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Diabetes and Brain Tangles May Be Linked Independently of Alzheimer’s Disease

Diabetes may be linked to the buildup of tangles or tau in the brain, separate from Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study published in the September 2, 2015, online version of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 4-Sep-2015 1:00 PM EDT

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Kentucky Scientists Explain Underlying Cause of Unhealthy Brain Aging

Building on scientific evidence implicating disturbed calcium regulation in brain aging accumulated during the past 30 years, a research team in the University of Kentucky Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences has found a connection between unhealthy brain aging and a protein responsible for regulating calcium at the molecular level, FKBP1b.

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Degenerating Neurons Respond to Gene Therapy Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease

Degenerating neurons in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) measurably responded to an experimental gene therapy in which nerve growth factor (NGF) was injected into their brains, report researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in the current issue of JAMA Neurology.

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Alzheimer’s Disease Thought to Be Accelerated by an Abnormal Build-Up of Fat in the Brain

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People with Alzheimer’s disease have fat deposits in the brain. For the first time since the disease was described 109 years ago, researchers affiliated with the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have discovered accumulations of fat droplets in the brain of patients who died from the disease and have identified the nature of the fat.

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Awareness of Memory Loss May Decline 2-3 Years Before Dementia Onset

People who will develop dementia may begin to lose awareness of their memory problems two to three years before the actual onset of the disease, according to a new study published in the August 26, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that several dementia-related brain changes, or pathologies, are associated with the decline in memory awareness.

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Jammed Up Cellular Highways May Initiate Dementia and ALS

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Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered some of the first steps in how a very common gene mutation causes the brain damage associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD).

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Researchers Reveal How a Common Mutation Causes Neurodegenerative Disease

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St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and University of Massachusetts Medical School uncover the mechanism underlying the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia

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Research Identifies Cause of Postoperative Delirium in Older Patients

Newly published research from the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine explains why up to half of older adults who undergo general anesthesia develop postoperative delirium – the sudden onset of confusion, aggression or agitated behavior that could progress to dementia.

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NIH Study Shows No Benefit of Omega-3 Supplements for Cognitive Decline

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While some research suggests that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids can protect brain health, a large clinical trial by researchers at the National Institutes of Health found that omega-3 supplements did not slow cognitive decline in older persons. With 4,000 patients followed over a five-year period, the study is one of the largest and longest of its kind. It was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.