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4 Timely Facts About Our Biological Clocks

After you roll your clocks back by an hour this Sunday, you may feel tired. That's because our bodies—more specifically, our circadian rhythms—need a little time to adjust. These daily cycles are run by a network of tiny, coordinated biological clocks. NIH's Mike Sesma tracks circadian rhythm research being conducted in labs across the country, and he shares a few timely details about our internal clocks.

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Vanderbilt Sleep Expert Says Take a Walk in the Sun to Ease Time Change Woes

Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 2. As clocks turn back one hour, we gain an hour of sleep but often still feel groggy and sluggish. Vanderbilt Sleep Disorders Center specialist Kelly Brown, M.D., says this change in sleep schedule is exacerbated by our tendency to alter our sleep patterns on the weekends anyway.

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Innovative Study Utilizing Video Games Shows Sleep Apnea May Affect Memory of Everyday Events

Sleep apnea may affect your ability to form new spatial memories, such as remembering where you parked your car, new research led by NYU Langone Medical Center sleep specialists suggests. The study, published online Oct. 29 in Journal of Neuroscience, demonstrates through the playing of a specific video game that disruption of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as a consequence of sleep apnea impairs spatial memory in humans even when other sleep stages are intact.

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From Age 8 to 80, Ohio State Expert Reveals the Price We Pay for Not Sleeping

Most Americans who spend part of the year on daylight saving time look forward to the extra hour of sleep when it’s time to “fall back” to standard time. We are a nation of sleep-deprived people, and experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center say all ages suffer in various, unhealthy ways.

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Resetting the Circadian Clock: Shift Workers Might Want to Skip High-Iron Foods at Night

Workers punching in for the graveyard shift may be better off not eating high-iron foods at night so they don’t disrupt the circadian clock in their livers.

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Memory Decline Among Menopausal Women Could Be Next Research Frontier for Hypnotic Relaxation Therapy

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Memory decline — a frequent complaint of menopausal women — potentially could be lessened by hypnotic relaxation therapy, say Baylor University researchers, who already have done studies showing that such therapy eases hot flashes, improves sleep and reduces stress in menopausal women.

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Don’t Lose Sleep Over Daylight Savings - Rest Easy with Good Sleep Hygiene

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When the clocks “fall back” this year on Nov. 2, don’t let gaining an extra hour rob you of needed sleep. There’s plenty you can do now to establish healthy sleep habits and make it easier to reset your internal clock.

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Insomnia Among Older Adults May Be Tied to Sleep Quality, Not Duration

Reports of insomnia are common among the elderly, but a new study finds that sleep problems may stem from the quality of rest and other health concerns more than the overall amount of sleep that patients get.

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Penn Medicine Study Finds Tongue Fat and Size May Predict Sleep Apnea in Obese Adults

Obesity is a risk factor for many health problems, but a new Penn Medicine study published this month in the journal Sleep suggests having a larger tongue with increased levels of fat may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in obese adults.

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At Dusk & Dawn: Scientists Pinpoint Biological Clock’s Synchronicity

Scientists have uncovered how pacemaker neurons are synchronized at dusk and dawn in order to maintain the proper functioning of their biological clocks. Their findings enhance our understanding of how sleep-wake cycles are regulated and offer promise for addressing related afflictions.

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