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Article ID: 692732

Remnants of Antibiotics Persist in Treated Farm Waste, Research Finds

University at Buffalo

Each year, farmers in the U.S. purchase tens of millions of pounds of antibiotics approved for use in livestock. When the animals’ manure is reused as fertilizer or bedding, traces of the medicines leach into the environment. New research holds troublesome insights with regard to the scope of this problem.

Released:
12-Apr-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692456

Survival Strategy: How One Enzyme Helps Bacteria Recover From Exposure to Antibiotics

University of Notre Dame

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame focused on an enzyme in gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a pathogen that causes pneumonia and sepsis.

Released:
9-Apr-2018 3:10 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692366

A New Class of Antibiotics to Combat Drug Resistance

University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Nosopharm report on the discovery of a new class of antibiotics that may be effective at treating drug-resistant infections.

Released:
6-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692242

How Did Gonorrhea Become a Drug-Resistant Superbug?

University of North Carolina Health Care System

UNC School of Medicine researchers have identified mutations to the bacterium Neisseria gonnorrhoeae that enable resistance to ceftriaxone that could lead to the global spread of ceftriaxone-resistant “superbug” strains.

Released:
4-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692244

Faster Diagnostics, Personalized Antibiotics Needed to Halt Superbugs

Cornell University

Released:
4-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692114

Mathematical Modeling Offers New Way to Understand Variable Responses to Targeted Therapy

Moffitt Cancer Center

Cancer therapies that target a specific protein have improved outcomes for patients. However, many patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies and their cancer comes back. It is believed that differences among tumor cells, or heterogeneity, may contribute to this drug resistance. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are using a unique approach by combining typical cell culture studies with mathematical modeling to determine how heterogeneity within a tumor and the surrounding tumor environment affect responses to targeted drug therapies.

Released:
3-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692067

NNR Technique Plays Vital Role in Searching for Next Antibiotic

Iowa State University

Vincenzo Venditti, an assistant professor of chemistry at Iowa State University, is searching for a new kind of antibiotic in the fight against antimicrobial-resistant superbugs.

Released:
2-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    2-Apr-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 691962

Infants Exposed to Antacids, Antibiotics at Increased Risk for Childhood Allergies

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

Exposing infants to antacids or antibiotics in their first six months of life could increase their risk of developing allergies in childhood.

Released:
29-Mar-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    28-Mar-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 691731

A Chink in Bacteria’s Armor

Harvard Medical School

• Scientists untangle the structure of a recently discovered bacterial wall-building protein, found in nearly all bacteria • The discovery unveils potential weak spots in the protein’s molecular make-up • Findings can pave the way to next-generation broad-spectrum drugs that disrupt the protein’s function and disarm harmful bacteria

Released:
26-Mar-2018 3:35 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691730

Could a Paper Device Diagnose Infectious Disease?

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Imagine a small paper device that can rapidly reveal from a drop of blood whether an infection is bacterial or viral. The device could help reduce the overuse of antibiotics – which kill bacteria, not viruses. Misuse of antibiotics has led to antimicrobial resistance, a growing global public health issue.

Released:
28-Mar-2018 12:05 AM EDT
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