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Special Issue of American Journal of Public Health Addresses Teen Pregnancy Prevention

A new supplement of AJPH explores the impacts of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Adolescent Health’s Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program.

Medicine

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childhood health, maternal experiences, environmental issues childhood health, Dr. Pathik Wadhwa

UCI to Participate in Major Federal Effort to Improve Childhood Health

The University of California, Irvine’s Development, Health & Disease Research Program has been selected to take part in a $157 million federal initiative to understand how environmental influences from conception through early childhood can affect the health of youngsters and adolescents.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Children, time spent with children, Parents

Today’s Parents Spend More Time with Their Kids Than Moms and Dads Did 50 Years Ago

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Guilt-ridden busy moms and dads take heart: Mothers – and fathers – across most Western countries are spending more time with their children than parents did in the mid-’60s, according to a University of California, Irvine study. And time spent with kids is highest among better-educated parents – a finding that somewhat surprised study co-author Judith Treas, UCI Chancellor’s Professor of sociology.

Medicine

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Food Insecurity, child hunger, Child Welfare, Hunger, poverty and health, Poverty, Immigrant, Immigration enforcement, Immigration enforcement program, Immigration Expert, Immigration and Health , Health Outcomes, health outcomes research, Immigration Policy, Deportation

Deportation Risk Increases Food Insecurity

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Researchers from the University of Missouri have found that local immigration enforcement policies that seek to apprehend and deport adults, can increase food insecurity risks for Mexican non-citizen households with children. Stephanie Potochnick, assistant professor in the Truman School of Public Affairs, says that any immigration policy that seeks to deport adults must have support systems, such as access to food stamps, in place to help improve outcomes for the children left behind.

Medicine

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Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding Benefits, Maternal And Child Health, Maternal And Fetal Health, Maternal Health

UNC-Chapel Hill OB-GYN Dr. Alison Stuebe Co-Authors New Study That Shows Breastfeeding Saves Mothers’ Lives, Too

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New research shows that breastfeeding is not only good for children, but also for their mothers, providing more health benefits and preventing more maternal diseases than previously known.

Medicine

Science

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Energy Drinks, Alcohol, Drunk Driving, caffein, energy drinks mixed with alcohol, Students, Parents, Clinicians, college administrators

Energy Drink Use, with or Without Alcohol, Contributes to Drunk Driving

Highly caffeinated energy drinks (EDs) have been of concern to the public-health community for almost a decade. Many young people consume EDs with alcohol to decrease alcohol’s sedative effects and stay awake longer, enabling them to drink more alcohol. Adding to the growing body of research linking ED consumption with risk-taking and alcohol-related problems, this study examined its relationship with drunk driving. Importantly, the researchers differentiated between the different ways in which EDs are consumed: exclusively with alcohol, exclusively without alcohol, or both with and without alcohol depending on the occasion.

Medicine

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health disparaties, Native American Health, Cheyenne River Indian Reservation , Missouri Breaks Research Industries, Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health, National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities , National Institutes Of Health (NIH), South Dakota State University

Accomplishing Socioeconomic Goals May Build Confidence, Improve Health of Native American Families

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Health disparities research typically controls for socioeconomic status in analyses, but the We RISE study looks at changing those socioeconomic variables. The six-month intervention targets young Native American mothers willing to work toward an income-related or education goal using community resources and support. Once the women have achieved one goal, the hope is that they gain the skills and confidence to ask themselves, “What other potential do I have that I have not yet uncovered?”

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Infectious Diseases, Infectious Disease, Diarrhea, diarrhea causes, Developing World, Eric Houpt, University Of Virginia, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Shigella, E. Coli, Bacteria, Cryptosporidium, Parasite, Parasites, Rotavirus, Adenovirus, Campylobacter, Campylobacter Jejuni, Bangladesh, India, Africa, Pakistan, Mozambique, Kenya, Mali, The Gambia, G

Surprising Findings on Deadly Diarrhea Suggest Ways to Save Children's Lives

New research offers unprecedented insights into the causes of childhood diarrhea, the second-leading cause of death of children worldwide, and suggests that the role of pathogens has been vastly underestimated.

