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Study Shows Longer-Term CMV Treatment Effective for Symptomatic Babies

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Previous research indicated six weeks of treatment improved hearing, but new findings published in the New England Journal of Medicine reveal six months is better.

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Researchers Find Salicylates, a Class of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (Nsaids), Stop Growth of Vestibular Schwannomas

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Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Harvard Medical School/ Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology have demonstrated that salicylates, a class of non-steroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), reduced the proliferation and viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells that cause a sometimes lethal intracranial tumor that typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus.

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Patient Older Age Not an Issue in Revision Cochlear Implantation

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Sometimes patients with coclear implants need to have a second or "revision" implantation surgery because of device failure. A new study finds that adults age 65 and older do just as well in speech perception after revision cochlear implantation as those younger than 65.

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Scientists Discover Blocking Notch Inhibition Pathway Provides a New Route to Hair Cell Regeneration for Hearing Restoration

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Scientists from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School and Fudan University have shown that blocking the Notch pathway plays an essential role that determines cochlear progenitor cell proliferation capacity.

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Quiet as a Mouse, but So Much to Hear

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Micheal L. Dent, a University at Buffalo psychologist, listens to what is inaudible to others. And what she’s hearing might one day help us better understand human hearing loss.

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TSRI Researchers Find How Mutant Gene Can Cause Deafness

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies.

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Are Ear Infections Overtreated in White Children?

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Black children are less likely to be diagnosed with and less likely to receive broad-spectrum antibiotics for ear infections than white children are, a new study has found. But the discrepancy in prescribing fewer broad-spectrum antibiotics means black children actually are more likely to receive care that aligns with the recommended guidelines for treating ear infections. Possible behaviors explaining the trend are overdiagnosis and overtreatment in white children and underdiagnosis and undertreatment in black children. The report appears in Pediatrics online on November 17, 2014.

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Ears and Hearing Effects Continue to Reverberate after Boston Marathon Bombing

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Boston researchers detail the types of otologic injury suffered by victims of the Boston Marathon bombing and report on the outcomes of patients undergoing otologic treatment in this paper in Otology & Neurology.

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High Rate of Ear and Hearing Injuries after Boston Marathon Bombings

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After the Boston Marathon bombings, more than 100 people were treated for trauma affecting the ears and hearing—with many having persistent or worsening hearing loss or other symptoms, reports a study in the December issue of Otology & Neurotology. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

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Best Supporting Actors – in Your Ears? U-M Research Points to Potential Way to Restore Hearing

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There’s a cast of characters deep inside your ears -- many kinds of tiny cells working together to allow you to hear. The lead actors, called hair cells, play the crucial role in carrying sound signals to the brain. But new research shows that when it comes to restoring lost hearing ability, the spotlight may fall on some of the ear’s supporting actors – and their understudies.