Feature Channels: Regenerative Medicine

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Newswise: Ronke_Science_Headshot-copy-768x585.jpg
Released: 12-May-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Helping humans heal
University of California, Irvine

In a lab on the upper floors of Engineering Hall, something is growing. It’s not a plant. And it’s not an animal. What Ronke Olabisi is growing in her lab is us. From new skin and retinal tissue to hearts and livers, she’s developing the tools to rebuild and repair the human body. A UCI assistant professor of biomedical engineering, Olabisi has been working with regenerative tissue for the better part of seven years, using a hydrogel based on polyethylene glycol diacrylate.

Newswise: Bioengineering Approach for Functional Muscle Regeneration
10-May-2021 11:20 AM EDT
Bioengineering Approach for Functional Muscle Regeneration
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

When trauma, illness, or injury causes significant muscle loss, reconstructive procedures for bioengineering functional skeletal muscles can fall short, resulting in permanent impairments. Finding a synergy in the importance of biochemical signals and topographical cues, researchers developed an efficient technique for muscle regeneration and functional restoration in injured rats. They describe results from the technique in Applied Physics Reviews.

Released: 5-May-2021 11:05 AM EDT
UCI biomedical engineers spotlight disparities in knee and jaw joint treatments
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., May 5, 2021 – If you haven’t had knee surgery, you may have a friend or relative who has. But do you know anyone who has had an operation on their jaw? Although the temporomandibular joint is crucial to speaking, chewing and even breathing, treatments for TMJ disorders are far less common than those for the knee.

Newswise: Using 4D Printing To Enable Vascularization, Bone Tissue Regeneration, Spinal Fusion
30-Apr-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Using 4D Printing To Enable Vascularization, Bone Tissue Regeneration, Spinal Fusion
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

There has been marked increase in the number of people over 65 who have needed spinal fusion surgery, and many researchers have focused on trying to create a biomimetic scaffold that induces vascularization. In Applied Physics Reviews, researchers present a solution to address the challenge: The team designed a microchannel scaffold made of a collagen and hydroxyapitite combination, with each strut consisting of micrometer-scaled microchannels. The microchannels have induced growth of blood vessels in a mouse model.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Mayo Clinic preclinical discovery triggers wound healing, skin regeneration
Mayo Clinic

Difficult-to-treat, chronic wounds in preclinical models healed with normal scar-free skin after treatment with an acellular product discovered at Mayo Clinic. Derived from platelets, the purified exosomal product, known as PEP, was used to deliver healing messages into cells of preclinical animal models of ischemic wounds. The Mayo Clinic research team documented restoration of skin integrity, hair follicles, sweat glands, skin oils and normal hydration. Ischemic wounds occur when arteries are clogged or blocked, preventing important nutrients and oxygen from reaching the skin to drive repair. This groundbreaking study titled, "TGF-β Donor Exosome Accelerates Ischemic Wound Healing," is published in Theranostics.

Newswise: Chemical cocktail activates stem cells, promotes repair after muscle damage
Released: 26-Apr-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Chemical cocktail activates stem cells, promotes repair after muscle damage
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

The technique used in this preclinical study could aid tissue regeneration following severe accidents, surgical resections, or progressive muscle loss due to age or genetic disease.

Newswise: Discovery of an elusive cell type in fish sensory organs
Released: 26-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Discovery of an elusive cell type in fish sensory organs
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

The Piotrowski Lab has reported newly identified invasive ionocytes in the sensory organs of larval and adult zebrafish fish that may provide clues to how sensory organs continue to function in changing environments.

Newswise:Video Embedded audacious-projects-develop-imaging-technology-to-aid-eye-tissue-regeneration2
VIDEO
Released: 22-Apr-2021 2:15 PM EDT
Audacious projects develop imaging technology to aid eye tissue regeneration
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

As regenerative therapies for blinding diseases move closer to clinical trials, the National Eye Institute’s functional imaging consortium, a part of the NEI Audacious Goals Initiative (AGI), is pioneering noninvasive technologies to monitor the function of the retina’s light-sensing neurons and their connections to the brain.

