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Medicine

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Prostate Cancer, Hot Flash

What Works for Women Doesn’t Work for Men

Flushed face, sweating, a sudden rush of heat. The hot flash, the bane of menopausal women, also can affect men who are undergoing hormone therapy for prostate cancer.

Medicine

Science

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Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, Insulin, Insulin Secretion, Pancreas, Metabolic Syndrome, Beta Cell

New Map of Insulin Pathway Could Lead to Better Diabetes Drugs

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A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has created the first comprehensive roadmap of the protein interactions that enable cells in the pancreas to produce, store and secrete the hormone insulin.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Brain, Vision, Perception, Optical Illusion, Visual Cortex, Neuroscience

Finding the Place Where the Brain Creates Illusory Shapes and Surfaces

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Neuroscientists have identified the location in the brain's visual cortex responsible for generating a common perceptual illusion: seeing shapes and surfaces that don't really exist when viewing a fragmented background.

Medicine

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Duke Cancer Institute, Cancer, DNA, DNA breakage, Dna Repair, Dna Damage, nucleolin, Nucleosome

New Insights into DNA Repair Process May Spur Better Cancer Therapies

By detailing a process required for repairing DNA breakage, scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have gained a better understanding of how cells deal with the barrage of damage that can contribute to cancer and other diseases.

Science

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Andrew Dessler, Texas A&M University, Climate Change

Water Vapor In Stratosphere Plays Role In Climate

Water vapor changes in the stratosphere contribute to warmer temperatures and likely play an important role in the evolution of Earth’s climate, says a research team led by a Texas A&M University professor.

Science

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K-State, Kansas State University, Geology, Tungsten, Water, Leukemia, Aquifer, Health

Study Finds Tungsten in Aquifer Groundwater Controlled by pH, Oxygen

Geologists found that the likelihood that tungsten will seep into an aquifer's groundwater depends on the groundwater's pH level, the amount of oxygen in the aquifer and the number of oxidized particles in the water and sediment.

Medicine

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Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Obamacare, Hospital Quality, Hospital, Patient Satisfaction

Unhappy With Your Hospital? You Might Still Be Getting Great Care

Jefferson School of Population Health researcher Robert Lieberthal, PhD develops a new way to measure hospital quality - and patient satisfaction plays only a minor role. Relevant to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which links patient satisfaction to hospital reimbursement.

Medicine

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University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, hep c, Hepatitus C, Testing, Liver, Canadian Medical Association Journal, CMAJ, Dr. Jordan Feld, Diagnosis, Baby Boomer

National Screening Strategy for Hepatitis C Urged for Canada

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Canada should begin screening ‘Baby Boomers’ for the hepatitis C virus infection, since this age group is likely the largest group to have the illness, and most don’t know they have it, say a group of liver specialists in the Toronto Western Hospital Francis Family Liver Clinic. Unlike many other chronic viral infections, early treatment makes hepatitis C curable.

Medicine

Science

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Autism, Rajini Rao, NHE9

Researchers Ferret Out Function Of Autism Gene

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Researchers say it’s clear that some cases of autism are hereditary, but have struggled to draw direct links between the condition and particular genes. Now a team at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology has devised a process for connecting a suspect gene to its function in autism.

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UW Engineers Invent Programming Language to Build Synthetic DNA

A team led by the University of Washington has developed a programming language for chemistry that it hopes will streamline efforts to design a network that can guide the behavior of chemical-reaction mixtures in the same way that embedded electronic controllers guide cars, robots and other devices. The findings were published online Sept. 29 in Nature Nanotechnology.







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