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Second Hand Smoke: Nations That Produce Fewer Greenhouse Gases Most Vulnerable to Climate Change, Study Says

A new study by University of Queensland and WCS shows a dramatic global mismatch between nations producing the most greenhouse gases and the ones most vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

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UT Water Resource Expert Available to Discuss Flint Crisis, Solutions

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NUS Researchers Turn Paper Waste Into Ultralight Super Material That Improves Oil Spill Cleaning and Heat Insulation

A research team led by Assistant Professor Duong Hai Minh from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Faculty of Engineering, has achieved a world’s first by successfully converting paper waste into green cellulose aerogels that are non-toxic, ultralight, flexible, extremely strong and water repellent. This novel material is ideal for applications such as oil spill cleaning, heat insulation as well as packaging, and it can potentially be used as coating materials for drug delivery and as smart materials for various biomedical applications.

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Chemical in “BPA-Free” Plastic Accelerates Embryonic Development, Disrupts Reproductive System in Animals

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A new UCLA study demonstrates that BPS, a common replacement for BPA, speeds up embryonic development and disrupts the reproductive system. The research is the first to examine the effects of BPA and BPS on key brain cells and genes that control organs involved in reproduction.

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Bedbugs Have Built Resistance to Widely Used Chemical Treatments, Study Finds

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Some of the most widely used commercial chemicals to kill bedbugs are not effective because the pesky insects have built up a tolerance to them, according to a team of researchers from Virginia Tech and New Mexico State University.

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What's the Science Behind the Flint Water Crisis?

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Flint Is Latest Example of Environmental Injustice and Pollution Inequality in the U.S.

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Eating Soy May Protect Women from Health Risks of BPA

Consuming soy regularly may protect women who are undergoing infertility treatments from poor success rates linked to bisphenol A exposure, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Flint’s Water Crisis ‘Infuriating’ Given Knowledge About Lead Poisoning

Harvard Chan School’s Philippe Grandjean, an expert in how environmental pollution impairs brain development, says that Flint, Michigan’s water crisis could have been prevented, given the United States’ long experience with lead contamination—and how to prevent it.

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Prenatal Exposure to Flame Retardants Linked to Poorer Behavioral Function in Children

New research from the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine suggests that prenatal exposure to flame retardants and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) commonly found in the environment may have a lasting effect on a child’s cognitive and behavioral development, known as executive function.

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Exposure to High Levels of Small Particle Air Pollution Associated with Higher Risk of Preterm Birth

Exposure to high levels of small particle air pollution is associated with an increased risk of preterm birth – before 37 weeks of pregnancy, according to a new study published online in the journal Environmental Health.

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Long-Term Exposure to Ozone May Increase Lung and Cardiovascular Deaths

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Adults with long-term exposure to ozone (O3) face an increased risk of dying from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, according to the study “Long-Term Ozone Exposure and Mortality in a Large Prospective Study” published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Are People Suffering as a Result of Ultrasound in the Air?

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New research from the University of Southampton indicates that the public are being exposed, without their knowledge, to airborne ultrasound.

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UCI Flint, Mich., Expert Available to Speak About Water Crisis. #UCIrvine

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New Experiments Determine Effective Treatments for Box Jelly Stings

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Researchers at the University of Hawai'i - Mānoa (UHM) developed an array of highly innovative experiments to allow scientists to safely test first-aid measures used for box jellyfish stings - from folk tales, like urine, to state-of-the-art technologies developed for the military.

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Fires Burning in Africa & Asia Cause High Ozone in Tropical Pacific

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UMD-led study indicates “biomass burning” may play larger role in climate change than previously realized.

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Poison Warmed Over

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University of Utah lab experiments found that when temperatures get warmer, woodrats suffer a reduced ability to live on their normal diet of toxic creosote – suggesting that global warming may hurt plant-eating animals.

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Public Lands, Toxic Chemicals, Lake Superior Issues

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Spread of Algal Toxin Through Marine Food Web Broke Records in 2015

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While Dungeness crab captured headlines, record levels of the neurotoxin domoic acid were found in a range of species, and the toxin showed up in new places.

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Long-Term Ozone Exposure Increases Acute Respiratory Disease Syndrome Risk in Critically Ill Patients

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Critically ill patients who are exposed to higher daily levels of ozone are more likely to develop acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS), according to a new study published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. ARDS is a life-threatening inflammatory lung illness in which patients fail to obtain enough oxygen to the lungs. While previous research has shown a clear association between cigarette smoke and ARDS, the study “Long-Term Ozone Exposure Increases the Risk of Developing the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome” by Lorraine Ware, MD, of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and colleagues is the first to demonstrate a risk related to ozone.