Newswise: Stem cell therapy promotes recovery from stroke and dementia in mice
Released: 21-Apr-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Stem cell therapy promotes recovery from stroke and dementia in mice
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A one-time injection of an experimental stem cell therapy can repair brain damage and improve memory function in mice with conditions that replicate human strokes and dementia, a new UCLA study finds.

Newswise: Novel Drug Regenerates Erectile Nerves Damaged by Prostate Surgery
14-Apr-2021 4:45 PM EDT
Novel Drug Regenerates Erectile Nerves Damaged by Prostate Surgery
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have developed a topical drug that regenerates and restores the function of erectile nerves damaged by radical prostatectomy, the most common treatment for localized prostate cancer. The drug was tested in rats, and the findings were published online today in JCI Insight.

Newswise:Video Embedded brain-glue-helps-repair-circuitry-in-severe-tbi
VIDEO
Released: 7-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
‘Brain glue’ helps repair circuitry in severe TBI
University of Georgia

Reparative hydrogel mimics the composition and mechanics of the brain

Newswise: Chemical cocktail creates new avenues for generating muscle stem cells
Released: 18-Mar-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Chemical cocktail creates new avenues for generating muscle stem cells
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A UCLA-led research team has identified a chemical cocktail that enables the production of large numbers of muscle stem cells, which can self-renew and give rise to all types of skeletal muscle cells.

Newswise: CHOP Researchers Find Ribosome Assembly Essential for Stem Cell Regeneration
10-Mar-2021 11:05 AM EST
CHOP Researchers Find Ribosome Assembly Essential for Stem Cell Regeneration
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified genes responsible for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) regeneration via the assembly of the ribosome, the protein factories in cells that translate mRNA sequences into amino acid sequences. The findings, which were published in Cell Stem Cell, highlight the importance of proper ribosome assembly in stem cell regeneration and identify possible targets for future therapies for ribosomopathies, childhood disorders that lead to bone marrow failure (BMF).

Newswise: Putting A Protein Into Overdrive to Heal Spinal Cord Injuries
2-Mar-2021 2:30 PM EST
Putting A Protein Into Overdrive to Heal Spinal Cord Injuries
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Using genetic engineering, researchers at UT Southwestern and Indiana University have reprogrammed scar-forming cells in mouse spinal cords to create new nerve cells, spurring recovery after spinal cord injury. The findings, published online today in Cell Stem Cell, could offer hope for the hundreds of thousands of people worldwide who suffer a spinal cord injury each year.

Released: 3-Mar-2021 4:40 PM EST
Pericardial Injection Effective, Less Invasive Way to Get Regenerative Therapies to Heart
North Carolina State University

Injecting hydrogels containing stem cell or exosome therapeutics directly into the pericardial cavity could be a less invasive, less costly, and more effective means of treating cardiac injury.

Newswise: Scientists Identify Cells Responsible For Liver Tissue Maintenance And Regeneration
23-Feb-2021 2:00 PM EST
Scientists Identify Cells Responsible For Liver Tissue Maintenance And Regeneration
UT Southwestern Medical Center

While the amazing regenerative power of the liver has been known since ancient times, the cells responsible for maintaining and replenishing the liver have remained a mystery. Now, research from the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) has identified the cells responsible for liver maintenance and regeneration while also pinpointing where they reside in the liver.

Newswise: David Kaplan Elected to National Academy of Engineering
Released: 24-Feb-2021 10:55 AM EST
David Kaplan Elected to National Academy of Engineering
Tufts University

David Kaplan, the Stern Family Professor of Engineering at Tufts University School of Engineering, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering in recognition of his contributions to silk-based materials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Newswise: Evan Snyder named Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering
Released: 23-Feb-2021 8:00 AM EST
Evan Snyder named Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has elected to its College of Fellows Evan Y. Snyder, M.D., Ph.D., professor and founding director of the Center for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute. Snyder was nominated, reviewed, and elected by his peers and members of the College of Fellows for his seminal contributions to regenerative medicine.

Newswise: Brain organoids grown in lab mature much like infant brains
18-Feb-2021 6:05 PM EST
Brain organoids grown in lab mature much like infant brains
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new study from UCLA and Stanford University researchers finds that three-dimensional human stem cell-derived brain organoids can mature in a manner that is strikingly similar to human brain development.

