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Embargo will expire:
24-Feb-2020 8:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
21-Feb-2020 11:05 AM EST

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Newswise: Researchers explore role of antibiotic resistance in pandemic risk

Researchers explore role of antibiotic resistance in pandemic risk

Johns Hopkins University

Researchers investigating the drug prescription response to a “superbug” enzyme that renders bacteria resistant to antibiotics are available to discuss why such resistance is posing a growing risk during pandemics such as the current coronavirus.

Channels: All Journal News, Drug Resistance, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, Public Health, Influenza, China News, Southeast Asia News,

Released:
13-Feb-2020 1:35 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Antibiotics discovered that kill bacteria in a new way: McMaster
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Feb-2020 1:00 PM EST

Antibiotics discovered that kill bacteria in a new way: McMaster

McMaster University

A new group of antibiotics with a unique approach to attacking bacteria has been discovered, making it a promising clinical candidate in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. The newly-found corbomycin and the lesser-known complestatin have a never-before-seen way to kill bacteria, which is achieved by blocking the function of the bacterial cell wall. The discovery comes from a family of antibiotics called glycopeptides that are produced by soil bacteria.

Channels: All Journal News, Drug Resistance, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, Nature (journal),

Released:
10-Feb-2020 3:40 PM EST
Feature
Research Results
Newswise: Immune responses to tuberculosis mapped across 3 species

Immune responses to tuberculosis mapped across 3 species

Washington University in St. Louis

A new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis offers a genetic road map detailing the similarities and differences in immune responses to TB across three species — mice, macaques and humans. According to the researchers, the insight into the immune pathways that are activated in diverse models of TB infection will serve as a valuable tool for scientists studying and working to eradicate the disease.

Channels: All Journal News, Drug Resistance, Immunology, Public Health, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Genetics, Infectious Diseases,

Released:
29-Jan-2020 6:20 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Discovery reveals antibiotic-resistant strep throat may be too close for comfort
  • Embargo expired:
    29-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST

Discovery reveals antibiotic-resistant strep throat may be too close for comfort

Houston Methodist

Infectious disease scientists identified strains of group A streptococcus that are less susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, a sign that the germ causing strep throat and flesh-eating disease may be moving closer to resistance to penicillin and other related antibiotics known as beta-lactams.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Drug Resistance, Infectious Diseases, Microbiome, Public Health, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
27-Jan-2020 11:05 AM EST
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    29-Jan-2020 10:00 AM EST

Does Lung Damage Speed Pancreatic Cancer?

Thomas Jefferson University

High levels of CO2 in the body, due to chronic respiratory disorders, may exacerbate pancreatic cancer, making it more aggressive and resistant to therapy.

Channels: All Journal News, Asthma, Cancer, Drug Resistance, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Smoking,

Released:
28-Jan-2020 10:25 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections
  • Embargo expired:
    29-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST

Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed color-changing bandages that can sense drug-resistant and drug-sensitive bacteria in wounds and treat them accordingly.

Channels: All Journal News, Drug Resistance, Healthcare, Patient Safety,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 10:00 AM EST
Research Results
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1 in 4 kids who get antibiotics in children’s hospitals are prescribed the drugs incorrectly

Washington University in St. Louis

New research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that 1 in 4 of the children given antibiotics in U.S. children's hospitals are prescribed the drugs inappropriately. The overuse of antibiotics poses an increasing threat to children who develop — or already have — drug-resistant infections.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Drug Resistance, Healthcare,

Released:
28-Jan-2020 7:05 PM EST
Research Results


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