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Newswise: Down on Vitamin D? It could be the cause of chronic inflammation
Released: 7-Aug-2022 2:30 PM EDT
Down on Vitamin D? It could be the cause of chronic inflammation
University of South Australia

World-first genetic research from the University of South Australia shows a direct link between low levels of vitamin D and high levels of inflammation, providing an important biomarker to identify people at higher risk of or severity of chronic illnesses with an inflammatory component.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 6:20 PM EDT
When a task adds more steps, this circuit helps you notice
Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT

Life is full of processes to learn and then relearn when they become more elaborate. One day you log in to an app with just a password, then the next day you also need a code texted to you.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 6:20 PM EDT
Wrist-worn devices are shown by mass general researchers to be cost-effective for screening of atrial fibrillation
Massachusetts General Hospital

A study simulating a population of 30 million people 65 and older found that wrist-wearable devices are more cost-effective than traditional electrocardiograms and pulse palpation for atrial fibrillation (AF) screening, and that they are associated with a reduction in stroke incidence

Released: 5-Aug-2022 6:05 PM EDT
New York National Guard COVID response is now the largest domestic mobilization in U.S. history
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

Beginning in early March 2020, military forces in the State of New York, comprising the Army National Guard, Air National Guard, Naval Militia, and State Guard, with contributions from the Army Corps of Engineers, mobilized to respond to the coronavirus pandemic.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 6:05 PM EDT
Study finds full-occupancy, in-person teaching did not lead to SARS-CoV-2 in-class transmission at Boston University
Boston University School of Medicine

Is there evidence of in-class transmission of SARS-CoV-2 on a university campus that has mandated vaccination and masking? The answer is no.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 4:05 PM EDT
The many ways nature nurtures human well-being
University of Tokyo

A systematic review of 301 academic articles on “cultural ecosystem services” has enabled researchers to identify how these nonmaterial contributions from nature are linked to and significantly affect human well-being.

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Released: 5-Aug-2022 4:00 PM EDT
Common weed may be ‘super plant’ that holds key to drought-resistant crops
Yale University

A common weed harbors important clues about how to create drought resistant crops in a world beset by climate change.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 3:30 PM EDT
Worrying finding in California's multi-billion-dollar climate initiative reveals problem with using forests to offset CO2 emissions
Frontiers

Researchers have found that California’s forest carbon buffer pool, designed to ensure the durability of the state’s multi-billion-dollar carbon offset program, is severely undercapitalized.

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Released: 5-Aug-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Preterm birth delay drugs safe for global reduction in neonatal death
University of Birmingham

Women around the world should be able to access the best medical treatments that help to delay preterm births and improve neonatal outcomes, new research suggests.

Newswise: UNLV Research: No, the Human Brain Did Not Shrink 3,000 Years Ago
Released: 5-Aug-2022 3:00 PM EDT
UNLV Research: No, the Human Brain Did Not Shrink 3,000 Years Ago
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

In new paper, UNLV-led anthropology team balks at a widely held belief that modern humans experienced an evolutionary decrease in brain size.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 2:55 PM EDT
Children’s health will be negatively impacted by poorer fitness as global temperatures rise, new research shows
Taylor & Francis

Record levels of obesity and physical inactivity among children mean they are set to bear the brunt of poorer health effects from rising global temperatures – that’s the stark warning in a new comprehensive review of current studies on the topic.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 2:40 PM EDT
A brain mechanism underlying the evolution of anxiety
Tohoku University

Monoamine neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine play important roles in our cognitive and emotional functions.

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Released: 5-Aug-2022 2:30 PM EDT
Ragweed allergy: aggressiveness of pollen is determined by its place of origin and by the environment
Medical University of Vienna (MedUni Wien)

The different geographic and climatic regions from which ragweed pollen originates, as well as the degree of environmental pollution, may influence the severity of allergic reactions such as hay fever and asthma.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 2:20 PM EDT
How bat brains listen out for incoming signals during echolocation
Goethe University Frankfurt

Bats famously have an ultrasonic navigation system: they use their extremely sensitive hearing to orient themselves by emitting ultrasonic sounds and using the echoes that result to build up a picture of their environment.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Researchers Gain Insights Into the Genetic and Molecular Machinery that Predisposes Individuals to Alzheimer’s Disease
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers have achieved an unprecedented understanding of the genetic and molecular machinery in human microglia—immune cells that reside in the brain—that could provide valuable insights into how they contribute to the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The team’s findings were published in Nature Genetics.

