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Medicine

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Atmospheric Science (Climate; Pollution/Remediation), Toxicology, Public Health, Cardiology, Health Care

Latest Research Reveals Sitting in Traffic Jams Is Officially Bad for You

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With millions of motorists set to hit the road for the bank holiday weekend, drivers have been urged to close windows and turn off fans while in traffic jams to avoid breathing in dangerously high levels of air pollution. Latest research from the University of Surrey has shown that simple adjustment to your car's ventilation system while sitting in traffic jams can greatly affect your exposure to toxic fumes by up to 76%.

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Research to Prevent Blindness Continues Low Vision Research Initiative

The $1.4 million, two-pronged initiative involves funding partnerships with Lions Clubs International Foundation (LCIF), Reader’s Digest Partners for Sight Foundation (RDPFS), and our newest partner, Consumer Technology Association™ Foundation (CTAF).

Medicine

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rosemary rochford, University Of Colorado Cancer Center, africa cancer, Burkitt lymphoma, Cancer Viruses, Sub-Saharan Africa, Virology

In Sub-Saharan Africa, Cancer Can Be an Infectious Disease

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University of Colorado Cancer Center researcher shows that women who contract malaria while pregnant may have children with an increased risk of Burkitt's lymphoma.

Medicine

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Crohn Disease, Immune System, Celiac Disease

Case Western Reserve Researchers Receive Major NIH Renewal Grant to Build on Progress in Understanding Crohn's Disease

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has received a five-year renewal program project grant totaling $9.7 million from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institute of Health, with the goal of better understanding the origins of Crohn's disease and eventually developing a cure.

Science

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University Of The Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Massachusetts General Hospital, Zika Foundation, Atheric Pharmaceutical, Global Clinical Scholars Research Training Program , Harvard Medical School, zika, USciences

Understanding the Likely Causes of the Zika Virus Congenital Syndrome

In “Zika Fetal Neuropathogenesis: Etiology of a Viral Syndrome,” published in the most recent PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, the authors analyze Zika fetal neuropathogenesis from a comparative pathology perspective.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Aug-2016 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Bidmc, Beth Israel Deaconess, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, zika virus, brain damage infants, fetal brain development, fetal abnormalities, zika

Special Report Documents Zika Virus’ Impact on the Fetal Brain

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BOSTON – In a special report released August 23 in the journal Radiology, a team of researchers including Deborah Levine, MD, Director of Obstetric & Gynecologic ultrasound at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School (HMS), documented the brain abnormalities associated with congenital Zika in 45 confirmed and presumed cases from northeastern Brazil.

Medicine

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fracking, Migraine, Fatigue, Sinusitus

Study: Unconventional Natural Gas Wells Associated with Migraine, Fatigue, Chronic Nasal and Sinus Symptoms

New research suggests that Pennsylvania residents with the highest exposure to active natural gas wells operated by the hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) industry are nearly twice as likely to suffer from a combination of migraine headaches, chronic nasal and sinus symptoms and severe fatigue.

Medicine

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Aging, Death & Dying, Medicine And Health, Public Health, Quality of life

How Long Do You Want to Live? Your Expectations for Old Age Matter

Why do some people want to live a very long time, while others would prefer to die relatively young? In a latest study, a team of researchers including Vegard Skirbekk, PhD, at the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center, investigated how long young and middle-aged adults in the United States say they want to live in relation to a number of personal characteristics. The results showed that more than one out of six people would prefer to die younger than age 80, before reaching average life expectancy. There was no indication that the relationship between preferring a life shorter or longer than average life expectancy depended on age, gender or education.

Medicine

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New Therapy, Engineered Bacteria, Obesity, Gut Bacteria, Microbiota, Physiology, Inflammation

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Aug-2016 10:30 PM EDT

Medicine

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Cancer, Obesity, Cancer Risk, Cancer Risk Reduction, Stomach Cancer, Liver Cancer, gall bladder cancer, Pancreas Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Meningioma, Thyroid Cancer, Multiple Myeloma, Excess Weight, Overweight

Excess weight linked to 8 more cancer types

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There’s yet another reason to maintain a healthy weight as we age. An international team of researchers has identified eight additional types of cancer linked to excess weight and obesity: stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, ovary, meningioma (a type of brain tumor), thyroid cancer and the blood cancer multiple myeloma.

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Molecules Maintain Equilibrium Between Fighting Infection, Inflammatory Havoc

Special RNA molecules called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key controllers for maintaining immune health when fighting infection or preventing inflammatory disorders.

Medicine

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zika, Florida, Mosquito

Non-Travel Zika Cases in Fla. Could Approach 400 by Summer’s End

Nearly 400 non travel-related Zika infections will occur in Florida before the end of the summer, according to new projections by biostatisticians at the University of Florida and other institutions.

Medicine

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Celiac, Gluten, Gut Bacteria

Gut Bacteria Could Tip Balance in Developing Celiac Disease or Staying Healthy

About 40 per cent of the population have a genetic disposition to celiac disease, but only about one per cent develop the autoimmune condition when exposed to gluten, and this could be promoted by the type of bacteria present in the gut. Researchers at McMaster University have found that gluten, a common protein in the Western diet which is not well digested by the gut enzymes, could be metabolized by bacteria.

Medicine

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William May, zika, zika virus, Jeanne Sheffield, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Wilmer Zika Center

Johns Hopkins Opens First-Known Multidisciplinary Zika Virus Center in the World

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As the number of patients with Zika virus grows worldwide, Johns Hopkins Medicine announces the opening of the new Johns Hopkins Wilmer Zika Center dedicated primarily to caring for patients with the mosquito-borne and sexually transmitted virus. The center is composed of providers and staff from departments and divisions at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, including epidemiology, infectious diseases, maternal-fetal medicine, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, pediatrics, physiotherapy, psychiatry and social work. Medical experts from Brazil, a country greatly affected by Zika virus, are also members of the center.

Medicine

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Pharmacoeconomics, Health Economics, outcomes research, Health Outcomes, HEOR, Asia-Pacific , health technology assessment, Health Policy, Big Data, universal health coverage, ASEAN

ISPOR 7th Asia-Pacific Conference to Concentrate on Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research

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ISPOR announced confirmation of key scientific sessions for its 7th Asia-Pacific Conference scheduled to begin next week, 3-6 September 2016 in Singapore.

Medicine

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microcephaly , zika, zika virus

In Some Genetic Cases of Microcephaly, Stem Cells Fail to Launch

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In a very severe, genetic form of microcephaly, stem cells in the brain fail to divide, according to a new Columbia University Medical Center study that may provide important clues to understanding how the Zika virus affects the developing brain.

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EMBARGOED AJPH Research: Tax on sweet drinks, vaccine coverage in red and blue states, public health workers’ job satisfaction

In this month’s release, find new embargoed research about: the impact of Berkeley, California’s sugar-sweetened beverage tax; adolescent vaccine coverage differences in red and blue states; and public health practitioners’ job satisfaction and expected turnover.

Science

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Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Health, Mosquito, Disease vector, zika, Chemical Compound

SRC Fellowship Supports Student in Battle against Mosquitoes

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A chemical compound - new to science and never before identified - is being investigated by a graduate student who is working to replicate it so it can be tested as a weapon in the battle against disease-transmitting mosquitoes.

Medicine

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Nanoparticle That Mimics Salmonella Counteracts Chemotherapy Resistance, Protein’s Role in Cell Division, A Novel MRI Method, and MORE in the Cancer News Source

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