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Article ID: 702496

Father's Nicotine Exposure May Cause Problems in Future Generations of His Children

Florida State University

A new Florida State University College of Medicine study in mice produced results that suggest nicotine exposure in men could lead to cognitive deficits in their children and grandchildren. Further studies will be required to know if the same outcomes seen in mice would apply to humans.

Released:
19-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
Embargo will expire:
22-Oct-2018 12:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
18-Oct-2018 4:05 PM EDT

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Article ID: 702445

For Preterm Infants, Skin-to-Skin Contact Affects Hormone Levels – And May Promote Parental Engagement

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

For premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), skin-to-skin contact with parents influences levels of hormones related to mother-infant attachment (oxytocin) and stress (cortisol) – and may increase parents' level of engagement with their infants, reports a study in Advances in Neonatal Care, official journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
18-Oct-2018 2:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 702348

Kids Health Outcomes Have More to do With Parents Level of Education Than Income

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A recent Rutgers study finds that parents educated beyond high school have healthier families, as they invest more in family health care which reduces the likelihood of adverse medical conditions.

Released:
18-Oct-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 702363

Think Your Child Has ADHD? Read This First.

University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

October is ADHD Awareness Month. As child diagnoses rise, UNLV psychologist Ronald T. Brown offers tips that parents should consider before calling their medical provider.

Released:
17-Oct-2018 1:45 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 702167

Early Study Results Suggest Fertility App as Effective as Modern Family Planning Methods

Georgetown University Medical Center

Early results from a first-of-its-kind study by researchers from the Institute for Reproductive Health at Georgetown University Medical Center suggests that typical use of a certain family planning app is as effective as other modern methods for avoiding an unplanned pregnancy.

Released:
15-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Oct-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701953

Half of Parents Say Their Preschooler Fears Doctor’s Visits

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Children’s anxiety may negatively impact parents’ interactions with providers during visits and even causes a small proportion of families to postpone or cancel appointments.

Released:
10-Oct-2018 8:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 702091

How Parenting Can Cause Antisocial Behaviors in Children

Michigan State University

Children who experience less parental warmth and more harshness in their home environments may be more aggressive and lack empathy and a moral compass, according to a study by researchers at Michigan State University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Michigan. The study is published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Released:
11-Oct-2018 3:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 700983

Exposure of Mothers to Terror Attacks during Pregnancy Increases the Risk of Schizophrenia in Their Children

University of Haifa

The children of mothers exposed to terror attacks during pregnancy are 2.5 times more likely to develop schizophrenia than mothers not to exposed to terror during pregnancy. This was the finding of a comprehensive study undertaken at the University of Haifa.

Released:
8-Oct-2018 8:05 AM EDT

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