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Problems with Bariatric Surgery, Burning Bone Fat, Food Insecurity, and More in the Obesity News Source

Click here to go directly to Newswise's Obesity News Source

Medicine

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Obesity, Weight Loss, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Family Based Therapy, Parent Based Therapy, Childhood Obesity

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-May-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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SIDS, Infant Death, air mattresses, Consumer Safety, bedbugs

Researchers Find Air Mattresses Present a Growing Safety Risk to Infants, Recommend Changes

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the University of Georgia have found that as air mattresses become increasingly popular, the inflatable beds place infants at great risk for sleep-related death. They call for a greater recognition of air mattress use in both policy statements and data collection about infant deaths.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Drowning, Drowning Death, drowning prevention , Electric Shock, Electricity, Water Safety, Pool Safety, Swimming, Swimming Safety

Don’t Be Shocked! Keep Your Family Safe Around Pools and Lakes This Summer

A UAB engineer provides information about the risks and prevention methods associated with electric shock drowning in fresh bodies of water.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Fathers' Brains Respond Differently to Daughters Than Sons

Fathers with toddler daughters are more attentive and responsive to those daughters’ needs than fathers with toddler sons are to the needs of those sons, according to brain scans and recordings of the parents’ daily interactions with their kids.

Medicine

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ADHD, Chacko, NYU, NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, NYU Steinhardt, Parenting, Parent Training

Parent Training on ADHD Using Volunteers Can Help Meet Growing Treatment Needs

Using volunteers to train parents concerned about attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in their children can improve capacity to meet increasing ADHD treatment needs, finds a new study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

Medicine

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Health & Medicine, Childbirth, pain, Depression

Mindfulness-Focused Childbirth Education Leads to Less Depression, Better Birth Experiences

A study this month from researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) shows mindfulness training that addresses fear and pain during childbirth can improve women’s childbirth experiences and reduce their depression symptoms during pregnancy and the early postpartum period.

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Can Parents’ Tech Obsessions Contribute to A Child’s Bad Behavior?

Study looks at whether behaviors like whining and tantrums could be related to parents spending too much time on their phones or tablets.

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American College of Radiology (ACR), Radiologist’s Toolkit for Patient- and Family-Centered Care

Improve Patient-Engagement Skills With Free ACR Online Resource

The new American College of Radiology (ACR) Radiologist’s Toolkit for Patient- and Family-Centered Care offers online practice-specific resources to help radiologists enhance patient engagement skills and offer more patient-centered care.

Medicine

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Sleep Apnea, OSA, African American, Children, children and sleep, Pediatrics, Child Health, sleep apnea treatment, Sleep

Severe Pediatric Sleep Apnea in Washington, DC Most Common in Inner City African-American Children From Low Income Families; Diagnosis Often Delayed

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Pediatric severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the Washington, DC metropolitan area is most common among inner city African-American children from low income families, according to a new study presented at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference. The researchers also found that these children were most likely to have a delayed diagnosis.







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