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Article ID: 695242

Researchers Create Advanced Brain Organoid to Model Strokes, Screen Drugs

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have developed a 3-D brain organoid that could have potential applications in drug discovery and disease modeling.

Released:
29-May-2018 3:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 668302

Prevention by Social Connections, Refuting Claims on HIV Persistence, Efficient Oral Medicines, and More in the AIDS and HIV News Source

Newswise

The latest research, features, and experts on HIV and AIDS.

Released:
25-May-2018 3:35 PM EDT
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Article ID: 649790

Inside Cancer Cells, Tumor Growth in Kidney Cancer, Genetic Screening Guidelines, and More in the Cancer News Source

Newswise

Click here to go directly to the Cancer News Source

Released:
11-May-2018 3:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694389

Multiple Myeloma: A Bold Study to Make Allografting Safer and More Efficient

Universite de Montreal

Dr. Jean Roy hopes to someday cure patients with multiple myeloma, one of the most common (and still incurable) bone marrow cancers, thanks to a new molecule called UM171 discovered by scientists at Université de Montréal.

Released:
11-May-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 673608

Better Care for Macular Degeneration, AI for Detecting Eye Disease, Ultra-Rare Inherited Retinal Diseases, and More in the Vision News Source

Newswise

The latest research and feature news on vision in the Vision News Source

Released:
16-Mar-2018 4:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 690892

Researchers Rescue Embryos From Brain Defects by Re-Engineering Cellular Voltage Patterns

Tufts University

Tufts biologists have demonstrated for the first time that electrical patterns in developing embryos can be predicted, mapped and manipulated to prevent defects caused by harmful substances such as nicotine. The study suggests that targeting bioelectric states may be a new treatment modality for regenerative repair in brain development and disease.

Released:
9-Mar-2018 3:00 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    28-Feb-2018 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 690216

New-Found Stem Cell Helps Regenerate Lung Tissue After Acute Injury

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers have identified a lung stem cell that repairs the organ’s gas exchange compartment. They isolated and characterized these progenitor cells from mouse and human lungs and demonstrated they are essential to repairing lung tissue damaged by severe influenza and other respiratory ailments.

Released:
27-Feb-2018 2:40 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    28-Feb-2018 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 690220

New Stem Cell Found in Lung, May Offer Target for Regenerative Medicine

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Newly identified stem cells in the lung that multiply rapidly after a pulmonary injury may offer an opportunity for innovative future treatments that harness the body’s ability to regenerate. Scientists describe cells that could become a new tool to treat lung diseases across the lifespan, from premature infants to the elderly.

Released:
27-Feb-2018 3:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 688770

Boosting a Key Protein to Help Bones That Won’t Heal

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A powerful protein inside the body helps naturally repair bone injuries. Increasing it in some patients could jump-start the process, a new rodent study finds.

Released:
1-Feb-2018 5:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 688315

Targeting Bladder Cancer’s Achilles Heel: Stem Cells

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Two different proteins work separately as well as synergistically to feed a small pool of stem cells that help bladder cancer resist chemotherapy, research led by a Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientist suggests. The finding, published online in Cancer Research, could lead to new targets to fight this deadly disease and potentially other cancers as well.

Released:
24-Jan-2018 11:00 AM EST
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