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More than a knee injury: ACL tears cause harmful changes in our brain structure

University of Michigan

It's known that some joint function is often permanently lost after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and re-injury is common even with intensive physical therapy, but it's unclear why.

Channels: All Journal News, Healthcare, Neuro, Surgery,

Released:
28-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
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    28-Jan-2020 3:05 AM EST

AI-analyzed blood test can predict the progression of neurodegenerative disease

The Neuro - Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital

Evaluating the effectiveness of therapies for neurodegenerative diseases is often difficult because each patient’s progression is different. A new study shows artificial intelligence (AI) analysis of blood samples can predict and explain disease progression, which could one day help doctors choose more appropriate and effective treatments for patients.

Channels: Aging, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Artificial Intelligence, Blood, Clinical Trials, Neuro, All Journal News,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 11:50 AM EST
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Newswise: A Brain Link to STI/HIV Sexual Risk: Young women with Low Condom Use During Sex Find Visual Sexual Cues Less Pleasant and Less Evocative

A Brain Link to STI/HIV Sexual Risk: Young women with Low Condom Use During Sex Find Visual Sexual Cues Less Pleasant and Less Evocative

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Data show that young adult women in the United States have high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that increase their risk of HIV. Though epidemiologic and behavioral factors for risk have been studied, we know very little about brain factors that may be linked to STI/ HIV sexual risk.

Channels: AIDS and HIV, All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Neuro, Nursing, Sex and Relationships, Women's Health,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 2:30 PM EST
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Newswise: Parkinson's Disease May Start Before Birth
  • Embargo expired:
    27-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST

Parkinson's Disease May Start Before Birth

Cedars-Sinai

People who develop Parkinson's disease before age 50 may have been born with disordered brain cells that went undetected for decades, according to EMBARGOED Cedars-Sinai research that will publish Jan. 27 in the journal Nature Medicine. The research points to a drug that potentially might help correct these disease processes.

Channels: All Journal News, Neuro, Parkinson’s Disease, Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells, Staff Picks,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 2:05 PM EST
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Autism Diagnosis Test Needs Improvement, Rutgers Researchers Say

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers researchers have found that a test widely used to diagnose whether children have autism is less reliable than previously assumed.

Channels: All Journal News, Autism, Behavioral Science, Children's Health, Healthcare, Neuro, Technology,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: New drug that could aid earlier MS diagnoses approved by FDA for first human clinical trials

New drug that could aid earlier MS diagnoses approved by FDA for first human clinical trials

Case Western Reserve University

A new drug that could make it easier for doctors to diagnose multiple sclerosis (MS) in its earlier stages has been approved for its first human trials by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Channels: All Journal News, Clinical Trials, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Neuro, Pharmaceuticals, Grant Funded News, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
27-Jan-2020 7:30 AM EST
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Horror movies manipulate brain activity expertly to enhance excitement

University of Turku (Turun yliopisto)

Finnish research team maps neural activity in response to watching horror movies. A study conducted by the University of Turku shows the top horror movies of the past 100 years, and how they manipulate brain activity.

Channels: All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry, Staff Picks,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 4:05 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: UCI researchers identify a connection between early life adversity and opioid addiction

UCI researchers identify a connection between early life adversity and opioid addiction

University of California, Irvine

Individuals with a history of early life adversity (ELA) are disproportionately prone to opioid addiction. A new UCI-led study reveals why. Published in Molecular Psychiatry, the study titled, “On the early life origins of vulnerability to opioid addiction,” examines how early adversities interact with factors such as increased access to opioids to directly influence brain development and function, causing a higher potential for opioid addiction.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Genetics, Mental Health, Psychology and Psychiatry, Substance Abuse, Neuro, Staff Picks,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 2:25 PM EST
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    24-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

High Air Pollution Exposure in One-Year-Olds Linked to Structural Brain Changes at Age 12

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

A new study suggests that significant early childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) is associated with structural changes in the brain at the age of 12. The Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center study found that children with higher levels of TRAP exposure at birth had reductions at age 12 in gray matter volume and cortical thickness as compared to children with lower levels of exposure.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Cognition and Learning, Environmental Health, Neuro, Pollution, PLOS ONE,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 1:25 PM EST
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Opioid Dependence Found to Permanently Change Brains of Rats

University of California San Diego Health

Approximately one-quarter of patients who are prescribed opioids for chronic pain misuse them, with five to 10 percent developing an opioid use disorder or addiction. In a new study, UC San Diego researchers found that opioid dependence produced permanent changes in the brains of rats.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Mental Health, Neuro, Pain, Psychology and Psychiatry, Substance Abuse, National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), PNAS, Staff Picks,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 1:05 PM EST
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