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Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Carb-eating bacteria under viral threat
University of California, Riverside

Strictly speaking, humans cannot digest complex carbohydrates -- that's the job of bacteria in our large intestines. UC Riverside scientists have just discovered a new group of viruses that attack these bacteria.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:10 PM EDT
Dementia caregivers' stress leads to sleep deprivation
Edith Cowan University

New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found 94 per cent of Australians caring for a loved one with dementia are sleep deprived.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:50 PM EDT
COVID-19 infects majority of bad dreams -- study
Frontiers

COVID-19 has turned 2020 into a nightmare for many people, as they struggle with health problems, economic uncertainty and other challenges.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Decent living for all does not have to cost the Earth
University of Leeds

Global energy consumption in 2050 could be reduced to the levels of the 1960s and still provide a decent standard of living for a population three times larger, according to a new study.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Black Lives Also Matter in Cancer Care
University of Colorado Cancer Center

Studies have long reported that Black cancer patients have poorer outcomes than their white counterparts.

Newswise: 15-Year Trend Persists in Disparate Insulin Pump Use in Children
Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:05 PM EDT
15-Year Trend Persists in Disparate Insulin Pump Use in Children
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Insulin pumps are widely used in the management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and reviews have shown insulin pump therapy to be associated with improved glycemic control, fewer severe hypoglycemia events, and improved quality of life. Yet, non-Hispanic white children (NHW) are more than twice as likely as non-Hispanic Black children (NHB) to use this technology.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Strict parenting may cause adolescents to act out
University of Georgia

The next time you’re yelling at your defiant teen, you might consider that you may be doing more harm than good, according to new research from the University of Georgia.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Being a Selfish Jerk Doesn’t Get You Ahead, Research Finds
University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business

The evidence is in: Nice guys and gals don’t finish last, and being a selfish jerk doesn’t get you ahead. That’s the clear conclusion from research that tracked disagreeable people—those with selfish, combative, manipulative personalities—from college or graduate school to where they landed in their careers about 14 years later.

30-Sep-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Researchers call for loss of smell to be recognized globally as a symptom of COVID-19
PLOS

Four out of five people experiencing the recent loss of smell and/or taste tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies—and of those who tested positive, 40 percent did not have cough or fever, reports a new study in PLOS Medicine by Prof. Rachel Batterham at University College London and colleagues.

Newswise:Video Embedded how-cells-build-organisms
VIDEO
28-Sep-2020 4:55 PM EDT
How Cells Build Organisms
Harvard Medical School

Harvard scientists discovered a key control mechanism that cells use to self-organize in early embryonic development. The findings shed light on a process fundamental to multicellular life and open new avenues for improved tissue and organ engineering .

Newswise: Building an antiracist lab: Scientists offer steps to take action now
30-Sep-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Building an antiracist lab: Scientists offer steps to take action now
DePaul University

“Ten simple rules for building an antiracist lab,” is the subject of a paper by scientists at DePaul University in Chicago and the University of California in Merced. The paper is published Oct. 1 in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Population distribution can greatly impact COVID-19 spread, UCI-led study finds
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 1, 2020 — Uneven population distribution can significantly impact the severity and timing of COVID-19 infections within a city or county, leading individual communities to have vastly different experiences with the pandemic, according to a recent study led by the University of California, Irvine. Findings published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences show that the heterogeneous spatial features of interpersonal connections may produce dramatic local variations in exposures to those with the illness.

Newswise: 244645_web.jpg
Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:55 PM EDT
High risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with COVID-19
Medical University of Vienna (MedUni Wien)

In a systematic review of the worldwide published data on "Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in COVID-19 patients", Cihan Ay, Stephan Nopp, and Florian Moik from the Department of Medicine I, Clinical Division of Haematology and Haemostaseology, now for the first time, provide an in-depth analysis on the risk of VTE in patients hospitalised for COVID-19.

Newswise: Study reveals element in blood is part of human — and hibernating squirrel — stress response
Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Study reveals element in blood is part of human — and hibernating squirrel — stress response
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

A new study published in the journal Critical Care Explorations shows for the first time that part of the stress response in people and animals involves increasing the levels of a naturally circulating element in blood. The discovery demonstrates a biological mechanism that rapidly responds to severe physiologic stress and potentially serves to protect us from further damage due to life-threatening conditions.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 5-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 12:30 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 5-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 5-Oct-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 12:25 PM EDT

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Why writing by hand makes kids smarter
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Professor Audrey van der Meer at NTNU believes that national guidelines should be put into place to ensure that children receive at least a minimum of handwriting training.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 6-Oct-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 11:55 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 6-Oct-2020 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

30-Sep-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Mud-slurping chinless ancestors had all the moves
University of Bristol

A team of researchers, led by the University of Bristol, has revealed our most ancient ancestors were ecologically diverse, despite lacking jaws and paired fins.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 5-Oct-2020 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 10:45 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 5-Oct-2020 4:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Using Machine Learning to Predict Pediatric Brain Injury
Released: 1-Oct-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Using Machine Learning to Predict Pediatric Brain Injury
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Oct. 1, 2020 – When newborn babies or children with heart or lung distress are struggling to survive, doctors often turn to a form of life support that uses artificial lungs. This treatment, called Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO), has been credited with saving countless lives. But in some cases, it can also lead to long-term brain injury.

