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Moms of Food-Allergic Kids Need Dietician’s Support

According to a new study published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, providing parents with detailed, individual advice from a dietician is a key component of effective food allergy care.

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Make 2015 a Year of Learning. Ten Simple Tips for Parents of Young Children From the University of Delaware

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Less Than Half of Parents Think Their 18-Year-Olds Can Make a Doctors Appointment

Most parents agree their children should be ready to move out of the pediatrician’s office into adult-focused care by age 18 – but just 30 percent actually make that transition by that age, according to the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health.

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Are You Genetically Predisposed to Antisocial Behaviour?

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Both positive and negative experiences influence how genetic variants affect the brain and thereby behaviour, according to a new study. “Evidence is accumulating to show that the effects of variants of many genes that are common in the population depend on environmental factors. Further, these genetic variants affect each other,” explained Sheilagh Hodgins of the University of Montreal and its affiliated Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal.

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Forget Shouting: Guide to Productive Family Arguments Over Holidays

While many people try to steer clear of arguments with family members during holiday celebrations, two philosophy professors offer a better solution. Scott Aikin and Robert Talisse co-wrote "Why We Argue (and How We Should)."

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Nearly Half of U.S. Kids Exposed to Traumatic Social or Family Experiences During Childhood

Nearly half of all children in the United States are exposed to at least one social or family experience that can lead to traumatic stress and impact their healthy development – be it having their parents divorce, a parent die or living with someone who abuses alcohol or drugs – increasing the risk of negative long-term health consequences or of falling behind in school, suggests new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Religion or Spirituality Has Positive Impact on Romantic/Marital Relationships, Child Development, Research Shows

Adolescents who attend religious services with one or both of their parents are more likely to feel greater well-being while romantic partners who pray for their “significant others” experience greater relationship commitment, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Strong Neighborhoods, Parenting Can Bridge ‘Achievement Gap’

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A University of Illinois at Chicago study of academic achievement suggests that urban youth may benefit from strong families and safe neighborhoods in addition to child-centered interventions.

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Study Finds Girls, Boys Affected Differently by Witnessing Parental Violence

Witnessing violence by parents or a parent’s intimate partner can trigger for some children a chain of negative behaviors that follows them from preschool to kindergarten and beyond, according to researchers at Case Western Reserve University.

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Forget About the Car Keys, Do You Know When to Take Away Your Parent's Checkbook?

Financial management skills can decline with age, which can lead to catastrophic money woes for seniors.Declining financial aptitude can also be a sign of impending memory loss. UAB researchers present some warning signs.

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