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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Oct-2014 3:00 PM EDT

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Screening Questions Fail to Identify Teens at Risk for Hearing Loss

Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions.

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Scientists Restore Hearing in Noise-Deafened Mice, Pointing Way to New Therapies

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Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. By demonstrating the importance of the protein, called NT3, in maintaining communication between the ears and brain, these new findings pave the way for research in humans that could improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal aging.

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Researchers Create Software for Google Glass That Provides Captions for Hard-of-Hearing Users

A team of Georgia Institute of Technology researchers has created speech-to-text software for Google Glass that helps hard-of-hearing users with everyday conversations. A hard-of-hearing person wears Glass while a second person speaks directly into a smartphone. The speech is converted to text, sent to Glass and displayed on its heads-up display.

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Proteins Hey1 and Hey2 Ensure that Inner Ear 'Hair Cells' Are Made at the Right Time and in the Right Place

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Johns Hopkins neuroscientists have discovered the “molecular brakes” that time the generation of important cells in the inner ear cochleas of mice. These “hair cells” translate sound waves into electrical signals that are carried to the brain and are interpreted as sounds. If the arrangement of the cells is disordered, hearing is impaired.

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University Hospitals Case Medical Center Implants New Hybrid Cochlear Implant in Patient Who Lost High Frequency Hearing

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A new type of hybrid cochlear device that combines a hearing aid for low frequency sound and an electric stimulator for high frequency sound has been implanted by surgeons at University Hospitals Case Medical Center.

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New Mapping Approach Lets Scientists Zoom In and Out as the Brain Processes Sound

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins have mapped the sound-processing part of the mouse brain in a way that keeps both the proverbial forest and the trees in view. Their imaging technique allows zooming in and out on views of brain activity within mice, and it enabled the team to watch brain cells light up as mice “called” to each other. The results, which represent a step toward better understanding how our own brains process language, appear online July 31 the journal Neuron.

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Texas A&M, Stanford Researchers Advance Understanding Of How Hearing Works

Understanding how hearing works has long been hampered by challenges associated with seeing inside the inner ear, but technology being developed by a team of researchers, including one from Texas A&M University, is generating some of the most detailed images of the inner ear to date.

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Retired NFL Players May be at Risk for Hearing Loss and Tinnitus

Retired NFL players may be at risk for permanent hearing loss and tinnitus, according to Loyola University Medical Center ear surgeon John Leonetti, MD.

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Henry Ford Seeks Tinnitus Patients for Vagal Nerve Stimulation Clinical Trial

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Henry Ford Health System, in collaboration with Wayne State University, is one of four sites worldwide involved in a clinical trial that will test a device that uses nervous system stimuli to rewire parts of the brain, in hopes of significantly reducing or removing tinnitus, a chronic ringing of the head or ears that affects more than 50 million people.

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