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Sleep, Insomnia, Sensory Processing, Sensory Processing Disorders, Circadian Cycles, Circadian Disruption, Sleep Disorder, Evolution

Tiny Cavefish May Help Humans Evolve to Require Very Little Sleep

We all do it; we all need it – humans and animals alike. Neuroscientists have been studying Mexican cavefish to provide insight into the evolutionary mechanisms regulating sleep loss and the relationship between sensory processing and sleep.

Medicine

Science

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Sleep, Neuron, Wake, wakefullness, Circadian, Narcolepsy, Caffeine, Adenosine, neuronal circuit, Brain

BIDMC Scientists Survey the State of Sleep Science

Sleep remains an enduring biological mystery with major clinical relevance, according to a review by clinician-researcher Thomas Scammell, MD, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and colleagues. In recent decades, new technologies have allowed neuroscientists to identify multiple brain circuits that govern the sleep/wake cycle, as well as the factors that can influence it, such as caffeine and light. But the brain’s complexity is still a stumbling block in understanding this ubiquitous and necessary animal behavior, the researchers wrote. Their review appeared today in the journal Neuron.

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Seizures Tracked with Apple Watch App Linked to Stress, Missed Sleep

New research using an Apple Watch app to track seizures in people with epilepsy finds triggers are often stress and missed sleep, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017.

Medicine

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Health, Medicine, Grant Funding

Philly’s Opportunity to Address Health Disparities Through Research Funding

R01, K, R03, T32 – navigating the world of NIH grants, especially in uncertain financial funding times, can be confusing. Last month, Gary H. Gibbons, MD, director of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health, delivered a keynote address to explain existing opportunities, and outlined the institute’s vision for future funding of research.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Feb-2017 4:00 PM EST

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Fragile X Syndrome, Steven Tyler's Janie's Fund Wins Big, Untreated Water Making Our Kids Sick, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Medicine

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Insomnia Medication, Insomnia Meds, Insomnia, Physician Education, Pharmacology, Prescribing Patterns, Clinical Decision Making, Treatment Choices, Habits, Decision Influences

Mental Shortcuts

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Clinical decision-making and treatment choice is a complex cognitive process influenced by multiple variables.

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Geospatial Indicators on Prevention, Cocaine and Unsafe Sex, LASER ART, and More in the AIDS and HIV News Source

The latest research, features, and experts on HIV and AIDS.

Medicine

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Premature Birth, NICU, Preemie Care

NICU Study Highlights Need to Reduce Loud Noises, Boost Beneficial Sounds

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that preemies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may be exposed to noise levels higher than those deemed safe by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Conversely, the researchers also found that some preemies may not get enough exposure to beneficial sounds, such as language and music, that can improve early development.

Medicine

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Sleep, Seniors, Insomnia, Sleep Medicine, Sleep Apnea

Older Adults Need as Much Sleep as College Students

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Medicine

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Sleep, Sleep Study, Immune Molecules, Regulator of Sleep, Universal Immune Mechanism, inflammasome NLRP3, inflammasome, Brain Health, Interleukin 1 Beta, NLRP3

Study Points to a Universal Immune Mechanism as a Regulator of Sleep

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Sleep—one of the most basic, yet most mystifying processes of the human body—has confounded physicians, scientists and evolutionary biologists for centuries.

Medicine

Science

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Richard Huganir, Paul Worley, Sleep, mice, Brain Cells, homer1a , Memory, homeostatic scaling

Sleep Deprivation Handicaps the Brain's Ability to Form New Memories, Study in Mice Shows

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Studying mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins have fortified evidence that a key purpose of sleep is to recalibrate the brain cells responsible for learning and memory so the animals can "solidify" lessons learned and use them when they awaken -- in the case of nocturnal mice, the next evening.

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UW Sleep Research High-Resolution Images Show How the Brain Resets During Sleep

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Striking electron microscope pictures from inside the brains of mice suggest what happens in our own brain every day: Our synapses – the junctions between nerve cells - grow strong and large during the stimulation of daytime, then shrink by nearly 20 percent while we sleep, creating room for more growth and learning the next day.

Medicine

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clinical massage, guided imagery, Complementary Medicine, progressive care, pain, Anxiety, Insomnia, Nursing, Massage, Beaumont Hospital Royal Oak, Beaumont Health, Integrative Medicine

Clinical Massage, Guided Imagery Show Promise as Tools to Relieve Pain, Anxiety and Insomnia for Hospitalized Patients

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Researchers with Beaumont Health System found that patients’ self-reported pain and anxiety scores improved immediately after a clinical massage, while other patients who listened to a guided-imagery recording found the intervention to be very helpful, reporting improvements in pain, anxiety and insomnia.

Medicine

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Levo System, Otoharmonics, Tinnitus, hearing disorders, Ear And Hearing, Ringing In The Ears, Veterans

New Technology Alleviates Tinnitus by Retraining the Brain to Ignore Ringing in the Ears

Tinnitus -- "ringing in the ears" -- affects an estimated 50 million Americans and is the leading service-related disability among U.S. veterans. Until recently, very little could be done for sufferers, but now a new, FDA-approved technology is successfully treating it. The Levo System mimics the buzzing, hissing, whistling or clicking sounds that many tinnitus sufferers describe and "trains" the brain to ignore them, thereby alleviating the condition entirely. To do this, patients wear earbuds at night while sleeping, when the brain is most responsive to sensory input.

Medicine

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OSA, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (Osa), CPAP, Continuous positive airway pressure, Mandibular Advancement Device, OSA and cardiovascular disease

Oral Devices Reduce Sleep Apnea but May Not Affect Heart Disease Risk Factors

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In patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), oral appliances that treat the condition by moving the lower jaw forward appear to improve sleep but not reduce key risk factors for developing heart and other cardiovascular disease, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Prof. Tamar Shochat, University Of Haifa, Sleep, Creativity, Neta Ram-Vlasov

Creative People Sleep More, Later, and Less Well

The study compared art students and social science students. The finding: art student sleep more hours, but reported more sleep disturbance and daytime dysfunction

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New Study Shows Anxiety Impairing Quality of Life for Postmenopausal Women

Anxiety associated with hot flashes, sleep disruption, and muscle and joint complaints

Medicine

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Tonsillectomy, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, AHRQ, Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center, Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, Siva Chinnadurai

Vanderbilt Studies Find Tonsillectomies Offer Only Modest Benefits

Removing tonsils modestly reduced throat infections in the short term in children with moderate obstructive sleep-disordered breathing or recurrent throat infections, according to a systematic review conducted by the Vanderbilt Evidence-based Practice Center for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Medicine

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Sleep, Sleep Apnea, Sleep Deprivation, sleep deprived, Football, Athletes, Performance, concussion, Adolescent

Sleep Apnea Can Influence Football Players' Performance, Concussion Recovery

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