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Human Development Could be Harmed by Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Released During Natural Gas Extraction

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More than 15 million Americans live within one mile of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) operations that combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” to release natural gas from underground rock. Scientific studies still are inconclusive on the potential long-term effects on human development. Now, Susan C. Nagel and Christopher D. Kassotis, researchers with the University of Missouri, and national colleagues have conducted a review of research on health effects associated with UOG operations and concluded these activities have potential for environmental release of a complex mixture of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that could potentially harm human development and reproduction.

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Hypoallergenic Parks: Coming Soon?

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Grenada, Spain's climate and layout is like that of many cities in the Mediterranean area, which has the highest occurrence of pollen allergies in the world. The researchers hope their efforts will lead to fantastic urban green spaces that don’t cause allergic reactions for 30% of the city’s population.

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Low-Level Arsenic Exposure Before Birth Associated with Early Puberty and Obesity in Female Mice

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Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. The finding is significant because the exposure level of 10 parts per billion used in the study is the current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standard, or maximum allowable amount, for arsenic in drinking water. The study, which appeared online August 21 in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, serves as a good starting point for examining whether low-dose arsenic exposure could have similar health outcomes in humans.

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Environmental Health Expert, Innovator Stuart Shalat Joins Georgia State Public Health Faculty

Dr. Stuart Shalat, an expert on pollution and its effect on children’s health, has joined the School of Public Health at Georgia State University as a professor and director of the Division of Environmental Health.

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Cashiers May Have Higher Risk for BPA Exposure Than General Population

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The use of Bisphenol A (BPA) in plastic has been on the decline amid growing concerns that the compound’s estrogen-mimicking properties may cause dangerous hormonal disruptions. Despite the reduction, BPA remains a ubiquitous substance, found in thousands of products. Cashiers who frequently handle thermal printed receipts may be exposed to higher levels of BPA than the general population. For the first time, researchers are studying this workforce segment to measure how their exposure may differ from that of the general population.

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Trace Heavy Metals in Plastics Pose No Immediate Food Safety Threat but May Lead to Long-Term Environmental Problems

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The trace amounts of toxic substances used to make plastics don’t contaminate the food or beverage products they contain at a significant level and pose no immediate threat to consumers, according to recent Iowa State University research. But the plastics may create environmental problems years after they’ve been used.

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Scientists Warn of Pharmaceutical Peril for Aquatic Organisms in Urban Rivers

Post-doctoral Researcher Yun-Ya Yang, working with Associate Professor Gurpal Toor, studied areas along rural and urban parts of the Alafia River, in Hillsborough County, near Tampa. They found 17 pharmaceuticals. But they say these types of chemicals are not confined to the Alafia River or urban-area rivers in Florida.

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Change in Process of Disinfecting Spinach, Salad Greens Could Reduce Illness Outbreaks

Cross contamination in commercial processing facilities that prepare spinach and other leafy greens for the market can make people sick. But researchers are reporting a new, easy-to-implement method that could eliminate or reduce such incidences. The scientists will present their work at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

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UGA Collaboration Discovers Toxic Chemical in Birds Outside of Superfund Site

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Researchers at the University of Georgia’s Savannah River Ecology Laboratory have found that a contaminated mixture called Aroclor 1268 has spread beyond a former chemical plant, now a Superfund site, near Brunswick.

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NAU Researcher Looks Through the Noise to Discover Potential Risks From Jet Fuel

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Jet fuel, when combined with sustained noise, may cause brain-related injury and lead to multiple conditions.