Feature Channels:

Allergies

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Aging, Women's Health, Addiction, Allergy

Women’s Health Paper Offers Insight on Antidepressant-Induced Female Sexual Dysfunction

One in 6 women in the U.S. takes antidepressants to improve her well-being, but what is she to do when the medication that is meant to help disrupts another area of her life?

Medicine

Channels:

Allergies, Rush Desensitization, Antigens, Mast Cells

Mouse Study Shows How “Hair-of-the-Dog” Approach Works to Treat Allergies

Duke-Health-Sensitized-Desensized-Mast-Cells.W.jpeg

A research team led by Duke Health, using mice as the models, has described the cellular processes that occur during “rush desensitization.” The approach involves giving a small dose of the allergy trigger – peanuts or bee poison or even chemotherapy -- to the susceptible patient in small, yet increasing doses over a short period.

Medicine

Channels:

Feeding Babies Egg and Peanut May Prevent Food Allergy

Feeding babies egg and peanut may reduce their risk of developing an allergy to the foods, finds a new study.

Medicine

Channels:

Loyola, ENT, Pediatric, aerodigestive track disorders, Otolaryngology, ear, nose and throat, Tonsillectomy, Ear Tubes, Adenoids, Sleep Disorders, Asthma, Allergies, Airway, Swallowing, Tracheostomy

Pediatric ENT Specialist George Harris, MD, FACS, FAAP, Joins Loyola Medicine

Harris.jpg

Pediatric otolaryngologist George Harris, MD, FACS, FAAP, who specializes in aerodigestive track disorders, has joined Loyola Medicine.

Medicine

Channels:

Food Allergy, Allergist, Acaai, American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Annals of Allergy Asthma & Immunology

Is It Safe to Get Up Close and Personal with Food Allergy Triggers?

peanuts000012032314Small.jpg

An article in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology explains that food proximity challenges prove to most kids they can be near food allergy triggers without fear.

Medicine

Channels:

Cough, Allergies, Asthma, American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Allergist

What Does That Cough Really Mean?

Cough.jpg

With so much attention on coughs lately, do you ever wonder – when is a cough just a cough? When is it more? When is it something to really worry about? Allergist Bob Lanier, MD, executive director of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology has answers for you.

Medicine

Channels:

Microbiome, Asthma, Pediatrics, Genomics

Newborn Gut Microbiome Predicts Later Allergy and Asthma, Study Finds

The microbes living in a baby’s gut during its first month of life may directly impact the developing immune system, leading to a higher risk of allergies and asthma later in childhood. The findings highlight the importance of developing early interventions to improve microbial health in young infants.

Medicine

Channels:

SUNY Downstate’s Dr. Richard Rosenfeld Recommends Shared Decision-Making in Treating Adult Sinusitis

In an article in the New England Journal of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center’s Distinguished Professor and Chair of Otolaryngology Richard M. Rosenfeld, MD, MPH, recommends a process of shared decision-making between physicians and patients in the treatment of adult sinusitis.

Science

Channels:

Neautrophils, Tissues, Integrins, Inflammation, Nature Communications, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, Adhesion receptors

LJI Researchers Gain New Understanding of How Neutrophils Latch Onto Vessel Walls to Protect From Infection and Clean Up Injured Tissue

mAb24Kim127CellMask-3_AiryscanProcessing_c123.jpg

As an arm of the innate immune system, white blood cells called neutrophils form the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Neutrophils spend most of their lives racing through the bloodstream, patrolling for bacteria or other foreign particles. Once they arrive at tissues besieged by infectious agents, they halt on a dime and then blast through the vessel wall to reach the inflammatory attack site.

Medicine

Channels:

Food Allergy, Pediatrics, Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, Eczema, Epidemiology, Pediatric Allergy

Children with Food Allergies Are Predisposed to Asthma, Rhinitis

Children with a history of food allergy have a high risk of developing asthma and allergic rhinitis during childhood as well. The risk increases with the number of food allergies a child might have. Research suggests that U.S. disease rates may be changing for the common childhood conditions asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema.

Medicine

Channels:

AIDS, HIV, Genetics, Immunology/Allergies/Asthma, Medicine And Health, Vaccines

Mutational Tug of War Over HIV's Disease-Inducing Potential

A study from Emory AIDS researchers shows how the expected disease severity when someone is newly infected by HIV reflects a balance between the virus' invisibility to the host's immune system and its ability to reproduce.

Medicine

Channels:

Mathamatics, Statistics, Public Health, Medicine & Health, Virology

Risk of Fans Catching Dengue Fever During Olympics 'Very Low'

The risk of sports fans catching dengue fever during the Rio Olympics is very low, according to a new study involving mathematicians at the University of Strathclyde.

Medicine

Channels:

Peanut Allergies, nut-free schools, Allergist, Acaai, American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Anaphylaxis, Epinephrine

Do "Nut-Free" Schools Actually Help Avoid Allergic Reactions? As Kids Head Back to School, This Is a Topic on Many Parents' Minds. Pediatric Allergist David Stukus, MD, FACAAI, Can Help Answer Your Questions.

StukusHeadshot.jpg

Medicine

Channels:

Back To School, Colds, Headache, Conjunctivitis, pink eye, Stomach Ache, Nausea And Vomiting, Allergies, Back Pain

Physician Offers Tips on Battling Back-to-School Bugs

0616JenCaudle-whitecoatw.obadge-NY.jpg

Despite the wishes of some schoolchildren, there's no such thing as an endless summer, and a Rowan Medicine physician says it's not too soon for kids - and their parents - to start preparing for the big changes that arrive with the first school bells of fall.

Medicine

Channels:

Immunology/Allergies/Asthma, Cell Biology, Medicine & Health, Neurobiology

Seasonal Allergies Could Change Your Brain

Hay fever may do more than give you a stuffy nose and itchy eyes, seasonal allergies may change the brain, says a study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience.

Science

Channels:

Genomics, Allergens, Pollen, Plant Physiology, Allergic Diseases, Allergic Rhinitis, Asthma

Genomics Study Points to Origins of Pollen Allergens

A joint University of Adelaide-Shanghai Jiao Tong University study has provided the first broad picture of the evolution and possible functions in the plant of pollen allergens.

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer, Immunology/Allergies/Asthma, Medicine And Health, Molecular Biology, Virology

T Cell Revival Through PD-1: Clues for Cancer Immunotherapy

121017_web.jpg

Cancer immunotherapy drugs that block the inhibitory PD-1 pathway have shown success in clinical trials and are now FDA-approved for melanoma, lung cancer and bladder cancer. Yet many patients' tumors do not respond to these drugs.

Medicine

Channels:

Allergies, Asthma, Back To School, Back To School Asthma Plan, American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Allergist

Allergies and Asthma Can Be Harder to Control at School Than at Home

Back-to-school4.JPG

Parents need to start at home in order to control asthma and allergies when kids are at school. Uncontrolled asthma accounts for almost 14 million lost school days a year.

Medicine

Channels:

clinical laboratory, AACC Annual Scientific Meeting, Healthcare

Ortho Clinical Diagnostics to Present Seven Scientific Posters, Six Products at AACC

Ortho Clinical Diagnostics will present seven scientific posters on its assays and display six products at the 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) annual meeting. Ortho’s posters will address a range of important tests, both marketed and in-development for clinical labs.

Medicine

Channels:

Columbia Researchers Find Biological Explanation for Wheat Sensitivity

Researchers from Columbia University have found that people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity have a weakened intestinal barrier, which leads to a systemic immune response after ingesting wheat and related cereals.







Chat now!