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Biology, Genetics, Internal Medicine, Public Health, Diseases In Developing World, infectious and emerging disease, pharmaceutial science

50-Year-Old Flu Virus Model Gets Facelift

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The scientific textbook depiction of the flu virus is about to get a facelift, due to a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine team’s discovery that a model of the influenza genome architecture untouched since the 1970s isn’t so perfect after all. The finding could give scientists the opportunity to better predict pandemics and find new ways to disrupt the flu virus.

Medicine

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MD Anderson Cancer Center, Leukemia, Lymphoma, Natural Killer Cells

Genetically Enhanced, Cord-Blood Derived Immune Cells Strike B-Cell Cancers

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Immune cells with a general knack for recognizing and killing many types of infected or abnormal cells also can be engineered to hunt down cells with specific targets on them to treat cancer, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Leukemia

Science

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human baldness, Hair Growth

UCI Study Sheds Light on Regulation of Hair Growth Across the Entire Body

To paraphrase the classic poem, no hair is an island entire of itself. Instead, University of California, Irvine scientists have discovered that all hairs can communicate with each other and grow in coordination across the entire body. This is regulated by a single molecular mechanism that adjusts by skin region to ensure efficient hair growth – so no bald patches form – and enable distinct hair densities in different body areas.

Medicine

Science

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eye, Pathogen, Immune Cells, Infection, ocular microbiome, Lysozyme, Eyelids, Conjunctiva, ocular infection, Fungus, corneal infection, C. mast, Commensal Bacteria, mice, Immunity, Microbiome

Eye Microbiome Trains Immune Cells to Fend Off Pathogens in Mice

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Bugs in your eyes may be a good thing. Resident microbes living on the eye are essential for immune responses that protect the eye from infection, new research shows. The study, which appears in the journal Immunity on July 11, demonstrates the existence of a resident ocular microbiome that trains the developing immune system to fend off pathogens. The research was conducted at the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

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Synthetic DNA-Based Zika Vaccine Protects Against Damage to Testes in Preclinical Models

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While the Zika virus is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, research has shown that the disease can affect semen and sperm and can therefore be spread through sexual intercourse.

Science

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Aging, Cellular Aging, chemical and biomolecular engineering, Biomedical Engineering

Method Determines Cell Age More Accurately, Could Help Elderly Patients

Researchers are reporting progress in developing a method to accurately determine the functional age of cells, a step that could eventually help clinicians recommend ways to delay some health effects of aging and potentially improve treatments.

Medicine

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Chemistry, single particle diffraction, Mathematics & Computer Science, Algorithms, Computational Chemistry, Data Analysis, biochemical reactions

New Berkeley Lab Algorithms Extract Biological Structure from Limited Data

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A new Berkeley Lab algorithmic framework called multi-tiered iterative phasing (M-TIP) utilizes advanced mathematical techniques to determine 3D molecular structure of important nanoobjects like proteins and viruses from very sparse sets of noisy, single-particle data.

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Bioenergy, Plant Biology

Danforth Center Study Lays Foundation of Multi-Environment Quantitative Studies

In a paper published today in PLOS Genetics researchers conducted a high-throughput phenotyping experiment to map genes that regulate plant height in the model bioenergy grass Setaria.

Medicine

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Sperm, sperm development

Single Protein Controls Genetic Network Essential for Sperm Development

Scientists have found a single protein—Ptbp2—controls a network of over 200 genes central to how developing sperm move and communicate. The protein works by regulating how RNA is processed during each stage of sperm development.

Science

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Bacteria defense, CRISPR, Cell DNA, Genetic Engineering, Molecular Biology, Genetics, Cornell University, Harvard Medical School

Bringing Bacteria’s Defense Into Focus

By taking a series of near-atomic resolution snapshots, Cornell University and Harvard Medical School scientists have observed step-by-step how bacteria defend against foreign invaders such as bacteriophage, a virus that infects bacteria.







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