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short-term memory, Rutishauser, Mamelak, Memory Disorders

Cedars-Sinai Investigators Identify Human Brain Processes Critical to Short-Term Memory

Cedars-Sinai neuroscientists have uncovered processes involved in how the human brain creates and maintains short-term memories. This study is the first clear demonstration of precisely how human brain cells work to create and recall short-term memories. Confirmation of this process and the specific brain regions involved is a critical step in developing meaningful treatments for memory disorders that affect millions of Americans.

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A Method Based on Artificial Intelligence Allows to Diagnose Alzheimer's or Parkinson's

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Researchers from the UGR and UMA have designed a technique that aims to model high-level data abstractions to make computers learn to differentiate the brain of a healthy person from that of an ill person by extracting the affected regions.

Medicine

Science

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Schizophrenia, Autism, neurologic disorder

Kennesaw State University Scientists Conducting Cutting-Edge Research

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Two Kennesaw State University scientists have received a total of $737,364 in National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health grants for developmental biology research into autism and birth defects.

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Study: Hormone Therapy May Not Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease

The latest study on hormone therapy and Alzheimer’s disease shows no relationship between taking the drugs and whether you may develop the disease years later. Some previous studies have shown that hormone therapy may increase the risk of the disease, while others have shown that it may reduce the risk. The new study was published in the February 15, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Science

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Alzheimer's Disease, Calcium, cell energy, Mitochondria, Protein, Cell Culture, Gene, Disease Development, Pooja Jadiya, Alyssa A. Lombardi, Jonathan P. Lambert, Timothy S. Luongo, Jin Chu, Domenico Praticò, John W. Elrod, Temple University, Biophysical Society 61st Meeting, Biophysical Society

Imbalance of Calcium in a Cell's Energy Factory May Drive Alzheimer's Disease

Calcium in the mitochondria -- the energy factory of cells -- may be one of the keys to understanding and treating Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Researchers at Temple University have now identified how an imbalance of calcium ions in the mitochondria may contribute to cell death and, specifically, neurodegeneration in brain cells during Alzheimer's and dementia. The findings could eventually point to new therapies for preventing or delaying these diseases. The team will present its work during the 61st Meeting of the Biophysical Society.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Peptides, Neurodegenerative Diseases, cell toxicity, amyloid hypothesis, Antonio De Maio, Isabel Rivera, David M. Cauvi , Nelson Arispe, University of California, San Diego, Biophysical Society 61st Meeting, Biophysical Society

New Understandings of Cell Death Show Promise for Preventing Alzheimer’s

Currently, the predominant theory behind Alzheimer’s disease is the “amyloid hypothesis,” which states that abnormally increased levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides outside of brain cells produce a variety of low molecular weight Aβ aggregates that are toxic to the nervous system. These Aβ aggregates interact directly with target cells and lead to cell death. During the Biophysical Society’s meeting, being held Feb. 11-15, 2017, Antonio De Maio will present his work hunting for the specific mechanisms behind Aβ-induced toxicity to cells, or cytoxicity.

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Parkinson's Disease, Rutgers, New Jersey, Alzheimer's Disease, Neurons, Neuroscience, Brain Disease, Neurological, Roundworm, C. Elegans, Proteins, Huntington's Disease, Science, Aging

Alzheimer’s May Be Linked to Defective Brain Cells Spreading Disease

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Rutgers scientists say neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s may be linked to defective brain cells disposing toxic proteins that make neighboring cells sick. In a study published in Nature, Monica Driscoll, distinguished professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, School of Arts and Sciences, and her team, found that while healthy neurons should be able to sort out and rid brain cells of toxic proteins and damaged cell structures without causing problems, laboratory findings indicate that it does not always occur.

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Huntington's Disease, Neuro-degenerative disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease

Cellular Quality Control Process Could Be Huntington’s Disease Drug Target

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The loss of motor function and mental acuity associated with Huntington’s disease might be treatable by restoring a cellular quality control process, which Duke Health researchers have identified as a key factor in the degenerative illness.

