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Firework Precautions to Help Keep Your Family Safe This Summer

Fireworks can result in severe burns, scars and disfigurement that can last a lifetime. Fireworks that are often thought to be safe, such as sparklers, can reach temperatures above 2000 degrees Fahrenheit, and can burn users and bystanders. Injuries most often occur on the face or hand, and burns make up roughly 50% of firework injuries.

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4th of July Means Danger to Hearing

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Loud noise hurts hearing. Health tips and warning signs from Candace Blank, audiologist at Loyola University Health System.

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Don’t Forget to Protect the Ears When Taking Little Ones to the Fireworks

They’ve packed the sunscreen and bug spray to protect their little ones while enjoying a Fourth of July celebration, but many parents don’t think about the potential damage that the loud fireworks can do to a young child’s ears.

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UB Researchers Take Important Steps Toward Understanding How Animals Make Sense of the Auditory World

Sit down with a friend in a quiet restaurant and begin talking, just before the dinner crowd’s arrival. Business is slow at first, but picks up quickly, just like the sound level. Discussions are everywhere, colliding and competing with the other noises.

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Gene Modulation Method May Provide Insight on Regrowing Inner-Ear Sensory Hair Cells

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Sonia Rocha-Sanchez, Ph.D., an associate professor of oral biology in the Creighton University School of Dentistry, and an expert in the biology and physiology of the inner ear, has developed a method to temporally modify the expression of the retinoblastoma-1 gene in mice. Modulation of the RB1 gene can allow for the regrowth of cells in the inner ear and potentially restore hearing and balance caused by the loss of sensory hair cells.

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Wichita State University Researcher: Cardiovascular Health Affects Hearing, Speech

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Ray Hull, professor of communication sciences and disorders in audiology/neurosciences at Wichita State University, has concluded research analyzing 84 years of work from scientists worldwide into the connection between cardiovascular health and the ability to hear and understand what others are saying. Hull’s work connected the dots from 70 scientific studies to confirm a direct link.

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Anti-Stroke Drug Effective Treatment for Middle-Ear Infections, Researchers Say

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An existing anti-stroke drug is an effective treatment for middle-ear infections, showing the ability to suppress mucus overproduction, improve bacterial clearance and reduce hearing loss, according to researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Rochester.

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Loyola Audiologist Offers Tips for Protecting Your Hearing This Summer

“Noise-induced hearing loss can be permanent. The damage to the ear cannot be repaired, but there are options to improve the hearing,” says Candace Blank, AuD, audiologist chief, Loyola University Health System. Here are sample decibels of common sounds and tips to save hearing.

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Hearing Negatively Impacts Speech Development

“Being aware of the benchmarks of development can help caregivers and parents make sure children in their care are progressing appropriately,” says Kaitlyn Vogtner Trainor, speech-language pathologist at Loyola University Health System. "Lapses in development can also help identify medical conditions.”

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How Does the Brain Respond to Hearing Loss?

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Researchers at the University of Colorado suggest that the portion of the brain devoted to hearing can become reorganized even with early-stage hearing loss, and may play a role in cognitive decline. They have applied fundamental principles of neuroplasticity, the ability of the brain to forge new connections, to determine the ways it adapts to hearing loss, as well as the consequences of those changes, and their findings will be presented at ASA’s 169th meeting.