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Science

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Evolution, population history, admixture, Neanderthal, Denisovan, Human Evolution, archaic, DNA

New Look at Archaic DNA Rewrites Human Evolution Story

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A U-led team developed a method for analyzing DNA sequence data to reconstruct early history of archaic human populations, revealing an evolutionary story that contradicts conventional wisdom about modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans. The Neanderthal-Denisovan lineage nearly went extinct after separating from modern humans. Just 300 generations later, Neanderthals and Denisovans diverged around 744,000 years ago. The global Neanderthal population grew to tens of thousands of individuals living in fragmented, isolated populations.

Science

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Big Data, disease classification, Genetics

Big Data Yields Surprising Connections Between Diseases

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Using health insurance claims data from more than 480,000 people in nearly 130,000 families, researchers at the University of Chicago have created a new classification of common diseases based on how often they occur among genetically-related individuals.

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Scientists Link Cutting-Edge Biodiversity Genomics with Environmental Metadata Through New Public Database

Genomic Observatories Metadatabase Will Assist Scientists Aiming to Study the Impact of Global Challenges Across Life on Earth

Medicine

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Gene Therapy, skin transplant, Obesity, Diabetes, CRISPR, glucagon-like peptide 1

Gene Therapy via Skin Could Treat Many Diseases, Even Obesity

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A research team has overcome challenges that have limited gene therapy. They demonstrate how their novel approach with skin transplantation could enable a wide range of gene-based therapies to treat human diseases. The researchers provide “proof-of-concept,” treating mice with two common related human ailments: type-2 diabetes and obesity.

Medicine

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Study: Most Newborns with Epilepsy Benefit From Genetic Testing

The younger the epilepsy begins, the more likely doctors are to find a genetic cause that may help with treatment.

Science

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Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, MHE, Yu Yamaguchi, Bone Tumors, exotoses

Steps Toward a Promising Therapy for a Rare Bone Disease

Study examines the therapeutic potential of a small molecule to treat hereditary bony tumors

Medicine

Science

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Cancer, Tumor, Metastatic Cancer, Genomics, Cancer Therapeutics, Precision Medicine, RNA sequencing, Dna Sequencing

In-Depth Analysis of Metastatic Cancer Could Enable More Precise Treatments

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HHMI Investigator Arul Chinnaiyan is using comprehensive tumor sequencing to better capture the drivers of metastatic cancer and treat the disease more effectively.

Science

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Mississippi State University, Puerto Rico, Evolution, Genetics, Epscor, Heliconius butterfly, color patterns, NSF, Biological Sciences, Phenotype, Genotype, Charles Darwin, Brian Counterman, Angus Dawe

MSU genetics and evolution study receives $1.2 million NSF grant

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Mississippi State is part of a new research collaboration sponsored by the National Science Foundation in which a colorful tropical butterfly is helping researchers investigate genetics and evolution.

Science

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Marriage of Microscopy Techniques Reveals 3D Structure of Critical Protein Complex

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Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have solved the three-dimensional structure of a complex that is essential for the correct sorting of chromosomes into eggs and sperm during reproductive cell division or meiosis.

Medicine

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Toxicity, DNA, Dna Repair, bacterial toxins, antimicrobial activity, antifungal activity

Deciphering Potent DNA Toxin’s Secrets

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One of the most potent toxins known acts by welding the two strands of the famous double helix together in a unique fashion which foils the standard repair mechanisms cells use to protect their DNA. A team of Vanderbilt University researchers have worked out the molecular details that explain how this bacterial toxin—yatakemycin (YTM)—kills cells by preventing DNA replication.







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