Feature Channels: Cognition and Learning

Filters close
access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Jul-2020 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 15-Jul-2020 4:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Jul-2020 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 15-Jul-2020 4:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: 236733_web.jpg
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Dopamine neurons mull over your options
University of Tsukuba

In Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Indiana must choose his grail "wisely", as a poor choice spells instant death.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Light drinking may protect brain function
University of Georgia

Light to moderate drinking may preserve brain function in older age, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Older adults share fewer memories as they age
University of Arizona

By the time people reach a certain age, they've accumulated enough life experience to have plenty of stories to tell about life "back in their day."

Newswise: 236000_web.jpg
Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Native Amazonians, Americans and monkeys show similar thinking patterns
University of California, Berkeley

Humans and monkeys may not speak the same lingo, but our ways of thinking are a lot more similar than previously thought, according to new research from UC Berkeley, Harvard University and Carnegie Mellon University.

Released: 24-Jun-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Nutrition a key ingredient for cognitive health of midlife and older Canadians
University of Toronto

A new study, investigating factors associated with verbal fluency among a large sample of anglophone Canadians aged 45-85, found that individuals who consumed more vegetables and fruits and more nuts and pulses (such as lentils and beans) scored higher on tests of verbal fluency.

Newswise: UTEP Researchers Uncover New Brain Mechanisms in Fruit Flies That May Impact Future Learning
Released: 23-Jun-2020 7:50 PM EDT
UTEP Researchers Uncover New Brain Mechanisms in Fruit Flies That May Impact Future Learning
University of Texas at El Paso

A research team from The University of Texas at El Paso has made strides in understanding how memories are formed through the brain mechanisms of fruit flies. Their findings could enhance our understanding of brain disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and substance addiction.

Released: 18-Jun-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Less sleep reduces positive feelings
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Sleeping less than normal impacts how we feel the next morning.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Longitudinal Study of Brain Aging and Cognitive Change Receives $19 Million Grant
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues elsewhere, will receive almost $19 million over five years for the fourth phase of the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging, which investigates cognition, aging and the risk for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease.

Newswise: 2019_wolke_dieter.jpg
Released: 15-Jun-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Intelligence (IQ) throughout childhood to adulthood is impacted if born small for gestational age
University of Warwick

People born small for gestational age (SGA) have a lower IQ throughout development from infancy to adulthood

4-Jun-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Early-life Education Improves Memory in Old Age – Especially for Women
Georgetown University Medical Center

Education appears to protect older adults, especially women, against memory loss, according to a study by investigators at Georgetown University Medical Center, published in the journal Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition.

Newswise: san_forgetica.jpg
Released: 28-May-2020 7:05 AM EDT
Previously claimed memory boosting font “Sans Forgetica” does not actually boost memory
University of Warwick

A font called Sans Forgetica was designed to enhance people’s memory for information displayed in that font—compared to reading information in an ordinary font, such as Arial.

Released: 27-May-2020 3:20 PM EDT
Strong convictions can blind us to information that challenges them
University College London

When people are highly confident in a decision, they take in information that confirms their decision, but fail to process information which contradicts it, finds a UCL brain imaging study.

Newswise: Exercise improves memory, boosts blood flow to brain
18-May-2020 10:55 AM EDT
Exercise improves memory, boosts blood flow to brain
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Scientists have collected plenty of evidence linking exercise to brain health, with some research suggesting fitness may even improve memory. But what happens during exercise to trigger these benefits?

Newswise: Depression symptoms linked to reduced cognitive control in people with autism
Released: 19-May-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Depression symptoms linked to reduced cognitive control in people with autism
UC Davis MIND Institute

Adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and those with typical development show similar proactive cognitive control. However, symptoms of depression in individuals with autism were linked to less proactive control, a UC Davis study found.

Newswise: UIC receives $5.9M to study mood disorders, cognition
Released: 18-May-2020 4:40 PM EDT
UIC receives $5.9M to study mood disorders, cognition
University of Illinois at Chicago

The University of Illinois at Chicago has received $5.9 million from the National Institute of Mental Health for two studies that will use cognition data to predict relapses in mood disorders.

Released: 18-May-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Mindfulness training shows promise for people with MS
Ohio State University

New research suggests mindfulness training may help multiple sclerosis patients in two very different ways: regulating negative emotions and improving processing speed.

Released: 14-May-2020 5:35 PM EDT
Army researchers develop new ways to nudge the brain
Army Research Laboratory

For Army scientists, the goal of neuroscience research is pursuing the inner workings of the human brain to advance scientific understanding and improve Soldier performance.

Released: 12-May-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Our ability to focus may falter after eating one meal high in saturated fat
Ohio State University

Fatty food may feel like a friend during these troubled times, but new research suggests that eating just one meal high in saturated fat can hinder our ability to concentrate – not great news for people whose diets have gone south while they’re working at home during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Released: 11-May-2020 4:20 PM EDT
“None of Us Want to Stand Still” Documentary
Rush University Medical Center

None of Us Want to Stand Still" is a documentary made in partnership with Rush University Medical Center and Georgetown University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. The documentary shines a light onto the reality of how poorly people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are treated in the healthcare system. The film gives voice to advocates to share their stories, as well as experts' opinions on how the healthcare system can improve the treatment of persons with intellectual disabilities and on how changes can be made on all levels of a healthcare organization to better treat these patients.

