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Parents, Listen Next Time Your Baby Babbles

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Parents who try to understand their baby's babbling let their infants know they can communicate, which leads to children forming complex sounds and using language more quickly. That’s according to a new study by the University of Iowa and Indiana University.

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Life

Education

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How Parents Can Help Their Children Succeed and Stay in School

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Students are back in school and now is the time for parents to develop routines to help their children succeed academically. An Iowa State University professor says parental involvement, more than income or social status, is a predictor of student achievement.

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Expectant Parents’ Play with Doll Predicts Later Parenting Behavior

Having expectant parents role-play interacting with an infant using a doll can help predict which couples may be headed for co-parenting conflicts when their baby arrives.

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Ready to Help Your Family Get Healthy? Take the EmpowerMEnt Challenge!

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month and to help raise awareness with families across the country, the American Heart Association (AHA) has an easy and fun way to help you with the No. 1 health concern among parents – childhood obesity.

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Daughters Provide as Much Elderly Parent Care as They Can, Sons Do as Little as Possible

Parents are better off having daughters if they want to be cared for in their old age suggests a new study, which finds that women appear to provide as much elderly parent care as they can, while men contribute as little as possible.

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Men Viewed More Favorably Than Women When Seeking Work-Life Balance

While some suggest that flexible work arrangements have the potential to reduce workplace inequality, a new study finds these arrangements may exacerbate discrimination based on parental status and gender.

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‘Super-Parent’ Cultural Pressures Can Spur Mental Health Conditions in New Moms and Dads

Mental health experts in the past three decades have emphasized the dangers of post-partum depression for mothers, but a University of Kansas researcher says expanding awareness of several other perinatal mental health conditions is important for all new parents, including fathers.

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Parental Incarceration Can Be Worse for a Child Than Divorce or Death of a Parent

With more than 2 million people behind bars, the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world. This mass incarceration has serious implications for not only the inmates, but their children, finds a new University of California-Irvine study. The study found significant health problems, including behavioral issues, in children of incarcerated parents and also that, for some types of health outcomes, parental incarceration can be more detrimental to a child’s well-being than divorce or the death of a parent.

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Disconnect Between Parenting and Certain Jobs a Source of Stress, Study Finds

Some working parents are carrying more psychological baggage than others — and the reason has nothing to do with demands on their time and energy. The cause is their occupation.

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Parenting Beyond Pink and Blue

From the first day of their lives, most boys and girls are treated differently. Those differences begin with a pink versus blue nursery, clothes with laces rather than ribbons, sports equipment or dance lessons, and on and on right through to “manly” careers versus “feminine” jobs.

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