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Award Winning Photographer, Robert Whitman, Partners with Lewy Body Dementia Association

Award winning photographer, Robert Whitman, captures lives of those affected with Lewy Body Dementia in a poignant collection of original photography.

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UNT Health Science Center Researcher Establishes Guidelines for Clinical Trials of Alzheimer's Blood Test

Researchers have moved a step closer to making a simple blood test to detect early Alzheimer's disease available for screening older adults.

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Worry, Jealousy, Moodiness Linked to Higher Risk of Alzheimer’s in Women

Women who are anxious, jealous, or moody and distressed in middle age may be at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease later in life, according to a nearly 40-year-long study published in the October 1, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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National Dementia Association Launches Awareness Month

Lewy Body Dementia Association launches month of Awareness. October is LBD Awareness Month, nationwide series of events will take place.

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Memory Loss Associated with Alzheimer’s Reversed for First Time

In the first, small study of a novel, personalized and comprehensive program to reverse memory loss, nine of 10 participants, including the ones above, displayed subjective or objective improvement in their memories beginning within 3-to-6 months after the program’s start.

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Memory Slips May Signal Increased Risk of Dementia Years Later

New research suggests that people without dementia who begin reporting memory issues may be more likely to develop dementia later, even if they have no clinical signs of the disease. The study is published in the September 24, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Think You Have Alzheimer's? You Just Might Be Right, Study Says

New research by scientists at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging suggests that people who notice their memory is slipping may be on to something.

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Dying Brain Cells Cue New Brain Cells to Grow in Songbird

Using a songbird as a model, scientists have described a brain pathway that replaces cells that have been lost naturally and not because of injury. If scientists can further tap into the process, it might lead to ways to encourage replacement of cells in human brains that have lost neurons naturally because of aging or Alzheimer's disease.

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National Health Org Unveils “A Day in the Life of Lewy Body Dementia”

Have you ever wondered what life would be like if you suffered from dementia other than Alzheimer’s disease? Wonder no more. The Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA), today, unveils what might be a typical day in the life for caregivers and their loved ones who suffer with Lewy body dementia (LBD), a complex, challenging, and surprisingly common brain disease. LBD families have unique challenges that differ from Alzheimer’s, and awareness is needed by healthcare professionals and the general public to better support them. Judy picks out Bob’s clothes every morning and helped him dress. After a slow, unsteady walk down the stairs, he takes the medicine Judy doles out and later “helps” her dry the breakfast dishes. They go out together some days to run errands, but everything takes longer now because of Bob’s confusion, muscle stiffness, and slow, shuffling walk. Sometimes he can zip his coat up on the first try, but there are days he doesn’t understand

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Mayo Researchers Reveal Pathway that Contributes to Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers at Jacksonville’s campus of Mayo Clinic have discovered a defect in a key cell-signaling pathway they say contributes to both overproduction of toxic protein in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients as well as loss of communication between neurons — both significant contributors to this type of dementia.

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