Newswise: Exercise Boosts Motor Skill Learning Via Changes in Brain’s Transmitters
1-May-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Exercise Boosts Motor Skill Learning Via Changes in Brain’s Transmitters
University of California San Diego

Comparing the brains of mice that exercised with those that did not, UC San Diego researchers found that specific neurons switched their chemical signals, called neurotransmitters, following exercise, leading to improved learning for motor-skill acquisition.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins
Released: 30-Apr-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Newswise: 230019_web.jpg
Released: 28-Apr-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Two-person-together MRI scans on couples investigates how touching is perceived in the brain
Aalto University

Researchers at Aalto University and Turku PET Centre have developed a new method for simultaneous imaging brain activity from two people, allowing them to study social interaction.

Newswise:/images/icons/audio_thumb_100x75.png
AUDIO
Released: 24-Apr-2020 3:05 PM EDT
A Silent Epidemic
Harvard Medical School

After years of progress, geriatrician Sharon Inouye worries that hard-won best practices for reducing delirium risk are getting lost in the turmoil of COVID-19 care.

Newswise: Behavioral intervention, not lovastatin, improves language skills in youth with fragile X
Released: 21-Apr-2020 8:00 PM EDT
Behavioral intervention, not lovastatin, improves language skills in youth with fragile X
UC Davis Health

A UC Davis Health study found more evidence for the efficacy of behavioral intervention in treating language problems in youth with fragile X syndrome (FXS), but none for lovastatin as a treatment for FXS.

Newswise: Continued CO2 Emissions Will Impair Cognition
Released: 21-Apr-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Continued CO2 Emissions Will Impair Cognition
University of Colorado Boulder

New CU Boulder research finds that an anticipated rise in carbon dioxide concentrations in our indoor living and working spaces by the year 2100 could lead to impaired human cognition.

Newswise: FAU Scientists Receive $1.7 Million NIH Grant for Novel Neuroinflammation Study
Released: 20-Apr-2020 8:30 AM EDT
FAU Scientists Receive $1.7 Million NIH Grant for Novel Neuroinflammation Study
Florida Atlantic University

Researchers have received a $1.7 million NIH grant for a novel project that is the first to investigate how the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) influences neurotransmission through a direct action on neurons and how this action triggers behavioral changes. They will establish nIL-1R1 as a crucial link that could convert neuroinflammation to neural dysfunction, providing a new pathogenic mechanism for anxiety, depression, and cognitive dysfunction. Results from this work could suggest new targets for the treatment of psychopathology.

Newswise: Drug prevents cognitive impairment in mice after radiation treatment for brain tumors
Released: 15-Apr-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Drug prevents cognitive impairment in mice after radiation treatment for brain tumors
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers identify a possible new drug that could help prevent cognitive decline in people who undergo radiation therapy for brain tumors.

9-Apr-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Diet May Help Preserve Cognitive Function
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

According to a recent analysis of data from two major eye disease studies, adherence to the Mediterranean diet – high in vegetables, whole grains, fish, and olive oil – correlates with higher cognitive function.

Released: 9-Apr-2020 11:20 AM EDT
The way you define intelligence matters
University of Georgia

The way students view their own intelligence – their mindset – is a strong determining factor for academic performance.

6-Apr-2020 5:25 PM EDT
Does Long-Term Exposure to Air Pollution Lead to a Steeper Rate of Cognitive Decline?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People who live in urban areas with higher levels of air pollution may score lower on thinking and memory tests and may also lose cognitive skills faster over time, or it is possible they also may not, according to a study published in the April 8, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers examined the association of air pollution levels and cognitive impairment and decline in participants in two large epidemiological studies. They found an association between the air pollution and cognitive decline in one study group but not in the other.

1-Apr-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Managing Negative Thoughts Helps Combat Depression in Parkinson’s Patients
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

People with Parkinson’s disease who engage in cognitive behavioral therapy — a form of psychotherapy that increases awareness of negative thinking and teaches coping skills — are more likely to overcome depression and anxiety, according to a Rutgers study.

25-Mar-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Better controlled diabetes is associated with preserved cognitive function following stroke
Endocrine Society

Better glucose control can help people with diabetes who have a common type of stroke to preserve their cognitive function, according to a study accepted for presentation at ENDO 2020, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting. The abstract will be published in a special supplemental issue of the Journal of the Endocrine Society.

