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Parents Struggle with When to Keep Kids Home Sick From School; Experts on Peanut Allergies Weigh In on New Guidelines; A Better Way to Test for Jaundice, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Medicine

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Plastic Surgery, Reconstructive Surgery, Sleep Apnea, Pharyngeal Surgery, Jaw Surgery

Sex, Race and Financial Factors Affect Rates of Jaw Surgery for Sleep Apnea

Jaw advancement surgery is one of the most effective surgical treatments for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)—but it's less likely to be performed in men, racial/ethnic minorities, lower-income groups, and patients with Medicare coverage, reports a study in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery—Global Open®, the official open-access medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Sleep, sleep tips, sleep associations, nightwakings

How Can I Help My Child to Fall Asleep and Stay Asleep?

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Overall, studies indicate that 15 to 20 percent of one to three year olds continue to have nightwakings. According to Stephanie Zandieh, M.D., Director, Pediatric Sleep Disorders and Apnea Center, The Valley Hospital, “Inappropriate sleep associations are the primary cause of frequent nightwakings. Sleep associations are those conditions that are habitually present at the time of sleep onset and in the presence of which the infant or child has learned to fall asleep. These same conditions are then required in order for the infant or child to fall back to sleep following periodic normal nighttime arousals.”

Medicine

Science

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Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, Apnea, Sleep, Respiration, Breathing, Neuroscience, Nervous System

TSRI Study: Protein Monitors Lung Volume and Regulates Breathing

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The researchers said this study might help shed light on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in human babies, which is thought to be associated with dysfunctional airway sensory neurons.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Sleep, Discrimination, MIDUS, Race, Disparities, Psychosocial, Psychosomatic Medicine, American Psychosomatic Society

Losing Sleep Over Discrimination? 'Everyday Discrimination' May Contribute to Sleep Problems

People who perceive more discrimination in daily life have higher rates of sleep problems, based on both subjective and objective measures, reports a study in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Medicine

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Brain Injury, better sleep

Recovery From Brain Injury and Better Sleep Go Hand in Hand

After a traumatic brain injury (TBI), people also experience major sleep problems, including changes in their sleep-wake cycle. A new study shows that recovering from these two conditions occurs in parallel. The study is published in the December 21, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

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SIDS, Sids Prevention, SIDS risk factors, Pediatric, American Academcy of Pediatric, safe sleep, Infant, baby, ad campaign, ad media, Advertisement, Advertising education

Advertisers Depict Unsafe Sleeping Environments for Infants, Study Shows

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Contrary to advertisements, bumper pads and stuffed animals are not part of a safe sleep environment for infants.

Medicine

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David Linden, Rachel Salas, Michelle Carlstrom, Holiday, Holidays, Stress, Health, Sleep, Volunteer, Volunteering, Relationships

Keeping the Holidays Healthy

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The holidays are a time for family, fun and happiness. They are usually spent with the ones we love reflecting on the past year and feeling grateful. However, even with all the joy, the holidays can cause quite a large amount of stress. Whether it be trying to forgive someone for a mishap, trying not to let your worries impact your sleep, dealing with the dark and gloomy days, or merely learning the joys of giving, our experts are here with tips on how to make this holiday season a little brighter.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Sleep, children and sleep, sleep expert, holidays and sleep, Sleep Disorders, pediatric sleep

Holiday Sleep Tips for Kids Help Parents Keep the Season Bright

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The holidays can pose great challenges for parents who must juggle seasonal excitement and overtired kids. Saint Joseph’s University sleep expert and Professor of Psychology Jodi A. Mindell, Ph.D., offers the following suggestions for parents to help kids navigate high spirits and the need for rest.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Online Insomnia Program Can Improve Sleep for Many, Study Finds

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An online program designed to help people overcome insomnia significantly improves both the amount and quality of sleep, a new study has found.  The study is the first to look closely at the effects of the Sleep Healthy Using the Internet (SHUTi) program on people with health conditions that could be affecting their sleep.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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How Kids' Brains Respond to a Late Night Up

Sleep deprivation affects children's brains differently than adults', according to a new study

Science

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Protein and Salt Drive Post-Meal Sleepiness

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Sleepiness after a large meal is something we all experience, and new research with fruit flies suggests higher protein and salt content in our food, as well as the volume consumed, can lead to longer naps.

Medicine

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Sleep Apnea, NJ Transit , Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

Sleep Medicine Specialist Urges: Don’t Ignore The Dangers of Sleep Apnea

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The recent catastrophic NJ Transit train accident in Hoboken highlights one of the perils of undiagnosed sleep apnea – the threat to transportation safety. As in several other recent calamitous accidents, the engineer fell asleep at the wheel due to a medical condition that causes sleepiness, and the presence of which he was not aware. When an individual operates a vehicle of public transportation, whether it be a train, a bus or a plane, many lives are in their hands. Anytime the operator of one of these modes of transportation becomes drowsy, or worse, falls asleep at the controls, many lives are immediately placed in jeopardy. This is why these safety-critical personnel should be screened and monitored for their fitness for their work, including identifying the presence of sleep disorders. In fact, the Federal Railroad Administration is expected to issue a safety advisory this week stressing the importance of sleep apnea screening and treatment.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Colic, SIDS, Infant Apnea

Are SIDS and Colic Related? Researchers Propose New Theory

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Lead researcher James McKenna, Professor of Anthropology at the University of Notre Dame, and his colleagues suggest that the origin of both colic and SIDS may be related to the gradual emergence of an infant’s ability to voluntarily control the release of air through the vocal track.

Medicine

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SIDS, Sids Prevention, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, safe sleep, co-sleeping, Infant sleeping

The Medical Minute: Keeping Your Baby Safe While Sleeping

Allowing an infant to sleep in your bed or putting blankets or stuffed animals in their crib could be tragic mistakes, increasing their child’s risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

Medicine

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Physiology, Immune System, Sleep, T Cells

Study Explores How Immune System Functions During Sleep

Researchers have found new insights into sleep’s importance to overall health: it may give the immune system a chance to regroup at a time when the relative risk of infection is low. As the foundation of the human body’s immune system, large quantities of T cells—a type of white blood cell—are present in the bloodstream and are ready to attack viruses and other pathogens that invade the body. The research team observed that healthy volunteers had greatly reduced numbers of certain T cell subsets within three hours of falling asleep. While it’s unclear where the T cells go during sleep, the researchers have some guesses to where and why they migrate.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Dreams, Violence, Sex, Violent media

​Consuming Violent Media Linked to 13x Surge in Violent Dreams

The violent and sexual media you consume during the day may infiltrate your dreams at night, new research suggests. People who reported consuming violent media within 90 minutes of bedtime were 13 times more likely to have a violent dream that night.

Medicine

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SIDS, Infant sleeping, Sids Prevention

Should Infants Sleep in Their Parents Bedrooms?

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Recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a recommendation that infants sleep in their parents’ room, close to the parents’ bed — but on a separate surface designed for infants — for at least 6 months, and preferably up to 1 year of age. Such a sleeping arrangement decreases the risk of SIDS by as much as 50 percent, according to the AAP.

Medicine

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Daylight Saving Time, Time Change, Sleep

The Medical Minute: Why Some Adapt to Time Changes Easier Than Others

Whether you barely noticed the time change or are still feeling the effects of the end of Daylight Saving Time, you probably have your genes to blame.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Daylight Saving Time, sleep expert

NewYork-Presbyterian Sleep Expert Available for Interview on Daylight Saving Time Sleep Cycles

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