Newswise: NIH first to develop 3D structure of twinkle protein
Released: 5-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
NIH first to develop 3D structure of twinkle protein
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have developed a three-dimensional structure that allows them to see how and where disease mutations on the twinkle protein can lead to mitochondrial diseases. The protein is involved in helping cells use energy our bodies convert from food. Prior to the development of this 3D structure, researchers only had models and were unable to determine how these mutations contribute to disease. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of inherited conditions that affect 1 in 5,000 people and have very few treatments.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 1:55 PM EDT
Smog increases the risk of adverse health effects in pregnant mothers and babies
De Gruyter

Mild exposure to common smog pollutants such as inhalable airborne particles and carbon monoxide during pregnancy results in adverse maternal and fetal health outcomes, a new study of women in China finds.

Newswise: Fancy a side of 3D printed carrots and crickets with your meal?
Released: 5-Aug-2022 1:35 PM EDT
Fancy a side of 3D printed carrots and crickets with your meal?
Singapore University of Technology and Design

As the global population continues to age and grow, the demand for protein-rich food is also expected to increase concurrently. This has also caused concerns on increasing greenhouse gases, land and water consumption associated with the conventional rearing of animals for food.

Newswise: New recommendations aim to ease patient access to lung cancer clinical trials
Released: 5-Aug-2022 1:05 PM EDT
New recommendations aim to ease patient access to lung cancer clinical trials
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A clinical trial is only as powerful as its participants. For years, researchers have struggled to fill clinical trials and enroll sufficiently diverse groups of patients for results to reflect the broader population, in part because of stringent guidelines on who can participate.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 12:55 PM EDT
Researchers unveil key processes in marine microbial evolution
Instituto de Ciencias del Mar (ICM) - CSIC

A study published recently in the prestigious journal Nature Ecology and Evolution has unveiled some of the key processes in marine microbial evolution.

Newswise: srikanthFluoroDOTrecord.jpg
Released: 5-Aug-2022 12:55 PM EDT
‘Simple yet powerful’: Seeing cell secretion like never before
Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University in St. Louis researchers have developed a novel method for visualizing the proteins secreted by cells with stunning resolution, making it the James Webb version for visualizing single cell protein secretion.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 12:50 PM EDT
MSU researchers show that locusts can ‘sniff’ out human cancer
Michigan State University

Researchers at Michigan State University have shown that locusts can not only “smell” the difference between cancer cells and healthy cells, but they can also distinguish between different cancer cell lines. 

Released: 5-Aug-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Exploring arcobacter risk to the food industry and human health
University of the Basque Country

The increase in the discovery of Arcobacter in food samples of all types raises public health concerns, as very little is known as yet about the pathogenic potential of Arcobacter species, and the few studies that have been carried out show a large number of host species and transmission routes.

Newswise: No Trace of Dark Matter Halos
Released: 5-Aug-2022 11:55 AM EDT
No Trace of Dark Matter Halos
University of Bonn

Dwarf galaxies are small, faint galaxies that can usually be found in galaxy clusters or near larger galaxies.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 11:05 AM EDT
How learning about wellbeing can benefit university students’ own wellbeing
Swansea University

Studying wellbeing science as part of their courses could be a key way of improving how today’s students cope with the barrage of stressors they face, according to research.

4-Aug-2022 1:30 PM EDT
Fewer rural early-onset Alzheimer’s patients see specialists
Ohio State University

Rural Americans suffering from early-onset Alzheimer’s are less likely than city dwellers to be seen by specialists and receive tests that can benefit both them and their families, new research has found.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 10:45 AM EDT
Children’s headaches and mental health worsened during pandemic
Children's National Hospital

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many pediatric patients who suffer from headaches have experienced more frequent headaches and worsening anxiety and mood, and a new study finds links to stress, decreased physical activity and increased screen time.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 10:35 AM EDT
Study Reverses Long-Held Ideas About Relationship Among Diabetes, Fat and Cardiovascular Disease
Joslin Diabetes Center

In a paper published in Circulation Research, scientists describe a series of studies designed to determine the relationship among insulin, fats and the vascular system.

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This news release is embargoed until 8-Aug-2022 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 5-Aug-2022 10:15 AM EDT

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Newswise: Machine Learning Reveals Hidden Components of X-Ray Pulses
Released: 5-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Machine Learning Reveals Hidden Components of X-Ray Pulses
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Ultrafast pulses from X-ray lasers reveal how atoms move at femtosecond timescales, but measuring the properties of the pulses is challenging. A new approach trains neural networks to analyze the pulses. Starting from low-resolution measurements, the neural networks reveal finer details with each pulse, and they can analyze pulses millions of times faster than previous methods.

