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Embargo will expire: 13-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT

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Embargo will expire: 15-Jul-2020 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Jul-2020 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jul-2020 2:55 PM EDT

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Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
More Than Meets the Eye
Harvard Medical School

New findings reframe the traditional view of face blindness as a disorder arising strictly from deficits in visual perception of facial features Findings suggest prosopagnosia may be a more complex disorder rooted in multiple deficits Findings can help inform the design of tools to improve face recognition in those with the condition

Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Gene yields insights into the causes of neurodegeneration
Cornell University

Cornell researchers including Fenghua Hu, associate professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and member of the Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, are taking a closer look at the factors that cause Alzheimer’s, FTLD and similar diseases. Hu’s latest study, “A role of the frontotemporal lobar degeneration risk factor TMEM106B in myelination,” was published June 23 in the journal Brain.

7-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Simple Blood Test May Predict Concussion Severity Just as Well as Spinal Tap
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A blood biomarker in people who have had concussions may be just as accurate at predicting the severity of the injury and how long it will last as biomarkers that are obtained through more expensive and invasive tests, according to a study published in the July 8, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
UBC research shows hearing persists at end of life
University of British Columbia

Hearing is widely thought to be the last sense to go in the dying process. Now UBC researchers have evidence that some people may still be able to hear while in an unresponsive state at the end of their life.

Newswise: Researchers pioneer early diagnostic tool for Parkinson’s
Released: 7-Jul-2020 6:25 PM EDT
Researchers pioneer early diagnostic tool for Parkinson’s
University of South Australia

University of South Australia researchers are pioneering a new method to more accurately diagnose Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative brain disorder which affects around 10 million people worldwide, resulting in a loss of control of body movements.

Newswise: Seaver Autism Center For Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai Launches First Drug Trial for ADNP Syndrome
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Seaver Autism Center For Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai Launches First Drug Trial for ADNP Syndrome
Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers at the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai have started recruiting participants for a new clinical trial to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of a low dose of ketamine in children diagnosed with ADNP syndrome (also known as Helsmoortel-VanDerAa syndrome), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the activity dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) gene.

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Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Dopamine neurons mull over your options
University of Tsukuba

In Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Indiana must choose his grail "wisely", as a poor choice spells instant death.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:00 PM EDT
McLean Hospital's Diego A. Pizzagalli, PhD, Named Editor of Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
McLean Hospital

McLean Hospital’s Diego A. Pizzagalli, PhD, has been named editor of the journal Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience (CABN).

Newswise: Tulane University receives $12.5 million for military veteran care
Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Tulane University receives $12.5 million for military veteran care
Tulane University

Tulane University, nationally renowned for the care it provides to retired professional athletes through partnerships with the NFL Player Care Foundation and The Trust (Powered by the NFLPA), has received a $12.5 million gift from The Avalon Fund for the creation of the Tulane University Center for Brain Health. The center will specialize in the treatment of traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in U.S. military veterans, beginning in the fall of 2020.

7-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Sensory Neurons Outside the Brain Drive Autistic Social Behaviors, Penn Study Suggests
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new study from Penn Medicine lends further evidence that the social behaviors tied to autism spectrum disorders (ASD) emerge from abnormal function of sensory neurons outside the brain.

Newswise: The science of sound: Researchers suggest use of artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark
Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:35 AM EDT
The science of sound: Researchers suggest use of artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark
McMaster University

Researchers at McMaster University who study how the brain processes sound have discovered the common practice of using artificial tones in perception experiments could mean scientists are overlooking important and interesting discoveries in the field of brain research

Newswise: A 360-Degree Approach to Lyme Disease
Released: 6-Jul-2020 11:45 AM EDT
A 360-Degree Approach to Lyme Disease
Harvard Medical School

Harvard Medical School receives a $5 million gift for Lyme disease research, education

Newswise: Study pinpoints new function for histones
Released: 2-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Study pinpoints new function for histones
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Scientists discovered that histones act as an enzyme that converts copper into a form that can be used by the cells. The finding refutes earlier theories that copper spontaneously converts in the body into a usable state.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Researchers outline adapted health communications principles for the COVID-19 pandemic
CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy

The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced unique challenges for public health practitioners and health communicators that warrant an expansion of existing health communication principles to take into consideration.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Sniffing Out Smell
Harvard Medical School

Neuroscientists reveal for the first time how relationships between different odors are encoded in the brain. Findings may explain why individuals have common but highly personalized experiences with smell, and inform efforts to understand how odor chemistry is translated into perception.

