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e-cigarette, e-cig, Cardiovascular Aging New Frontiers and Old Friends, Blood Vessel Health, Smoking, vascular function, Aortic Stiffness

E-Cigarette Use Accelerates Effects of Cardiovascular Aging

A new study suggests that a single exposure to e-cigarette (e-cig) vapor may be enough to impair vascular function. Researchers from West Virginia University will present findings today at the Cardiovascular Aging: New Frontiers and Old Friends meeting in Westminster, Colo.

Medicine

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Cardiovascular Aging New Frontier and Old Friends, Menopause, Blood Vessel Health, Fitness

Menopausal Status May Better Predict Blood Vessel Health in Women Than Fitness Level

High physical fitness is known to be related to enhanced blood vessel dilation and blood flow (endothelial function) in aging men. However, for women, endothelial function and the effect of exercise may be related more to menopausal status than fitness.

Medicine

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Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure Medications, Overprescribing Medication, Hypertension, Hypotension, High Blood Pressure, Low Blood Pressure, Medical Devices, Cardiovascular Health, Aging, Cardiovascular Aging New Frontiers and Old Friends

Researchers Explore a Better Way to Measure Blood Pressure

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Automatic blood pressure devices are often used to assess blood pressure levels at home and in the clinic. But these devices are prone to significant errors, sometimes leading to the prescription of blood pressure-lowering medications to patients who don’t actually need them. Israeli researchers have developed a method to more accurately measure systolic blood pressure. They will present their findings at the Cardiovascular Aging: New Frontiers and Old Friends conference in Westminster, Colo.

Medicine

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Cardiovascular aging, HIIT Training, High Intensity Exercise, Intermittent Fasting, Caloric Restriction, Sodium intake, Nutraceuticals, Natural Food Supplements, Prebiotics, Microbiota, Passive Heat Therapy, Heart Health, Aging, Cardiovascular Aging New Frontier and Old Friends

New Strategies to Optimize and Slow Cardiovascular Aging

Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the U.S. and growing older is the greatest—and most inevitable—risk factor for it. So what, if anything, can we do to keep our hearts and arteries as healthy as possible for as long as possible? Keynote speaker Douglas Seals, PhD, of the University of Colorado Boulder, will lay the groundwork of what we know and the promising research that could combat cardiovascular aging in his presentation “Strategies for Optimal Cardiovascular Aging.” Seals will present his lecture at the Cardiovascular Aging: New Frontiers and Old Friends conference in Westminster, Colo.

Medicine

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Atrial Fibrillation, Kidney Function

Atrial Fibrillation Risk Rises with Decreasing Kidney Function

• Investigators observed a step-wise increase in the risk of atrial fibrillation with decreasing kidney function. Compared with patients without kidney disease, those with severe kidney disease had a two-fold higher risk for developing atrial fibrillation. • This link held even after accounting for a range of possible contributors, including measures of cardiovascular health, and it was consistent across subgroups of participants.

Medicine

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EXPAND Heart Pivotal Trial, Organ Care System

Vanderbilt Testing New System to Keep Donor Hearts Viable Longer

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Vanderbilt University Medical Center is one of nine centers across the United States to participate in the EXPAND Heart Pivotal Trial, which has the potential to change the way donor hearts are preserved and transported to recipients.

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Collaboration, Fibrosis, Funding, Drug Discovery, Mayo Clinc, Grant Award

Sanford Burnham Prebys and Mayo Clinic Collaborators Awarded Multi-Year NIH Grant

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A team of researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) at Lake Nona, Fla. and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. have been awarded a three-year National Institutes of Health(NIH) grant which aims to identify molecules that could become new medicines to inhibit myocardial fibrosis. Fibrosis is a major contributor to heart failure, for which there is no known cure.

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Children's Health, Childhood Obesity, Parenting, Family, School Nutrition, Diabetes, Education

Equality Isn’t Cutting It: New Campaign From American Heart Association and American Academy of Pediatrics Works for Health Equity, Too

Join our virtual press briefing on August 10 at 11 am ET to hear from these organizations about new research, stories of successful programs in communities, and experts who can speak to the need to ensure all children have access to nutritious food and safe places to be physically active.

Medicine

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Calcium, Heart Attack Risk, Heart Attack, Heart Health, Ut Southwestern

Calcium in Arteries Influences Heart Attack Risk

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Patients without calcium buildup in the coronary arteries had significantly lower risk of future heart attack or stroke despite other high risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or bad cholesterol levels, new research from UT Southwestern cardiologists shows.

Medicine

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Dr. John Noseworthy, Minnesota News Release, news release, Quality, U.S. News & World Report

Mayo Clinic ranked top hospital nationwide by U.S. News & World Report

Mayo Clinic was again named the best hospital in the country in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published on the U.S. News & World Report website today.







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