Medicine

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Alzheimers disease, Neurosciences, Neurology, Leon Thal, Howard Feldman

Leon Thal’s Enduring Leadership in AD Research

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A remembrance of Leon Thal, MD, an early giant of Alzheimer’s disease research and treatment by Howard Feldman, MDCM, current director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's, Alzheimer's Disease, Trem 2, myeloid cells, Neuroscience, Amyloid Plaques

Alzheimer’s Disease Researchers Solve Mystery of Beguiling Protein

Leading neuroscientists have clarified the role of a controversial immune system protein in Alzheimer’s disease, showing it has opposing effects in early and late stages of the disease. Their discovery unites previous studies that left researchers conflicted and showed the protein both exacerbates and ameliorates disease symptoms. The updated model of disease progression, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, also highlights the need to align certain therapies with disease stages when treating the 1 in 9 Americans over 65 living with Alzheimer’s.

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Magnet, MRI, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Neuroimaging, Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Medical Device, Epilepsy, Autism, Construction

Photo Gallery: USC Stevens Hall Installs the First Next-Generation 7T MRI Machine in North America

Photo Gallery: Magnet the Weight of 30 Elephants Lowered Through Roof of USC Stevens Hall for Next-Gen 7T MRI Machine

Medicine

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Alzheimer's, Mayo Clinic Study on Aging, Yonas Geda, Research

Mayo Clinic Researchers Find Mental Activities May Protect Against Mild Cognitive Impairment

PHOENIX – Mayo Clinic researchers have found that engaging in mentally stimulating activities, even late in life, may protect against new-onset mild cognitive impairment, which is the intermediate stage between normal cognitive aging and dementia. The study found that cognitively normal people 70 or older who engaged in computer use, craft activities, social activities and playing games had a decreased risk of developing mild cognitive impairment. The results are published in the Jan. 30 edition of JAMA Neurology.

Medicine

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Tau Tangles, tau, Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, Tauopathy, Oligonucleotides

Drug Compound Halts Alzheimer’s-Related Damage in Mice

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In some people, the brain protein tau collects into toxic tangles that damage brain cells and contribute to diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a drug that can lower tau levels and prevent some neurological damage.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Journal Of Alzheimer's Disease, Deep Brain Stimulation

Deep Brain Stimulation Studies in Alzheimer’s Disease Pose Ethical Challenges

Promising, early studies of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease have paved a path for future clinical trials, but there are unique ethical challenges with this vulnerable population regarding decision making and post-study treatment access that need to be addressed as they ramp up, Penn Medicine researchers argue in a new review in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Medicine

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Nilotinib, Alzheimers disease, Clinical Trials, neurotherapeutics, Drug Discovery

Georgetown Clinical Trial of Nilotinib in Alzheimer’s Disease Begins

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A clinical trial to examine the effect of nilotinib on clinical outcomes and biomarkers in people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease has opened at Georgetown University Medical Center.

Medicine

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pm1, TDP-43, Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders, neuronal disease, mitochondrial dysfunction

This Man Is Revolutionizing Our Understanding of Motor Neuron Diseases and Dementias

Xinglong Wang’s team published a study in the January 2017 issue of Molecular Therapy that is seen as confirming the relevance of this neurotoxic pathway, according to an accompanying editorial by Eloise Hudry, PhD, of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Unit at Harvard Medical School. This paper also confirms TDP-43 inhibition as a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of neurologic disorders, including Alzheimer disease.

Medicine

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Northwestern University, Alzheimer

Older Adults with Arthritis Need Just 45 Minutes of Activity Per Week

Older adults who suffer from arthritis need to keep moving to be functionally independent. But in an examination of a goal that is daunting for most of this aging population, a new Northwestern Medicine study found that performing even a third of the recommended activity is beneficial.

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In Alzheimer’s, Excess Tau Protein Damages Brain’s GPS

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Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have linked excess tau protein in the brain to the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients. The findings, in mice, could lead to early diagnostic tests for Alzheimer's and point to treatments for this common and troubling symptom.

Science

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Biology, Brain, Hippocampus, Neuron, Dendrite, Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders

Study Identifies Molecular Signal for Maintaining Adult Neuron

Research in mice points to better understanding of how the structure of nerve cells in the adult hippocampus may deteriorate, which can lead to Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders.

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Delirium Could Accelerate Dementia-Related Mental Decline

When hospitalised, people can become acutely confused and disorientated. This condition, known as delirium, affects a quarter of older patients and new research by UCL and the University of Cambridge shows it may have long-lasting consequences, including accelerating the dementia process.







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