23-Mar-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Study: An Aspirin a Day Does Not Keep Dementia at Bay
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Taking a low-dose aspirin once a day does not reduce the risk of thinking and memory problems caused by mild cognitive impairment or probable Alzheimer’s disease, nor does it slow the rate of cognitive decline, according to a large study published in the March 25, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Five language outcome measures evaluated for intellectual disabilities studies
23-Mar-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Five language outcome measures evaluated for intellectual disabilities studies
UC Davis Health

Expressive language sampling yielded five language-related outcome measures that may be useful for treatment studies in intellectual disabilities, especially fragile X syndrome. The measures were generally valid and reliable across the range of ages, IQs and autism symptom severity of participants. According to the study, led by UC Davis researchers and funded by NIH, the measures are also functional in supporting treatments that can improve language, providing far reaching benefits for individuals with intellectual disabilities.

17-Mar-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Neuroimaging links brain region to poor spatial navigation in children affected by prenatal alcohol exposure
Research Society on Alcoholism

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) describe the range of effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE). The most severe forms of FASD are fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and partial fetal alcohol syndrome (PFAS), which have adverse effects on learning and memory and result in observable physical abnormalities, including a distinct pattern of facial dysmorphic features, small head circumference, and growth restriction. Identifying the specific brain regions affected is important to fully understand the impact of PAE. Poor spatial skills are common in children with FASD, and tests of navigation in rodents – and more recently, humans – have linked PAE to impairment in ‘place learning’ (the learning of physical positions or locations of objects). Place learning in rodents and humans depends on the hippocampus, a small seahorse-shaped structure in each side of the brain. The hippocampus is particularly sensitive to PAE and is smaller in people (and rodents) exposed to alcohol in

12-Mar-2020 3:30 PM EDT
People Prone to Disengage from Difficult Tasks and Goals May Experience Greater Cognitive Decline After Retirement
American Psychological Association (APA)

Certain middle-aged and older adults, especially women who tend to disengage from difficult tasks and goals after they retire, may be at greater risk of cognitive decline as they age, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 12-Mar-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Surgery with anesthesia not associated with leading indicator of Alzheimer’s disease, Mayo Clinic study finds
Mayo Clinic

Older adults who have surgery with general anesthesia may experience a modest acceleration of cognitive decline, even years later. But there's no evidence of a link to Alzheimer's disease, according to new research from Mayo Clinic.

Released: 11-Mar-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Majority of Physician Anesthesiologists Treat Older Adults, But Less than 10% Screen for Frailty or Dementia Pre- or Postoperatively, Survey Finds
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

A national, non-scientific survey from the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) finds that more than 96% of respondents treated a patient 65 or older in 2018. However, despite guidelines, more than 80% physician anesthesiologists rarely or never perform preoperative screening for cognitive impairment or frailty for older surgical patients.

Released: 6-Mar-2020 4:10 PM EST
Improving detection of prenatal alcohol exposure using complementary tools
Research Society on Alcoholism

Drinking while pregnant can harm the developing fetus, leading to physical, cognitive, and neurobehavioral effects that may persist into adulthood. No safe level of alcohol in pregnancy has been identified, and many guidelines now recommend total abstinence. However, prenatal drinking remains common, particularly early on before women are aware of their pregnancy.

24-Feb-2020 11:10 AM EST
Walking, Gardening, Swimming, Dancing May Prevent Brain Shrinkage in Older Adults
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Older people who regularly walk, garden, swim or dance may have bigger brains than their inactive peers, according to a preliminary study to be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020. The effect of exercise was equal to four fewer years of brain aging.

Released: 4-Mar-2020 8:00 AM EST
Household chemical use linked to child language delays
Ohio State University

Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found.

Released: 4-Mar-2020 3:05 AM EST
Safe Tackling, Padded Helmets Lower Head Injuries in Youth Football
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Middle school football players greatly reduce the chance of head injuries if they wear padded helmets and use safe tackling and blocking techniques, according to Rutgers researchers.

Newswise: Not a ‘math person’? You may be better at learning to code than you think
27-Feb-2020 1:55 PM EST
Not a ‘math person’? You may be better at learning to code than you think
University of Washington

New research from the University of Washington finds that a natural aptitude for learning languages is a stronger predictor of learning to program than basic math knowledge.

24-Feb-2020 10:25 AM EST
Heart Health Problems in Your 20s May Affect Brain Health Decades Later
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Having health issues such as smoking, high cholesterol or a high body mass index (BMI) in your 20s may make you more likely to have problems with thinking and memory skills and even the brain’s ability to properly regulate its blood flow, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020.

Released: 26-Feb-2020 2:30 PM EST
Does smoking increase your risk for dementia and cognitive decline?
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

Scientists from the Uniformed Services University (USU), Emory University and the University of Vermont have found that cigarette smoking is linked to increased lesions in the brain’s white matter, called white matter hyperintensities. White matter hyperintensities, detected by MRI scan, are associated with cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. These findings may help explain the link between smoking and increased rates of dementia and other forms of cognitive decline.

Released: 26-Feb-2020 8:55 AM EST
Antioxidant Precursor Molecule Could Improve Brain Function in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis
Thomas Jefferson University

The naturally occurring molecule N-acetylcysteine (NAC) shows benefit in a clinical trial for multiple sclerosis.


Showing results

150 of 1228

close
4.65765