Newswise: Recent FDA Designation Puts Promising Engineered Cellular Therapy that Reduces Complications of Lymphoma Treatment on Accelerated Path to Market Approval
Released: 16-Feb-2021 8:05 AM EST
Recent FDA Designation Puts Promising Engineered Cellular Therapy that Reduces Complications of Lymphoma Treatment on Accelerated Path to Market Approval
Hackensack Meridian Health

In November 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted Regenerative Medicine Advanced Therapy (RMAT) designation for a promising engineered cellular therapy called AB-205. AB-205 acts promptly to repair injured vascular niches of organs to prevent or reduce severe toxicities in patients who have Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) undergoing high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantion.

Released: 12-Feb-2021 8:45 AM EST
Lin Han, PhD, receives 2021 Kappa Delta Young Investigator Award for the study of cartilage function, regeneration and disease intervention in osteoarthritis
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

The 2021 Kappa Delta Young Investigator Award was presented to Lin Han, PhD, for research on the structure and function of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) and its impact on tissue regeneration and disease evolution in osteoarthritis (OA).

Released: 12-Feb-2021 8:30 AM EST
Kappa Delta Ann Doner Vaughn Award Presented to Cato T. Laurencin, MD, PhD, FAAOSfor pioneering research in bone regenerative engineering
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

Cato T. Laurencin, MD, PhD, was named the 2021 Kappa Delta Ann Doner Vaughn Award recipient for his 30 years of scientific research in musculoskeletal regenerative engineering, the field which he founded and brought to the forefront of translational medicine.

Newswise:Video Embedded johns-hopkins-scientists-find-mammals-share-gene-pathways-that-allow-zebrafish-to-grow-new-eyes
VIDEO
Released: 11-Feb-2021 1:45 PM EST
Johns Hopkins Scientists Find Mammals Share Gene Pathways That Allow Zebrafish To Grow New Eyes
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals’ natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals. Specifically, the researchers found that some genetic pathways that allow many fish and other cold-blooded animals to repair specialized eye neurons after injury remain present in mammals as well, but are turned off, blocking regeneration and healing.

Newswise: 256001_web.jpg
Released: 10-Feb-2021 2:25 PM EST
A recipe for regenerating bioengineered hair
RIKEN

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research in Japan have discovered a recipe for continuous cyclical regeneration of cultured hair follicles from hair follicle stem cells.

Released: 9-Feb-2021 12:05 PM EST
Promising Approach to Urinary Bladder Tissue Regeneration
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Scientists from Stanley Manne Children’s Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago were able to regenerate functional urinary bladder tissue in a rodent model using human bone marrow derived stem and progenitor cells. Their findings, published in Scientific Reports, offer great promise to children suffering from end stage bladder dysfunction, for whom surgery carries significant risks.

Newswise: LA based company donates masks to science institute in NC
Released: 5-Jan-2021 2:40 PM EST
LA based company donates masks to science institute in NC
Wake Forest Baptist Health

LA based company Harmony Farms Inc. donates masks to the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in NC.

Newswise: Cormac the Llama Yields Antibodies that may Prove Effective Against COVID-19 Infection
Released: 22-Dec-2020 10:15 AM EST
Cormac the Llama Yields Antibodies that may Prove Effective Against COVID-19 Infection
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

Researchers from the Uniformed Services University (USU) recently identified pint-sized antibodies, or “nanobodies,” that could protect against COVID-19. At least one of these nanobodies – produced by a llama named Cormac – also appears to work well in either liquid or aerosol form, suggesting it could also help protect a person’s lungs from infections.

Newswise: Leaders in stem cell science, regenerative medicine combine efforts in 2021
Released: 14-Dec-2020 7:00 AM EST
Leaders in stem cell science, regenerative medicine combine efforts in 2021
Wake Forest Baptist Health

Leaders in stem cell science and regenerative medicine will combine two separate courses into one in June 2021.

7-Dec-2020 9:00 AM EST
Gene therapy injection in one eye surprises scientists by improving vision in both
University of Cambridge

Injecting a gene therapy vector into one eye of someone suffering from LHON, the most common cause of mitochondrial blindness, significantly improves vision in both eyes, scientists have found.

