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Osteoporosis Diagnosis Contributes to Hearing Loss Risk

People who have osteoporosis face a 1.76-fold higher risk of developing sudden deafness than those who do not have the bone disease, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Soldiers Cite ‘Medic!’ as a Top Hearing Priority

‘Medic!’, ‘Hold fire!’ and grid references are amongst the highest priorities for soldiers to be able to hear while on duty, according to new research from the University of Southampton.

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A Sign of the Times for Hearing Impaired Patients

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Harris Health System is now using sign language video technology to better communicate with its hearing-impaired and hard-of-hearing patients. Connecting patients with physicians and nurses in a timely and convenient manner is one of the driving forces behind the new portable iPad®-equipped wheeled carts (similar to rolling blood-pressure stands) that act as in-person translators of American Sign Language for patients and staff at a moment’s notice. The program has four such carts complete with speakers and audio enhancement capability at Harris Health’s Ben Taub, Quentin Mease and Lyndon B. Johnson hospitals.

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Study Shows Longer-Term CMV Treatment Effective for Symptomatic Babies

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Previous research indicated six weeks of treatment improved hearing, but new findings published in the New England Journal of Medicine reveal six months is better.

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Researchers Find Salicylates, a Class of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (Nsaids), Stop Growth of Vestibular Schwannomas

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Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Harvard Medical School/ Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology have demonstrated that salicylates, a class of non-steroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), reduced the proliferation and viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells that cause a sometimes lethal intracranial tumor that typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus.

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Patient Older Age Not an Issue in Revision Cochlear Implantation

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Sometimes patients with coclear implants need to have a second or "revision" implantation surgery because of device failure. A new study finds that adults age 65 and older do just as well in speech perception after revision cochlear implantation as those younger than 65.

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Scientists Discover Blocking Notch Inhibition Pathway Provides a New Route to Hair Cell Regeneration for Hearing Restoration

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Scientists from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School and Fudan University have shown that blocking the Notch pathway plays an essential role that determines cochlear progenitor cell proliferation capacity.

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Quiet as a Mouse, but So Much to Hear

Micheal L. Dent, a University at Buffalo psychologist, listens to what is inaudible to others. And what she’s hearing might one day help us better understand human hearing loss.

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TSRI Researchers Find How Mutant Gene Can Cause Deafness

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies.

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Are Ear Infections Overtreated in White Children?

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Black children are less likely to be diagnosed with and less likely to receive broad-spectrum antibiotics for ear infections than white children are, a new study has found. But the discrepancy in prescribing fewer broad-spectrum antibiotics means black children actually are more likely to receive care that aligns with the recommended guidelines for treating ear infections. Possible behaviors explaining the trend are overdiagnosis and overtreatment in white children and underdiagnosis and undertreatment in black children. The report appears in Pediatrics online on November 17, 2014.