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Medicine

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Cardiac Stem Cell, MRSA, Antibiotic Resistance, Staph Bacteria, Cedars-Sinai App, Tetralogy of Fallot , congenital heart , noninvasive eye scans, Alzheimer's, Alzheimer's Disease

Cedars-Sinai Tip Sheet for Oct. 20107

October Tips Include: A noninvasive eye scan for detecting Alzheimer’s disease; a first-of-its-kind heart device for babies born with a congenital heart defect; research that could lead to a vaccine for antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” and heart research suggesting that stem cells from young hearts could rejuvenate older ones. To pursue any of these story ideas, please contact the contact listed for each.

Medicine

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Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Caregiving, Dementia care, Stress, Caregiver Distress

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Oct-2017 7:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Alzheimber's Disease, Neurology

Delayed Word Processing Could Predict Patients’ Potential to Develop Alzheimer’s Disease

A delayed neurological response to processing the written word could be an indicator that a patient with mild memory problems is at an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered.

Medicine

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alzheimer disease, Biomarker, Amyloid, Seniors, Neurology, Brain

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Oct-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Genetics, genes, TMEM106B, Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, Ftld, ALS, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Neurology, Neurons, Neurodegeneration

Penn Researchers Drill Down into Gene Behind Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

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A new study published online this week in the American Journal of Human Genetics from Penn researchers uncovers the mechanisms of the genetic mutations, or variants, associated with the TMEM106B gene.

Medicine

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diet and aging, Diet, Health, Healthy Eating, Strength, Old Age

Eating Better Throughout Adult Years Improves Physical Fitness in Old Age, Suggests Study

People who have a healthier diet throughout their adult lives are more likely to be stronger and fitter in older age than those who don’t, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

Science

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Biology, Cell Biology, Aging, Neurodegenative Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Huntington's Disease, Dementia

Worms Learn to Smell Danger

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University of Iowa researchers report that a roundworm can learn to put on alert a defense system important for protecting cells from damage. The finding could lead to a new approach for treating neurodegenerative diseases in humans caused by damaged cells.

Medicine

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anti-aging therapies, Aging, Longevity, Fountain Of Youth, Centenarians, longer life, longer lifespans

Einstein Researchers Share $9 Million Grant to Find Anti-Aging Therapies

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Scientists now believe that the Fountain of Youth flows from our genes, or at least from the genes of people who live healthy lives to age 100 or later. To discover what’s special about the genes of centenarians—and apply that knowledge to extend the healthy lives of the rest of us—the NIH has awarded researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) a five-year, $9 million grant.

Medicine

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Aging, conserved pathway, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, University Hospitals, age-associated disorders, kruppel-like tran, klf, Proteins, Worms, mice, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Dementia

Worms Reveal Secrets of Aging

Investigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Health System have identified a new molecular pathway that controls lifespan and healthspan in worms and mammals. In a Nature Communications study published today, researchers showed that worms with excess levels of certain proteins lived longer and healthier than normal worms. In addition, mice with excess levels of these proteins demonstrated a delay in blood vessel dysfunction associated with aging. The study has major implications for our understanding of aging and age-associated disorders.

Science

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Alzheimer’s, Aging, Dementia, Genetic Engineering, Research, Grants

Effort to Create Mouse That More Closely Mirrors Human Alzheimer’s Wins Federal Grant

A proposal to humanize several mouse genes for research into Alzheimer’s disease has spurred the National Institute on Aging to award $11.35 million to the University of California, Irvine.







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