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HHS Releases 13th Report on Carcinogens

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Four substances have been added in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 13th Report on Carcinogens, a science-based document that identifies chemical, biological, and physical agents that are considered cancer hazards for people living in the United States. The new report includes 243 listings.

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Dog Waste Contaminates Our Waterways

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Americans love their dogs, but they don't always love to pick up after them. And that's a problem. Dog feces left on the ground wash into waterways, sometimes carrying bacteria — including antibiotic-resistant strains — that can make people sick. Now scientists have developed a new genetic test to figure out how much dogs are contributing to this health concern, according to a report in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

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Asthma Symptoms Kicking Up? Check Your Exposure to Air Pollution

An article in the October issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, explores the case of a woman who suffers from asthma, and, along with her doctor, realizes that by changing her bike route to and from work every day, she can cut down on the pollution to which she’s exposed, thereby improving her asthma symptoms.

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Disease Without Borders

In a paper published this week online in Global Society, researchers with University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Urban Studies and Planning Program, also at UC San Diego, present a bioregional guide that merges place-based (territorial) city planning and ecosystem management along the United States-Mexico border as way to improve human and environmental health.

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Microplastic Pollution Discovered in St. Lawrence River Sediments

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A team of researchers from McGill University and the Quebec government have discovered microplastics (in the form of polyethylene ‘microbeads,’ less than 2 mm in diameter) widely distributed across the bottom of the St. Lawrence River, the first time such pollutants have been found in freshwater sediments.

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Actions on Climate Change Bring Better Health, Study Says

The number of extremely hot days in Eastern and Midwestern U.S. cities is projected to triple by mid-century, according to a new study. In presenting their synthesis, the study authors seek to encourage efforts that benefit both the health of the planet and the health of people.

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Don’t Drink the (Warm) Water, Study Says

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There's an old saying: "Don't drink the water." But a UF/IFAS scientist warns Americans not to drink water from plastic bottles if it's been sitting in a warm environment for a long time. Lena Ma led a research team in China that examined 16 bottled water brands at 158 degrees for four weeks.

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Gas Leaks From Faulty Wells Linked to Contamination in Some Groundwater

A study has pinpointed the likely source of most natural gas contamination in drinking-water wells associated with hydraulic fracturing, and it’s not the source many people may have feared.

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Acute Photo-Induced Toxicity and Toxicokinetics of Single Compounds and Mixtures of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Zebrafish

In a recent publication, toxicity in zebrafish larvae was investigated from exposure to mixtures and multiple stressors. Mixtures included exposure to all combinations of four PAHs, with the additional stressor of ultraviolet light leading to phototoxic effects. The results indicated all PAHs were phototoxic and the mixtures mechanism of toxicity was additive. Data were compiled and a predictive toxicity model was developed.

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Smoke This! Public Health Impacts of E-Cigarettes

Despite the fact that traditional cigarette consumption has been on the decline in the United States since the mid-1970s, the use of electronic cigarettes, or “e-cigarettes,” among adults and teenagers is becoming more and more prevalent. These devices are regularly marketed as a safe alternative to smoking conventional cigarettes, and are promoted as smoking cessation aids, similar to nicotine patches and nicotine gum. However, e-cigarettes are becoming increasingly scrutinized by health experts and regulatory agencies and there are an increasing number of questions surrounding these safety claims, particularly in regard to exposure among teenagers and young children. This article explains the known and anticipated risks of e-cigarette use, as well as the potential for accidental ingestion of liquid nicotine by small children.

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