Newswise:Video Embedded understanding-the-circadian-clocks-of-individual-cells
VIDEO
Released: 2-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Understanding The Circadian Clocks of Individual Cells
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – July 2, 2020 – Two new studies led by UT Southwestern scientists outline how individual cells maintain their internal clocks, driven both through heritable and random means. These findings, published online May 1 in PNAS and May 27 in eLife, help explain how organisms’ circadian clocks maintain flexibility and could offer insights into aging and cancer.

26-Jun-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Does Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Increase Risk of Dementia?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

There’s good news for people with Parkinson’s disease. A new study shows that deep brain stimulation may not increase the risk of developing dementia. The study is published in the July 1, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Study shows asthma drug salbutamol's potential as Alzheimer's treatment
Lancaster University

A new study reveals that the common asthma drug salbutamol may offer potential as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

Newswise: New Drug Reduces Stroke Damage in Mice
29-Jun-2020 12:35 PM EDT
New Drug Reduces Stroke Damage in Mice
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Mice that received an injection of a new experimental drug, TAT-DP-2, after a stroke had smaller areas of damage, and their long-term neurological function was better than that of untreated animals.

Newswise: Case Western Reserve University-led team develops new approach to treat certain neurological diseases
29-Jun-2020 7:20 PM EDT
Case Western Reserve University-led team develops new approach to treat certain neurological diseases
Case Western Reserve University

A team led by Case Western Reserve University medical researchers has developed a potential treatment method for Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD), a fatal neurological disorder that produces severe movement, motor and cognitive dysfunction in children. It results from genetic mutations that prevent the body from properly making myelin, the protective insulation around nerve cells.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Penn Launches Region’s First Center for Translational Neuromodulation
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The Penn Brain Science, Translation, Innovation, and Modulation (brainSTIM) Center brings together a team of leading neuroscientists, neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and engineers at Penn using neuromodulation techniques to research, repair, and enhance human brain function—the first translational center of its kind in the region.

Newswise: The 2020 July Issue of Neurosurgical Focus Examines the Brain-Machine Interface
24-Jun-2020 11:25 AM EDT
The 2020 July Issue of Neurosurgical Focus Examines the Brain-Machine Interface
Journal of Neurosurgery

Announcement of the contents of the 2020 July issue of Neurosurgical Focus.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Light drinking may protect brain function
University of Georgia

Light to moderate drinking may preserve brain function in older age, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

It seems there will never be enough “thank you’s” for the incredible doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff members who are working around the clock to help patients who have the dangerous coronavirus disease. The dedication, determination and spirit enable Johns Hopkins to deliver the promise of medicine.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Older adults share fewer memories as they age
University of Arizona

By the time people reach a certain age, they've accumulated enough life experience to have plenty of stories to tell about life "back in their day."

Released: 30-Jun-2020 7:55 AM EDT
Novel pathology could improve diagnosis and treatment of Huntington’s and other diseases
University of Bristol

Bristol scientists have discovered a novel pathology that occurs in several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington’s disease. The article, published in Brain Pathology, describes how SAFB1 expression occurs in both spinocerebellar ataxias and Huntington's disease and may be a common marker of these conditions, which have a similar genetic background.

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Released: 29-Jun-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Artificial intelligence identifies, locates seizures in real-time
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has shown that understanding brain activity as a network instead of readings from an EEG allow for more accurate and efficient detection of seizures in real-time.

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Released: 29-Jun-2020 12:50 PM EDT
How upregulation of a single gene by SARS-CoV-2 can result in a cytokine storm
IOS Press

The SARS-CoV-19 virus initially has a limited capability to invade, attacking only one intracellular genetic target, the aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs).

Released: 26-Jun-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Designer Peptides Show Potential for Blocking Viruses, Encourage Future Study
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Chemically engineered peptides, designed and developed by a team of researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, could prove valuable in the battle against some of the most persistent human health challenges. The team’s findings, recently published in Nature Scientific Reports, demonstrate how researchers can engineer peptides capable of selectively and specifically binding to polysialic acid (PSA) — a unique carbohydrate that is present on critical human cells and plays a key role in various physiological and pathological processes, including neurological development and disease progression.

Released: 26-Jun-2020 10:35 AM EDT
It’s not just Alzheimer’s disease: Sanders-Brown research highlights form of severe dementia
University of Kentucky

The long-running study on aging and brain health at the University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Center has once again resulted in important new findings – highlighting a complex and under-recognized form of dementia.

