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Maya Healers’ Conception of Cancer May Help Bridge Gap in Multicultural Settings Care

Understanding and integrating patients’ cultural beliefs into cancer treatment plans may help improve their acceptance of and adherence to treatment in multicultural settings. Researchers examined traditional Maya healers’ understanding of cancer and published their findings online today in the Journal of Global Oncology.

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Experts Needed: Scientists Offer New Evidence of a "Ninth Planet" in Our System

Astronomers at Cal Tech have announced today that they have found new evidence of a giant icy planet in our solar system which is far beyond the orbit of Pluto. They are calling it "Planet Nine." Their study, published in the Astronomical Journal, describes the planet as about five to 10 times as massive as the Earth. Newswise puts out a call for experts to answer media questions regarding this possible ninth planet of our solar system.

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More Twins Being Born in the U.S. Than Ever Before

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According to a newly released report by the CDC, the birth of twins reached an all-time record number in 2014. 2014 saw 33.9 sets of twins per 1,000 births, versus 33.7 in 2013. It is believed that the increase is due to the increase in birth rates for older women. Scientist believe older women are actually more likely to have twins. They are also more likely to use IVF fertilization to conceive.

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Loss of Large Tree-Dwelling Animals Could Accelerate Climate Change

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A study published in the journal Science Advances explains how the decline in animal populations in tropical forests may play a role in accelerating climate change.

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The Leonard C. Goodman Institute for Investigative Reporting Is Now Accepting Submissions

The deadline for this round of proposals is January 15, 2016. Candidates will be notified of decisions by the end of February 2016. The Institute pays a competitive rate--and covers expenses--for investigative reporting that advances social and economic justice. All stories are published in In These Times magazine and on InTheseTimes.com.

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Modern Birds Linked to a Common Ancestor that Rose Out of South America 90 Million Years Ago

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A new study led by the American Museum of Natural History links modern birds to a "feathered father" that lived in South America some 90 million years ago.

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Top Stories 11 Dec 2015; New Forensic Science Breakthroughs, Breast Cancer Treatment Difference by Age, Racial Disparities in Dialysis, and More...

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Stonehenge Originated in Wales

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A study published in the journal Antiquity explains how the bluestones that make up the famous neolithic monument in Salisbury Plain in England, were dug out at least 500 years before in Wales. Stonehenge may have stood in Wales hundreds of years before it was dismantled and transported.

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Scientists Create Carbon Substance That is Harder Than Diamond

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Researchers at North Carolina State University say they have developed a technique for creating a substance they are calling Q-carbon, which represents a third phase, or distinct form, of carbon alongside graphite and diamond.

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Hundreds of Enormous Footprints Left by Dinosaurs Found Along a Lagoon in Scotland

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UK researchers stumbled across several hundred dinosaur footprints in a coastal lagoon on the Isle of Skye, which they dated to the Middle Jurassic, 170 million years ago. The researchers, which include Stephen Brusatte from the University of Edinburgh, UK and his colleague Tom Challands, surmise that the footprints were left by sauropods, primitive cousins of the more famous Brontosaurus and Diplodocus. The largest of the footprints measure around 70 centimetres across, larger than those that would have been left by T. Rex. This find is the largest dinosaur site found in Scotland to date. The researchers report their findings in the Scottish Journal of Geology.

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Japanese Scientists Devised a Touchable Hologram

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Dr. Yoichi Ochi of Tsukuba University and his team have come up with an unique way to display 3D holograms that are touchable using a technology called femtosecond laser technology. The technology uses pulses that can be manipulated with human touch. Combined with mirrors and cameras, the rapid, high-intensity lasers direct tiny light points called voxels in certain directions to produce images of up to 200,000 dots per second of resolution.

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Study Of Reptile Fossil Reveals How Snakes May Have Lost Their Limbs

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Findings, recently published in the journal Science Advances, show that snakes did not lose their limbs in order to live in the sea, as has been previously suggested. The research led by scientists at the University of Edinburgh’s School of GeoSciences involves the analysis of a 90-year old reptilian fossil of Dinilysia patagonica, a 2-meter long reptile. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the bony inner ear of Dinilysia patagonica reveals how this ancestor to modern snakes became adept at burrowing.

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Male and Female Brains Are Basically the Same

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According to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, brains can't really fit into the categories of "male" or "female" -- their distinguishing features actually vary across a spectrum. Researchers led by University of Tel-Aviv studied brain scans of some 1,400 individuals and could not find a single pattern that distinguishes between a male brain and a female brain.

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Computer Model Helps Explain Bizarre Prehistoric Sea Creature

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Using a computer model, scientists were able to show that Tribrachidium, a disc shaped seas creature that lived about 555-million-years ago, fed by collecting particles suspended in water. This is called suspension feeding and it had not previously been documented in organisms from this period of time.

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Sugar Free Drinks Cause Serious Damage to Teeth, Too

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Research out of Melbourne University’s Oral Health Cooperative Research Centre tested a wide rage of sugar-free soft drinks and found that many of them can be just as harmful to teeth as their sugared counterparts due to acidic additives.

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UN: 2015 on Track to Be Hottest Year on Record

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The World Meteorological Organization, the weather agency of the United Nations announced on Wednesday that 2015 is the hottest year on record, breaching the symbolic and significant milestone of 1 degree Celsius above the pre-industrial era. The report comes the week before world leaders assemble in Paris to try to negotiate an agreement to fight climate change. Records go back to 1880.

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Breastfeeding May Reduce Mom's Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A study recently published online on November 23rd in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that that those who breastfed were a great deal less likely -- up to 50 percent less -- to develop diabetes 2 in subsequent years than those who did not breast feed.

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Ancient DNA Reveals How Farming Changed Our Height, Digestion, Immunity and Skin Color

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A study published in the journal, Nature, adds to growing evidence that the people of Europe’s DNA underwent widespread changes, altering their height, digestion, immune system and skin color with the spread of agriculture.

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A Cybernetic Rose with Self-Growing Circuits

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Scientist led by Linköping University in Sweden have created cyborg roses with tiny electronic circuits threaded through their vascular systems.

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FDA Approves Genetically Modified Salmon For Human Consumption

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On Thursday, the Food and Drug Administration announced that it has approved the first genetically modified food animal, the genetically engineered salmon. According to the FDA press release, "the AquAdvantage Salmon is as safe to eat as any non-genetically engineered (GE) Atlantic salmon, and also as nutritious." Experts needed.