Released: 5-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Nutrition solution can help heat-stressed cows as US warms
Cornell University

Rising temperatures pose major challenges to the dairy industry – a Holstein’s milk production can decline 30 to 70% in warm weather – but a new Cornell University-led study has found a nutrition-based solution to restore milk production during heat-stress events, while also pinpointing the cause of the decline.

Newswise: New study calculates retreat of glacier edges in Alaska’s Kenai Fjords National Park
1-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
New study calculates retreat of glacier edges in Alaska’s Kenai Fjords National Park
University of Washington

A new study measured 38 years of change for glaciers in Kenai Fjords National Park, which lies south of Anchorage, and found that 13 of 19 glaciers show substantial retreat, four are relatively stable, and two have advanced. It also finds trends in which glacier types are disappearing fastest.

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This news release is embargoed until 8-Aug-2022 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 4-Aug-2022 6:05 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 8-Aug-2022 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 4-Aug-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Houston Methodist study finds new chronic rhinitis treatment could be game changer
Houston Methodist

A new study at Houston Methodist shows that that a new temperature-controlled radiofrequency intervention is a safe and effective way to improve symptoms of chronic rhinitis. Chronic rhinitis involves symptoms such as a near constant runny nose, congestion, as well as nasal and throat itching and sneezing. In addition to costing billions of dollars each year in healthcare costs, the associated symptoms have significant and severe impacts on people’s quality of life and ability to go about day-to-day activities.

Released: 4-Aug-2022 4:20 PM EDT
How microglia contribute to Alzheimer’s disease
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease is a reduction in the firing of some neurons in the brain, which contributes to the cognitive decline that patients experience. A new study from MIT shows how a type of cells called microglia contribute to this slowdown of neuron activity.

Released: 4-Aug-2022 4:15 PM EDT
Large-scale study of Brazilian wetlands ramps up evidence that biodiversity loss undermines ecosystem functioning
Queen Mary University of London

A new study analyses human impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in 72 lakes distributed across four large neotropical wetlands of Brazil – Amazon, Araguaia, Pantanal and Paraná. The research spans a 3.7million km gradient of human activities in Brazil.

Released: 4-Aug-2022 4:10 PM EDT
An Easier and Safer Way to Synthesize Medicines
Ohio State University

Despite being some of the most versatile building blocks in organic chemistry, compounds called carbenes can be too hot to handle. In the lab, chemists often avoid using these highly reactive molecules due to how explosive they can be. Yet in a new study, published today in the journal Science, researchers from The Ohio State University report on a new, safer method to turn these short-lived, high-energy molecules from much more stable ones.

Released: 4-Aug-2022 3:45 PM EDT
Tracking Nitrogen Pollution
University of California, Santa Barbara

Tropical coastal ecosystems are among the most biodiverse areas on Earth. And they’re also on the front lines of effects caused by human activity.

Newswise: Hyaluranic acid, a naturally occurring compound, awakens stem cells to repair damaged muscle
Released: 4-Aug-2022 3:35 PM EDT
Hyaluranic acid, a naturally occurring compound, awakens stem cells to repair damaged muscle
Ottawa Hospital

A new study published in the journal Science reveals a unique form of cell communication that controls muscle repair.

Released: 4-Aug-2022 3:35 PM EDT
Only 1 in 5 Syrian children in refugee camps show resilience to mental health problems
Queen Mary University of London

Many more Syrian children living in refugee camps appear to be living with mental health problems than previously thought, according to new in-the-field research led by Queen Mary University of London.

Released: 4-Aug-2022 3:30 PM EDT
Genetic findings offer opportunity for personalized heart failure treatment
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Heart failure is a common and devastating disorder for which there is no cure. Many cardiomyopathies —conditions that make it difficult for the heart to pump blood such as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) — can lead to heart failure, but treatments for patients with heart failure do not take these distinct conditions into account.

Released: 4-Aug-2022 3:25 PM EDT
New technology aims toward earlier detection of hepatocellular carcinoma
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

New research led by UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center investigators suggests that new technology in development may lead to a better way to detect early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

Newswise: These Baboons Borrowed a Third of Their Genes From Their Cousins
Released: 4-Aug-2022 3:20 PM EDT
These Baboons Borrowed a Third of Their Genes From Their Cousins
Duke University

New genetic analyses of wild baboons in southern Kenya reveals that most of them carry traces of hybridization in their DNA. As a result of interbreeding, about a third of their genetic makeup consists of genes from another, closely-related species.

Released: 4-Aug-2022 3:15 PM EDT
Utah’s Consumer Sentiment continues to fall in July
University of Utah

Utah’s consumer sentiment fell in July, according to the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute’s Survey of Utah Consumers.


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