Medicine

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Affordable Care Act , Affordable Care Act (ACA), Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding Call to Action, Working Mothers, Employer Compliance, Rural America, Rural Communities, Rural Health Care

Rural Employers Failing to Meet Needs of Working Breastfeeding Mothers

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The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires employers of more than 50 employees to provide sufficient space and time for mothers to breastfeed during the first year of their babies’ lives. Researchers from the University of Missouri conducted an analysis of ACA’s requirement to determine if any barriers exist for women living in rural areas; they found a lack of compliance with the law, inadequate breastfeeding information for mothers and lack of support from co-workers and supervisors.

Medicine

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teen pregnancies, Teen Pregnancy, uthealth school of public health, UTHealth , we can do more, Prevention

UTHealth Receives More Than $3 Million to Expand Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program

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Houston Endowment has awarded a three-year, $3 million grant to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health to expand a successful teen pregnancy prevention program that began in the Sunnyside community of Houston.

Medicine

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Hearing Loss, Pregnancy, Premature Birth, Low Birth Weight, Birth Outcomes, maternal hearing loss, American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Women with Hearing Loss More Likely to Have Preterm or Low Birth Weight Babies

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Hearing loss is a marginalizing and disabling condition, resulting in various adverse social and health outcomes. Babies born to women with hearing loss were significantly more likely to be premature and have low birth weight, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Understanding and addressing the causes are critical to improving pregnancy outcomes among women with hearing loss, say investigators.

Medicine

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Eczema, Vitamin B, Maternal Health

Vitamin B Levels During Pregnancy Linked to Eczema Risk in Child

Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown.

Medicine

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Venous Thromboembolism, Postpartum, DVT, Pregnancy, Pulmonary Embolism, Chest, Cesarean Section

Cesarean Section Carries Increased Risk for Postpartum Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)

Roughly one-third of all births in Europe and North America now occur via cesarean section (CS). Following any birth, women are at an increased risk for a venous thromboembolism (VTE), but it’s believed that CS leaves women more vulnerable to VTE, blood clots, than vaginal delivery (VD). A new study published in CHEST determined that there is a link between CS and an increased absolute risk of VTE, including pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Investigators found that CS was associated with a higher rate of overall VTE risk, with emergency CS associated with the greatest risk.

Medicine

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environmental exposures, Stress, Neurodevelopment, Neonatology, Microbiome, socio-economic status, Health Disparities, stress during pregnancy, Prenatal Health, Cognitive Deficits

UChicago Among Institutions Nationwide to Get $157 Million in NIH Awards

University of Chicago researchers will receive about $5 million in the first two years of a seven-year initiative called Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO), which will investigate how exposure to a range of environmental factors in early development influences the health of children.

Life

Education

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How to Talk with Kids About Traumatic Events

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In the wake of the recent terror events, a Rutgers expert discusses how to discuss violence-related fears with young children and warning signs to anticipate.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Mother and child, Mother, Night Shift, Social Bonding, Interpersonal Relationships, African-Americans, Safety Net, Marriage, Children

Working Mothers Most in Need of Social Support Are Less Likely to Receive It

A new study links nonstandard work schedules to weaker private safety nets, particularly for African-Americans, the less educated and those who don't work 9-to-5. However, there also is evidence that switching from a standard to a nonstandard schedule increases the safety net. These mixed results suggest that the working mothers most in need social support are the least likely to actually have access to it.

Medicine

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Duke Clinical Research Institute, Clinical Trials, NIH, childhood health

Duke Clinical Research Institute to Coordinate National Study of Childhood Health

The Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) has been named the coordinating center as part of a $157-million federal initiative involved in studying how environmental factors affect childhood health.

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Feeding Babies Egg and Peanut May Prevent Food Allergy

Feeding babies egg and peanut may reduce their risk of developing an allergy to the foods, finds a new study.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Feelings, Emotions, Children, Parents, negative feelings, Hiding

Aaron Cooper, PhD, Available to Discuss Hiding Negative Feelings From Children

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Medicine

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Exercise, Parent-child relationship, Socio Economic Status, Midlife, Disease, family abuse, Sleep, Nutrition, Aging

Good Relationships with Parents May Benefit Children’s Health Decades Later

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Growing up in a well-off home can benefit a child’s physical health even decades later — but a lack of parent-child warmth, or the presence of abuse, may eliminate the health advantage of a privileged background, according to a Baylor University study.







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