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thomas and friends, Autism, Texas Tech

Expert: New Engine Puts Thomas and Friends on Track with Autism Community

Theo Courtesy: Thomas & Friends Thomas & Friends is set to introduce a new line of "experimental engines," including Theo, who is described as genuinely kind and caring, but with an awkward habit of blunt speaking. He also has a geared drive system that often does not run smoothly, making sudden jolts when his cogs jam.

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Why Leaving a Romantic Relationship is So Hard, Heavy Drinkers and Partner Violence, College Men Struggle to Understand Concent, and More in the Sex and Relationships News Source

The latest research and features on sex in the Sex and Relationships News Source

Medicine

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Prostate Cancer

Coaching the Pros

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Data from the Corporal Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Philadelphia showed that doctors there were ordering bone scans at three times the national rate for a certain group of prostate cancer patients. It called for a coaching visit to the pitcher's mound.

Science

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DNA, Monoclonal Antibody, Prostate Cancer

Wistar Scientists Develop Novel Immunotherapy Technology for Prostate Cancer

A study led by Wistar scientists describes a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer based on the use of synthetic DNA to directly encode protective antibodies against a cancer specific protein.

Medicine

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Chemotherapy resistance, Center for Biomedical Discovery

Discovery of New Prostate Cancer Biomarkers Could Improve Precision Therapy

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic researchers have identified a new cause of treatment resistance in prostate cancer. Their discovery also suggests ways to improve prostate cancer therapy. The findings appear in Nature Medicine.

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Children's Mental Health, Large-Scale Program, Prevention, School-based interventions, Harvard Review of Psychiatry

Mental Health Programs in Schools – Growing Body of Evidence Supports Effectiveness

School-based mental health programs can reach large numbers of children, with increasing evidence of effectiveness in improving mental health and related outcomes, according to a research review in the September/October issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

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Men, Not Women, May Be Having Fewer Strokes

The overall rate of stroke in the United States has been declining in recent years and while that has been good news, a new study suggests it may be primarily good news for men. The research, published in the August 9, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, found that while the stroke rate for men declined during the study period, for women it remained the same.

Medicine

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L1 retrotransposons, sperm cells, Birth Defects, Genetic Mutations, piRNA pathway, Dna Methylation, Histone Modification

Understanding Mutations in Sperm Cells Can Help Prevent Birth Defects

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Researchers are investigating mobile DNA segments, known as L1 insertions, in sperm cells with the long-term goal of preventing birth defects by treating at-risk individuals, prior to conceiving a child.

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National Comprehensive Cancer Network, NCCN, JNCCN - Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Cancer, Oncology, Cancer Research, oncology research, Ut Southwestern, anal cancer

Black Men Have Lowest Survival Rates Among Patients with Anal Cancer

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As published in JNCCN – Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center found significant racial and gender-based disparities in outcomes among patients with locoregional anal cancer.

Medicine

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Vasan Yegnasubramanian, Steven An, Prostate Cancer, Prostate, AIM1

Prostate Cancer Cells Become ‘Shapeshifters’ to Spread to Distant Organs

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Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists report they have discovered a biochemical process that gives prostate cancer cells the almost unnatural ability to change their shape, squeeze into other organs and take root in other parts of the body. The scientists say their cell culture and mouse studies of the process, which involves a cancer-related protein called AIM1, suggest potential ways to intercept or reverse the ability of cancers to metastasize, or spread.







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