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110 of 519

Article ID: 709613

Shield Diagnostics announces launch of Target-NG test for antibiotic susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Shield Diagnostics

Shield Diagnostics, an Andreessen Horowitz-backed clinical laboratory tackling antibiotic resistance by bringing precision medicine to infectious disease, announced the launch of Target-NG, a rapid molecular test for antibiotic susceptibility in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Released:
14-Mar-2019 4:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 709494

Advanced Biological Laboratories, Mayo Clinic Laboratories collaborate on test development to help patients with cytomegalovirus infection

Mayo Clinic

Advanced Biological Laboratories (ABL), S.A., a Luxembourg-based diagnostics company and leader in virology genotyping, and Mayo Clinic Laboratories have announced a collaboration. The two organizations are working together to develop a clinical test that will detect mutations associated with antiviral resistance in human cytomegalovirus.

Released:
12-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Mar-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 709293

Scientists Discover Key Enzyme in Breast Cancer Proliferation, Treatment Resistance

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

UNC School of Medicine scientists uncovered a possible reason why some breast cancers are so aggressive and difficult to treat: an enzyme called USP21 promotes proliferation of basal-like breast cancer and is upregulated in a significant percentage of patient tumors. It could become a drug target.

Released:
7-Mar-2019 2:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 709325

Study: Life-saving antibiotic receives new use guidelines from researchers around world

University at Buffalo

An international panel of the foremost researchers on infectious disease and antimicrobials has formed new guidelines on the use of polymyxins, a class of antibiotics employed as a last resort to treat deadly, drug-resistant bacteria.

Released:
8-Mar-2019 10:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 709242

Tufts University, Tufts Medical Center launch center for study of antimicrobial resistance

Tufts University

Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center unite decades of experience and expertise in infectious disease research and clinical care with the Tufts Center for Integrated Management of Antimicrobial Resistance to more effectively address the rise and spread of multi-drug resistant organisms.

Released:
7-Mar-2019 5:20 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Mar-2019 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 709073

Researchers Discover a New Mechanism Used by Bacteria to Evade Antibiotics

University of California San Diego

Antibiotics survival mechanism: UC San Diego researchers have discovered an unexpected mechanism that allows bacteria to defend themselves against antibiotics, a surprise finding that could lead to retooled drugs to treat infectious diseases.

Released:
5-Mar-2019 8:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Mar-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 709100

New Small Molecule Inhibitors Show Potential for Treatment of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Cancers

Wistar Institute

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have created a drug candidate for cancers associated with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis.

Released:
5-Mar-2019 10:40 AM EST
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Article ID: 709212

A “Post-Antibiotic World?”

University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering

The products of wastewater treatment have been found to contain trace amounts of antibiotic resistant DNA. These products are often reintroduced to the environment and water supply, potentially resulting in the spread of antibiotic resistance.

Released:
6-Mar-2019 1:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Mar-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 709063

Infection Control Technique May Reduce Dangerous Infections in Patients With Catheters, Drains

Rush University Medical Center

Each year, approximately 5 million patients in the United States receive treatment that includes the insertion of a medical device such as a catheter, which puts them at increased risk of potentially life-threatening infection. Researchers have found a strategy that greatly reduced both overall infection and infection with antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a group of these patients. The results of their study were published today in the online issue of The Lancet.

Released:
4-Mar-2019 4:20 PM EST

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