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Article ID: 692983

Why Don’t Kids Use Their Asthma Medicines? Children, Caregivers and Clinicians Disagree on the Answer

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a new analysis of interviews conducted with children who have asthma, their caregivers and their clinicians, Johns Hopkins researchers found that there was significant lack of agreement about why the kids miss their needed daily anti-inflammatory medication.

Released:
18-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 692946

New Clues Point to Relief for Chronic Itching

Washington University in St. Louis

Studying mice, researchers have found that a drug called nalfurafine hydrochloride (Remitch) can deliver itch relief by targeting particular opioid receptors on neurons in the spinal cord. The new study suggests that the drug may be effective against many types of chronic itching that don’t respond to conventional drugs such as antihistamines.

Released:
17-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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    11-Apr-2018 3:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 691997

Study: Vaccine Suppresses Peanut Allergies in Mice

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A vaccine may successfully turn off peanut allergy in mice, a new study shows.

Released:
9-Apr-2018 1:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692514

What Does Asthma Have to Do with Your Allergies? Probably a Lot

American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

Some of what you think are allergy symptoms could be signs of asthma.

Released:
10-Apr-2018 11:20 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692504

Bee Prepared: How to Treat a Bee Sting

American Academy of Dermatology

It can happen fast. One minute the kids are all playing peacefully outside on a warm, spring day. The next minute a piercing scream reveals that one of them has been stung by a bee. To help alleviate the panic, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology say it’s a good idea to know what to do – and not do – to treat a bee sting.

Released:
10-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692086

Rutgers Medical Expert Available to Discuss How Winter Storms Affect This Year’s Allergy Season

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Released:
2-Apr-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    2-Apr-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 691962

Infants Exposed to Antacids, Antibiotics at Increased Risk for Childhood Allergies

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

Exposing infants to antacids or antibiotics in their first six months of life could increase their risk of developing allergies in childhood.

Released:
29-Mar-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 667765

A New Drug for Pediatric Cancer, Four-Legged Help, Neurocognitive Side Effects in Young Leukemia Survivors, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Newswise

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Released:
30-Mar-2018 4:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691743

Ragweed Casts Shade on Soy Production

American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Ragweed, its pollen potent to allergy sufferers, might be more than a source of sneezes. In the Midwest, the plant may pose a threat to soybean production.Scientists have found that ragweed can drastically reduce soybean yield.

Released:
28-Mar-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 691491

Western Diet Depletes Artery-Protecting Immune Cells

La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

New research from scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology shows how a diet high in fat and cholesterol depletes the ranks of artery-protecting immune cells, turning them into promoters of inflammation, which exacerbate atherosclerotic plaque buildup that occurs in cardiovascular disease. The team has also found that high density lipoproteins (HDL)—more commonly known as “good cholesterol”—counteract this process, helping the protective immune cells maintain their identity and keep arteries clear.

Released:
20-Mar-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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