Newswise: Vaccine Opposition Online Uniting Around ‘Civil Liberties’ Argument
1-Oct-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Vaccine Opposition Online Uniting Around ‘Civil Liberties’ Argument
George Washington University

Anti-vaccination discourse on Facebook increased in volume over the last decade, coalescing around the argument that refusing to vaccinate is a civil right, according to a study published today in the American Journal of Public Health.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Study finds women want more information from religious hospitals on their reproductive care restrictions
University of Chicago Medical Center

Religious hospital policies that restrict reproductive health care are poorly understood by patients, according to new bioethics research from UChicago Medicine.

Newswise: Zika infections drastically underreported during 2015 epidemic
Released: 1-Oct-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Zika infections drastically underreported during 2015 epidemic
University of Notre Dame

More than 100 million infections of Zika virus within Central and South America and the Caribbean went undetected between 2015 and 2018, according to a new study.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Scientists at Texas Biomed develop new tool to aid in the development of SARS-CoV-2 antivirals and vaccines
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Researchers apply a novel reverse genetics approach to create recombinant SARS-CoV-2San Antonio, Texas (October 1, 2020) – Researchers at Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) recently published findings from an innovative SARS-CoV-2 study that will assist in the development of new vaccines and antivirals for COVID-19.

Newswise: Rutgers Cancer Institute Research: Breastfeeding is Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age
Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:40 AM EDT
Rutgers Cancer Institute Research: Breastfeeding is Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Is breastfeeding safe and possible for mothers who have a history of breast cancer? Investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey recently explored this question by conducting a systematic review on the feasibility and challenges of breastfeeding among breast cancer survivors of reproductive age.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:40 AM EDT
Two molecular handshakes for hearing
Ohio State University

Scientists have mapped and simulated filaments in the inner ear at the atomic level, a discovery that shed lights on how the inner ear works and that could help researchers learn more about how and why people lose the ability to hear.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:15 AM EDT
How (and Why) Steak-umm Became a Social Media Phenomenon During the Pandemic
North Carolina State University

A new study outlines how a brand of frozen meat products took social media by storm – and what other brands can learn from the phenomenon.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Not All Patients Are Offered the Same Effective Breast Cancer Treatment
Thomas Jefferson University

Socioeconomic status and race could play a role in treatment decisions, according to new research.

Newswise: It ain’t great to stay up late: the perils of a late bedtime for kids and parents
Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:00 AM EDT
It ain’t great to stay up late: the perils of a late bedtime for kids and parents
University of South Australia

Staying up late is often a special treat for the kids but make it a habit and it could be damaging to their health and wellbeing, according to new research from the University of South Australia.

30-Sep-2020 7:20 PM EDT
Sleep apnea treatment reduces heart problems in patients with prediabetes, new study finds
University of Chicago Medical Center

Research from the University of Chicago Medicine finds people with prediabetes and obstructive sleep apnea can reduce their daytime resting heart rate and risk of cardiovascular disease by using a CPAP device.

25-Sep-2020 9:05 PM EDT
Massachusetts Study Examines Relationships Between Staffing, Sepsis Rates
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)

Sepsis rates at a sample of Massachusetts hospitals were significantly lower with increased nurse staffing and intensivist hours, according to new research published in the October issue of Critical Care Nurse.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 5:05 AM EDT
Relationships at home during the COVID-19 pandemic continue to improve, reports USC Center for the Digital Future
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism

In spite of the stress from COVID-19 and stay-at-home restrictions, many Americans continue to say the relationships with their spouses and children have improved during the pandemic, a study by the USC Center for the Digital Future (CDF) has found.

Newswise: From San Diego to Italy, Study Suggests Wisdom can Protect Against Loneliness
28-Sep-2020 4:40 PM EDT
From San Diego to Italy, Study Suggests Wisdom can Protect Against Loneliness
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and University of Rome La Sapienza examined middle-aged and older adults in San Diego and Cilento, Italy and found loneliness and wisdom had a strong negative correlation. The wiser the person, the less lonely they were.

Newswise: The proof is in the pudding:
Released: 30-Sep-2020 9:05 PM EDT
The proof is in the pudding:
University of South Australia

As Australia’s aged care sector continues to be scrutinised, researchers at the University of South Australia show that plain solutions are often the best, with a new study finding that aged care residents can improve their nutrition intake simply by increasing their meal sizes.

