthquake Could Cause $100 Billion in Losses, Strand 20,000 in Elevators

University of Colorado Boulder

Northern California's next big earthquake could kill 800 people and cause more than $100 billion in economic losses. One in four buildings in the San Francisco Bay Area could be unsafe to re-enter after a major earthquake or would be otherwise limited in their usability.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 4:05 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 691244

Professor Discovers Answers About Seismic Shifts Deep in the Earth

New Mexico State University (NMSU)

The largest and most-devastating earthquakes and volcano eruptions occur where one tectonic plate is shifted underneath another one. A New Mexico State University researcher authored a paper published recently in “Nature Communications” that looks at the so-called subduction zones where the plates become “slabs” and sink into the Earth's mantle.

Released:
15-Mar-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691226

Garnet Reveals Source of Water to Fuel Powerful Volcanoes and Earthquakes

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

By applying a new spectroscopy technique to garnet containing fragments of quartz, metamorphic petrologist Frank Spear of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute thinks he’s found the source of water that fuels earthquakes in volcanoes in subduction zones.

Released:
15-Mar-2018 4:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 689010

Hayward Fault Earthquake Simulations Increase Fidelity of Ground Motions

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

In the next 30 years, there is a one-in-three chance that the Hayward fault will rupture with a 6.7 magnitude or higher earthquake, according to the United States Geologic Survey (USGS). Such an earthquake will cause widespread damage to structures, transportation and utilities, as well as economic and social disruption in the East Bay.

Released:
8-Feb-2018 5:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Feb-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688727

Oklahoma’s Earthquakes Strongly Linked to Wastewater Injection Depth, Finds Study

University of Southampton

A huge increase in the number of man-made earthquakes in Oklahoma, USA, is strongly linked to the depth at which wastewater from the oil and gas industry is injected into the ground, according to a new study involving the University of Southampton.

Released:
31-Jan-2018 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 687728

Further Reducing Injections of Oilfield Wastewater Underground Can Prevent Larger Earthquakes

Virginia Tech

The new study shows that locations that experienced earthquakes are tied in proximity and timeliness to mass waste water injection sites. Further, the study indicates that tracking annual data on the injection well locations can help predict how corresponding earthquake activity will change. This new finding builds on previous studies showing that earthquake activity increases when wastewater injections increase.

Released:
10-Jan-2018 7:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 686248

Earthquake Codes Developed by SDSC, SDSU, SCEC Used in 2017 Gordon Bell Prize Research

University of California San Diego

A Chinese team of researchers awarded this year’s prestigious Gordon Bell prize for simulating the devastating 1976 earthquake in Tangshan, China, used an open-source code developed by researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at UC San Diego and San Diego State University with support from the Southern California Earthquake Center.

Released:
5-Dec-2017 4:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 686181

Dark Fiber: Using Sensors Beneath Our Feet to Tell Us About Earthquakes, Water, and Other Geophysical Phenomenon

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown for the first time that dark fiber – the vast network of unused fiber-optic cables installed throughout the country and the world – can be used as sensors for detecting earthquakes, the presence of groundwater, changes in permafrost conditions, and a variety of other subsurface activity.

Released:
5-Dec-2017 10:00 AM EST

Showing results 1120 of 378

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