Newswise: Scientists discover how COVID-19 virus causes multiple organ failure in mice
Released: 7-Dec-2020 4:30 PM EST
Scientists discover how COVID-19 virus causes multiple organ failure in mice
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers are the first to create a version of COVID-19 in mice that shows how the disease damages organs other than the lungs. Using their model, the scientists discovered that the SARS-CoV-2 virus can shut down energy production in cells of the heart, kidneys, spleen and other organs.

Newswise: Synthetic Biology and Machine Learning Speed the Creation of Lab-Grown Livers
1-Dec-2020 11:20 AM EST
Synthetic Biology and Machine Learning Speed the Creation of Lab-Grown Livers
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have combined synthetic biology with a machine learning algorithm to create human liver organoids with blood and bile handling systems. When implanted into mice with failing livers, the lab-grown replacement livers extended life.

Newswise: Development of New Stem Cell Type May Lead to Advances In Regenerative Medicine
Released: 3-Dec-2020 11:00 AM EST
Development of New Stem Cell Type May Lead to Advances In Regenerative Medicine
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Dec. 3, 2020 – A team led by UT Southwestern has derived a new “intermediate” embryonic stem cell type from multiple species that can contribute to chimeras and create precursors to sperm and eggs in a culture dish.

Newswise: World’s first: Drug guides stem cells to desired location, improving their ability to heal
Released: 24-Nov-2020 7:25 AM EST
World’s first: Drug guides stem cells to desired location, improving their ability to heal
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have created a drug that can lure stem cells to damaged tissue and improve treatment efficacy—a scientific first and major advance for the field of regenerative medicine. The discovery, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), could improve current stem cell therapies designed to treat such neurological disorders as spinal cord injury, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative disorders; and expand their use to new conditions, such as heart disease or arthritis.

Released: 19-Nov-2020 3:30 PM EST
Cato T. Laurencin Awarded the Materials Research Society's Highest Honor
Materials Research Society (MRS)

Laurencin will accept the honor during the 2020 Virtual MRS Spring/Fall Meeting, where at 4:00 pm (ET), Wednesday, December 2, he will present his award lecture, Regenerative Engineering: Materials and Convergence.

Newswise: Scientists use bacteria as micro-3D printers
Released: 10-Nov-2020 9:30 AM EST
Scientists use bacteria as micro-3D printers
Aalto University

A team at Aalto University has used bacteria to produce intricately designed three-dimensional objects made of nanocellulose. With their technique, the researchers are able to guide the growth of bacterial colonies through the use of strongly water repellent – or superhydrophobic – surfaces.

Newswise: Wound-Healing Biomaterials Activate the Immune System to Create Stronger Skin
Released: 9-Nov-2020 12:10 PM EST
Wound-Healing Biomaterials Activate the Immune System to Create Stronger Skin
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new hydrogel can trigger the body’s adaptive immune system, leading to improved tissue repair abilities

Newswise: Scientists use gene therapy and a novel light-sensing protein to restore vision in mice
20-Oct-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Scientists use gene therapy and a novel light-sensing protein to restore vision in mice
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

A newly developed light-sensing protein called the MCO1 opsin restores vision in blind mice when attached to retina bipolar cells using gene therapy. The National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, provided a Small Business Innovation Research grant to Nanoscope, LLC for development of MCO1. The company is planning a U.S. clinical trial for later this year.

Newswise: AAOS Advances Biologics Initiative with Innovative Dashboard
Released: 14-Oct-2020 12:55 PM EDT
AAOS Advances Biologics Initiative with Innovative Dashboard
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) continues to demonstrate its commitment to advancing the quality of musculoskeletal care in a fully transparent and scientific way. Debuting today as a new member benefit, the AAOS Biologics Dashboard is a dynamic online tool designed to help orthopaedic surgeons navigate the approval status of biologic-based interventions. The development of the AAOS Biologics Dashboard is just one of several efforts within the Academy’s Biologics Initiative that offers evidence-based guidance to the musculoskeletal health community. An additional effort is the revision of two biologics-related position statements, recently approved by the AAOS Board of Directors.