Newswise: Medical Mystery: ‘Creeping Fat’ in Crohn’s Patients Linked to Bacteria
Released: 30-Sep-2020 9:05 PM EDT
Medical Mystery: ‘Creeping Fat’ in Crohn’s Patients Linked to Bacteria
Cedars-Sinai

Cedars-Sinai researchers might have solved a mystery surrounding Crohn's disease: Why does fat appear to migrate into patients' small intestines?

Newswise: Computer Model Shows How COVID-19 Could Lead to Runaway Inflammation
Released: 30-Sep-2020 9:05 PM EDT
Computer Model Shows How COVID-19 Could Lead to Runaway Inflammation
Cedars-Sinai

New research from the University of Pittsburgh and Cedars-Sinai digs into the question: Why do some people with COVID-19 develop severe inflammation? The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Newswise: Cardiac Arrest, Poor Survival Rates Common in Sickest Patients with COVID-19
29-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Cardiac Arrest, Poor Survival Rates Common in Sickest Patients with COVID-19
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Study shows critically ill patients with the novel coronavirus have high rates of cardiac arrest and poor outcomes even after CPR, an effect most strongly seen in older patients.

Released: 30-Sep-2020 6:25 PM EDT
Study reveals unnecessary stress testing performed prior to knee and hip replacement surgeries
University of Chicago Medical Center

A new study shows the overall rate of preoperative stress testing for hip and knee replacements has been decreasing consistently since 2006, but that many stress tests performed each year were unnecessary.

Newswise: Astronomers Take a Closer Look at the Centers of Galaxies
Released: 30-Sep-2020 6:10 PM EDT
Astronomers Take a Closer Look at the Centers of Galaxies
University of California San Diego

New study recently published in The Astrophysical Journal reveals a diverse range of types and locations of clouds across various active galactic nuclei and their host galaxies.

Newswise: Researchers Use Satellite Imaging to Map Groundwater Use in California’s Central Valley
Released: 30-Sep-2020 6:05 PM EDT
Researchers Use Satellite Imaging to Map Groundwater Use in California’s Central Valley
University of California San Diego

Researchers at the University of California San Diego report in a new study a way to improve groundwater monitoring by using a remote sensing technology (known as InSAR), in conjunction with climate and land cover data, to bridge gaps in the understanding of sustainable groundwater in California’s San Joaquin Valley.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 2-Oct-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 30-Sep-2020 6:05 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 2-Oct-2020 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: New Research Provides Clues on Optimizing Cell Defenses When Viruses Attack
Released: 30-Sep-2020 5:25 PM EDT
New Research Provides Clues on Optimizing Cell Defenses When Viruses Attack
University of California San Diego

Research by UC San Diego scientists is providing new clues on how cells defend themselves from attack from viruses. The new study advance’s science’s understanding of interferons— proteins that help combat viruses like SARS-CoV-2—with possible implications for new clinical treatments.

Newswise: Yale Trial Validates Immunotherapy Treatment for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
28-Sep-2020 11:30 AM EDT
Yale Trial Validates Immunotherapy Treatment for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Yale Cancer Center

The immunotherapy drug atezolizumab improves survival over standard chemotherapy for many patients with newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer, according to a new study led by Yale Cancer Center researchers.

Released: 30-Sep-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Metal-ion breakthrough leads to new biomaterials
Cornell University

Metals such as iron and calcium play a crucial role inside the human body, so it’s no surprise that bioengineers would like to integrate them into the soft, stretchy materials used to repair skin, blood vessels, lungs and other tissue.

Released: 30-Sep-2020 4:05 PM EDT
New Biomarkers for Glioma Treatment Response
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Biomarkers using mass cytometry can assess patient response to an emerging vaccine for a specific pediatric brain tumor, according to a recent multi-center study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

29-Sep-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Even in People with Parkinson’s Gene, Coffee May Be Protective
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Even for people with a gene mutation tied to Parkinson’s disease, coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of actually developing the disease, according to a new study published in the September 30, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

29-Sep-2020 9:55 AM EDT
“There’s No Place Like Home” for Rehab After Stroke
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Stroke patients who get professional rehabilitation training in their homes through live video consultations may recover their motor skills better than those who do their rehab in person with a therapist at an outpatient rehabilitation facility, according to a study published in the September 30, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Remote rehabilitation may also promote greater brain connectivity, the study said.

Newswise: 244478_web.jpg
Released: 30-Sep-2020 3:50 PM EDT
Friend-to-friend texting may be the most effective voter mobilization tactic during 2020 election
Data Science Institute at Columbia University

Friend-to-friend text messaging may be the new door-to-door canvassing leading up to the 2020 election.

Newswise: 244463_web.jpg
Released: 30-Sep-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Investigational COVID-19 vaccine well-tolerated, generates immune response in older adults
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

A Phase 1 trial of an investigational mRNA vaccine to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection has shown that the vaccine is well-tolerated and generates a strong immune response in older adults.


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