Newswise:Video Embedded uri-engineering-professor-helping-als-patients-use-their-brains-to-communicate
VIDEO
Released: 25-Jun-2020 9:05 PM EDT
URI engineering professor helping ALS patients use their brains to communicate
University of Rhode Island

Doug Sawyer was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, 11 years ago.

Released: 25-Jun-2020 1:45 PM EDT
BIDMC’s Research & Health News Digest: June 2020 Edition
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

A monthly roundup of research briefs showcasing recent scientific advances led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center faculty.

Released: 25-Jun-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Better sleep with a partner
Frontiers

In many countries, sharing a bed with a partner is common practice. Yet, research investigating the relationship between bed sharing and sleep quality is both scarce and contradictory.

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Released: 25-Jun-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Variability in natural speech is challenging for the dyslexic brain
University of Helsinki

A new study brings neural-level evidence that the continuous variation in natural speech makes the discrimination of phonemes challenging for adults suffering from developmental reading-deficit dyslexia.

Newswise: A deeper dive into epilepsy: Integrating tools for characterizing focal cortical dysplasia
Released: 24-Jun-2020 6:45 PM EDT
A deeper dive into epilepsy: Integrating tools for characterizing focal cortical dysplasia
International League Against Epilepsy

Journal Prize winner Zhong Ying integrated genetics, clinical presentation, EEG, MRI, and histopathological diagnosis in a group of people with drug-resistant epilepsy. All had a specific type of brain lesion that can be difficult to identify.

Newswise: Bridging the information gap with new EEG techniques for epilepsy
Released: 24-Jun-2020 6:40 PM EDT
Bridging the information gap with new EEG techniques for epilepsy
International League Against Epilepsy

Journal Prize winner Ana Coito is developing methods to extract information from EEG readings about brain connectivity and information exchange. Her award-winning research focused on applying these methods to low-density EEG readings, which would make them accessible to more regions of the world.

Newswise: Harnessing complexity to advance epilepsy research: Learning the language of EEG spike-wave discharges
Released: 24-Jun-2020 6:40 PM EDT
Harnessing complexity to advance epilepsy research: Learning the language of EEG spike-wave discharges
International League Against Epilepsy

Journal Prize winner Jesse A. Pfammatter found that certain EEG patterns that indicate absence epilepsy may hold more information than previously thought.

19-Jun-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Why Do More Women Have Alzheimer’s than Men? It’s Not Just from Living Longer
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Middle-aged women are more likely than men to have changes in the brain related to Alzheimer’s disease, as detected by imaging, even when there are no differences in thinking and memory. This may be associated with hormonal changes due to menopause, specifically the loss of estrogen, according to a study published in the June 24, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-study-finds-distinctive-neurological-pattern-in-injured-havana-embassy-staff
VIDEO
Released: 24-Jun-2020 2:20 PM EDT
New Study Finds Distinctive Neurological Pattern in Injured Havana Embassy Staff
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

A new study published in Frontiers in Neurology has found a distinctive neurological pattern among U.S. Embassy staffers and family members who were injured three years ago while stationed in Havana, Cuba. By analyzing videos taken during initial clinical evaluations, researchers from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine found staffers with neurological impairments had similar changes in eye movements and pupil responses.

Newswise: One-Time Treatment Generates New Neurons, Eliminates Parkinson’s Disease in Mice
18-Jun-2020 4:25 PM EDT
One-Time Treatment Generates New Neurons, Eliminates Parkinson’s Disease in Mice
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers have discovered that a single treatment to inhibit a gene called PTB in mice converts native astrocytes, brain support cells, into neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. As a result, the mice’s Parkinson’s disease symptoms disappear.

Newswise:Video Embedded researchers-discover-cellular-structure-of-poorly-understood-visual-brain-region
VIDEO
Released: 24-Jun-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Researchers discover cellular structure of poorly understood visual brain region
Virginia Tech

The brain’s ventral lateral geniculate nucleus (vLGN) receives signals from the eye, but it is not associated with classical image-forming. For decades little was known about this brain region’s cellular structure and purpose. In a new study, Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC neuroscientists reveal newly identified brain cell subtypes unique to this region that form a striking layered formation.

19-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Transgenic rice lowers blood pressure of hypertensive rats
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have made transgenic rice that contains several anti-hypertensive peptides. When given to hypertensive rats, the rice lowered their blood pressure.


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