Newswise: NuShores Biosciences receives $2.8 million contract for intelligent manufacturing automation of bone regeneration technology
Released: 12-Oct-2020 11:10 AM EDT
NuShores Biosciences receives $2.8 million contract for intelligent manufacturing automation of bone regeneration technology
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

NuShores Biosciences, a spin-off company of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, has received a three-year, $2.8 million contract from the Medical Technology Enterprise Consortium, a biomedical technology consortium associated with the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command. The contract will enable NuShores to develop intelligent automated production of its NuCress™ bone void filler scaffold products using its factory-in-a-box concept. Key collaborators on the project include UA Little Rock and MiQ Partners of Cincinnati.

Newswise: Hackensack University Medical Center Urologists Offer Pioneering Clinical Trial to Study Nerve Recovery after Robotic Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer
Released: 9-Oct-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Hackensack University Medical Center Urologists Offer Pioneering Clinical Trial to Study Nerve Recovery after Robotic Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer
Hackensack Meridian Health

Department of Urology uses bioregenerative medicine to improve erectile function and continence after robotic radical prostatectomy

Newswise: Exosome treatment improves recovery from heart attacks in a preclinical study
Released: 29-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Exosome treatment improves recovery from heart attacks in a preclinical study
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Research in pigs shows that using the exosomes naturally produced from a mix of heart muscle, endothelial and smooth muscle cells — all derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells — yields regenerative benefits equivalent to the injected human induced pluripotent stem cell-cardiac cells.

Newswise:Video Embedded could-a-tiny-fish-hold-the-key-to-curing-blindness
VIDEO
Released: 25-Sep-2020 6:05 PM EDT
Could a tiny fish hold the key to curing blindness?
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Imagine this: A patient learns that they are losing their sight because an eye disease has damaged crucial cells in their retina. Then, under the care of their doctor, they simply grow some new retinal cells, restoring their vision. Although science hasn’t yet delivered this happy ending, researchers are working on it – with help from the humble zebrafish. When a zebrafish loses its retinal cells, it grows new ones. This observation has encouraged scientists to try hacking the zebrafish’s innate regenerative capacity to learn how to treat human disease. That is why among the National Eye Institute’s 1,200 active research projects, nearly 80 incorporate zebrafish.

Newswise: Scientists uncover a novel approach to treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Released: 15-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Scientists uncover a novel approach to treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys, Fondazione Santa Lucia IRCCS, and Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Rome have shown that pharmacological (drug) correction of the content of extracellular vesicles released within dystrophic muscles can restore their ability to regenerate muscle and prevent muscle scarring. The study, published in EMBO Reports, reveals a promising new therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable muscle-wasting condition.

Newswise: University of Miami Researchers Launch First U.S. Trial Testing Platelet-Rich Plasma as Peyronie’s Disease Treatment
Released: 31-Aug-2020 3:15 PM EDT
University of Miami Researchers Launch First U.S. Trial Testing Platelet-Rich Plasma as Peyronie’s Disease Treatment
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers are about to start recruiting for the first U.S. clinical trial looking at treating Peyronie’s disease, a painful and agonizing condition common in men, with platelet-rich plasma (PRP).

Newswise: Pigs Grow New Liver in Lymph Nodes, Study Shows
Released: 24-Aug-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Pigs Grow New Liver in Lymph Nodes, Study Shows
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Hepatocytes – the chief functional cells of the liver – are natural regenerators, and the lymph nodes serve as a nurturing place where they can multiply. Researchers demonstrated that large animals with ailing livers can grow a new organ in their lymph nodes from their own hepatocytes.

Released: 27-Jul-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Researchers Identify MicroRNA That Shows Promise for Hair Regrowth
North Carolina State University

Researchers have identified a microRNA (miRNA) that could promote hair regeneration. This miRNA – miR-218-5p – plays an important role in regulating the pathway involved in follicle regeneration, and could be a candidate for future drug development.

Newswise: Sanford Burnham Prebys receives CIRM award for COVID-19 research
Released: 21-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Sanford Burnham Prebys receives CIRM award for COVID-19 research
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute has received an award from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to advance promising drug candidates for COVID-19. The research team will test two existing drugs against “mini lungs in a dish” that have been infected with SARS-CoV-2.


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