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Quiet as a Mouse, but So Much to Hear

Micheal L. Dent, a University at Buffalo psychologist, listens to what is inaudible to others. And what she’s hearing might one day help us better understand human hearing loss.

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TSRI Researchers Find How Mutant Gene Can Cause Deafness

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered how one gene is essential to hearing, uncovering a cause of deafness and suggesting new avenues for therapies.

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Are Ear Infections Overtreated in White Children?

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Black children are less likely to be diagnosed with and less likely to receive broad-spectrum antibiotics for ear infections than white children are, a new study has found. But the discrepancy in prescribing fewer broad-spectrum antibiotics means black children actually are more likely to receive care that aligns with the recommended guidelines for treating ear infections. Possible behaviors explaining the trend are overdiagnosis and overtreatment in white children and underdiagnosis and undertreatment in black children. The report appears in Pediatrics online on November 17, 2014.

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Ears and Hearing Effects Continue to Reverberate after Boston Marathon Bombing

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Boston researchers detail the types of otologic injury suffered by victims of the Boston Marathon bombing and report on the outcomes of patients undergoing otologic treatment in this paper in Otology & Neurology.

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High Rate of Ear and Hearing Injuries after Boston Marathon Bombings

After the Boston Marathon bombings, more than 100 people were treated for trauma affecting the ears and hearing—with many having persistent or worsening hearing loss or other symptoms, reports a study in the December issue of Otology & Neurotology. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

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Best Supporting Actors – in Your Ears? U-M Research Points to Potential Way to Restore Hearing

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There’s a cast of characters deep inside your ears -- many kinds of tiny cells working together to allow you to hear. The lead actors, called hair cells, play the crucial role in carrying sound signals to the brain. But new research shows that when it comes to restoring lost hearing ability, the spotlight may fall on some of the ear’s supporting actors – and their understudies.

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Novel Tinnitus Therapy Helps Patients Cope with Phantom Noise

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Patients with tinnitus hear phantom noise and are sometimes so bothered by the perceived ringing in their ears, they have difficulty concentrating. A new therapy does not lessen perception of the noise but appears to help patients cope better with it in their daily lives, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

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Hearing Loss in One Infant Twin Affects Mother’s Speech to Both Babies

Is it possible that hearing loss in one infant from a pair of twins can affect the mother’s speech to both infants? A new acoustics study zeroes in on this question and suggests that not only is this alteration of speech entirely possible, but that mothers speak to both infants as if they are hearing impaired.

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Screening Questions Fail to Identify Teens at Risk for Hearing Loss

Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions.

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Scientists Restore Hearing in Noise-Deafened Mice, Pointing Way to New Therapies

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Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. By demonstrating the importance of the protein, called NT3, in maintaining communication between the ears and brain, these new findings pave the way for research in humans that could improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal aging.

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