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How meditation can help you make fewer mistakes

Michigan State University

New research from Michigan State University tested how open monitoring meditation – or, meditation that focuses awareness on feelings, thoughts or sensations as they unfold in one's mind and body – altered brain activity in a way that suggests increased error recognition.

Channels: All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Cognition and Learning, Mental Health, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry, Mindfulness,

Released:
11-Nov-2019 1:40 PM EST
Research Tip Sheet

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Mind-body therapies alleviate pain in people prescribed opioids

Mind-body therapies alleviate pain in people prescribed opioids

University of Utah

A new study published Nov. 4, 2019, in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine details the first comprehensive look across the scientific literature at the role of mind-body therapies in addressing opioid-treated pain. The researchers found that certain mind-body therapies can reduce pain, as well as reduce opioid use, among patients treated with prescription opioids.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Healthcare, Mindfulness, Neuro, Pain, Substance Abuse, JAMA,

Released:
5-Nov-2019 1:10 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Three tips for better sleep

Houston Methodist

More than one-third of Americans get less than seven hours of sleep each night, putting them at risk for serious, chronic health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity. The real victim of a lack of sleep, however, is the brain.

Channels: All Journal News, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Mental Health, Mindfulness, Neuro, Nutrition, Obesity, Sleep,

Released:
29-Oct-2019 2:15 PM EDT
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    28-Oct-2019 11:00 AM EDT

In Wisconsin, 3 in 5 people with Down syndrome diagnosed with dementia by age 55

University of Wisconsin-Madison

A new study of 3,000 people in Wisconsin aged 21 and older with Down syndrome, published today [Monday, Oct. 28, 2019] in JAMA Neurology by researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, shows that by age 55, three in five will be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or a similar neurodegenerative condition. Meanwhile, people without Down syndrome are rarely diagnosed with dementia before age 65.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Clinical Trials, Genetics, Mindfulness, Neuro, JAMA,

Released:
25-Oct-2019 4:30 PM EDT
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Mindfulness meditation enhances positive effects of psilocybin

University of Zurich

Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the clinical application of classic psychedelics in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders.

Channels: All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Mental Health, Mindfulness, Psychology and Psychiatry, Scientific Reports,

Released:
24-Oct-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Dementia patients’ adult kids diagnosed earlier than their parents

Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that people with dementia – whose parents also had dementia – develop symptoms an average of six years earlier than their parents.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Genetics, Mindfulness, Seniors, Family and Parenting, JAMA, Grant Funded News,

Released:
22-Oct-2019 4:40 PM EDT
Research Results
Newswise: Too many Americans admit to driving while drowsy

Too many Americans admit to driving while drowsy

American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

New survey results from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine highlight the prevalence of drowsy driving. To help drivers stay awake at the wheel, the AASM offers tips for National Drowsy Driving Prevention Week, Nov. 3-10.

Channels: All Journal News, Automotive, Mindfulness, Patient Safety, Public Health, Sleep, Travel and Transportation,

Released:
22-Oct-2019 7:05 AM EDT
Research Results
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Study suggests a new way to think about the brain’s link to postpartum depression

Ohio State University

Chronic stress during pregnancy triggers an immune response in the brain that has potential to alter brain functions in ways that could contribute to postpartum depression, new research in animals suggests.

Channels: All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Mental Health, Mindfulness, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry, Women's Health, Scientific Meetings, Medical Meetings,

Released:
21-Oct-2019 2:20 PM EDT
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