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Shape of Inner Ear Helps Predict Hearing Loss for Children with Rare Hearing Loss Disorder

It may be possible to predict the severity of hearing loss for children diagnosed with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, according to a new study published in JAMA-Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

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Early Infant Weight Gain, Preventing Vision Loss, Sesame Street's Julia, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Medicine

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Hearing Aid, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss, Hearing Aid Use, Hearing Aid Training, Audiologist, Audiologists, Audiology

New Program Improves Hearing Aid Use for Older Adults

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More than half of older adults have some form of hearing loss, impacting everyday life and significantly affecting their health and safety if left untreated. Hearing aids are the most common treatment for hearing loss; however, many adults fail to adjust to hearing aids and, as a result, stop using them. Now, a new hearing aid adjustment program created by Kari Lane, assistant professor in the Sinclair School of Nursing at the University of Missouri, might significantly improve hearing aid wear time among older adults.

Medicine

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Improving the ER, Opioids and Surgery, Colds in Transplant Patients, Hearing Aids, and More in the Healthcare News Source

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

Medicine

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Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss, Audiology, Expert

Audiologist Available to Comment on Over-the-Counter vs. Prescription Hearing Aids.

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Medicine

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Genetics, ophthalmolgy, coloboma, Blindness, Deafness, Waardenburg syndrome, Children, National Eye Institute (NEI), National Institutes Of Health (NIH), Albinism, Genetic Testing

Media Availability: NIH Scientists Identify Disorder Causing Blindness, Deafness, Albinism and Fragile Bones

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, have identified the genetic underpinnings of a rare disorder that causes children to be born with deafness, blindness, albinism and fragile bones.

Business

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Kimberlee Jones, John Tracy Clinic, JTC, Vice President, Chief Development Officer, Pediatric hearing loss, early intervention services, Hearing Loss

John Tracy Clinic Welcomes Kimberlee Jones as VP and Chief Development Officer

Ms. Jones brings more than two decades of fundraising experience to JTC.

Medicine

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Hearing Loss, Stem Cell Therapy, Regeneration Of Hair Cells, Deafness

New Technique Generates High Volume of Sensory Cells Needed for Hearing

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In 2013, Mass. Eye and Ear researchers restored partial hearing to mice by regenerating hair cells — tiny, sound-sensing cells in the ear, which are lost through noise damage, age, etc., and do not regenerate on their own — by converting stem cells found in the ear into hair cells. However, the success of restoring hearing through this approach was limited by the small number of cells that could be turned into hair cells. In a new study in Cell Reports, a research team from Mass. Eye and Ear, Brigham and Women's Hospital and MIT has shown that they can augment the number of those cells, and then convert that large population into hair cells, lending hope that full hearing can be restored to those with hearing loss due to damaged hair cells.

Medicine

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Hearing Loss, hidden hearing loss, Audiology, Ear And Hearing, Noise Induced Hearing Loss, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelin diseases, Demyelination Diseases

Second Cause of Hidden Hearing Loss Identified

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Some people can pass a hearing test but have trouble understanding speech in a noisy environment. New research identifies a new mechanism for this condition just years after its discovery.

Medicine

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Premature Birth, NICU, Preemie Care

NICU Study Highlights Need to Reduce Loud Noises, Boost Beneficial Sounds

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that preemies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may be exposed to noise levels higher than those deemed safe by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Conversely, the researchers also found that some preemies may not get enough exposure to beneficial sounds, such as language and music, that can improve early development.







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