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University Hospitals Case Medical Center Implants New Hybrid Cochlear Implant in Patient Who Lost High Frequency Hearing

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A new type of hybrid cochlear device that combines a hearing aid for low frequency sound and an electric stimulator for high frequency sound has been implanted by surgeons at University Hospitals Case Medical Center.

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New Mapping Approach Lets Scientists Zoom In and Out as the Brain Processes Sound

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins have mapped the sound-processing part of the mouse brain in a way that keeps both the proverbial forest and the trees in view. Their imaging technique allows zooming in and out on views of brain activity within mice, and it enabled the team to watch brain cells light up as mice “called” to each other. The results, which represent a step toward better understanding how our own brains process language, appear online July 31 the journal Neuron.

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Texas A&M, Stanford Researchers Advance Understanding Of How Hearing Works

Understanding how hearing works has long been hampered by challenges associated with seeing inside the inner ear, but technology being developed by a team of researchers, including one from Texas A&M University, is generating some of the most detailed images of the inner ear to date.

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Retired NFL Players May be at Risk for Hearing Loss and Tinnitus

Retired NFL players may be at risk for permanent hearing loss and tinnitus, according to Loyola University Medical Center ear surgeon John Leonetti, MD.

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Henry Ford Seeks Tinnitus Patients for Vagal Nerve Stimulation Clinical Trial

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Henry Ford Health System, in collaboration with Wayne State University, is one of four sites worldwide involved in a clinical trial that will test a device that uses nervous system stimuli to rewire parts of the brain, in hopes of significantly reducing or removing tinnitus, a chronic ringing of the head or ears that affects more than 50 million people.

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Fireworks, Construction, Marching Bands Can Cause Permanent Hearing Loss

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One in 10 Americans has hearing loss that affects their ability to understand normal speech. Exposure to excessive noise also can damage hearing in higher pitches. “Hearing loss due to excessive noise is totally preventable, unlike hearing loss due to old age or a medical condition,” Dr. Bhayani says.

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Researchers Identify Pattern of Cognitive Risks in Some Children with Cochlear Implants

Children with profound deafness who receive a cochlear implant had as much as five times the risk of having delays in areas of working memory, controlled attention, planning and conceptual learning as children with normal hearing, according to Indiana University research published in JAMA Otolaryngology.

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Sleep Apnea Tied to Hearing Loss in Large Study

Both high and low frequency hearing impairment have been linked with sleep apnea in a new study of nearly 14,000 individuals.

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UVA Unlocks Pitch-Detection Secrets of the Inner Ear

The ability to discern pitch – to hear the difference between “cat,” “bat” and “hat,” for example – hinges on remarkable gradations in specialized cells within the inner ear. New research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine and the National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders has explained, for the first time, what controls these cells’ development and patterning – findings crucial to efforts to reverse hearing loss caused by age, loud sounds or other factors.

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Report: Ongoing Quest to Silence Tinnitus

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Tinnitus affects roughly 50 million people and is now the No. 1 disability among our men and women in uniform, costing the U.S. about $1.7 billion a year to treat. But even with these staggering numbers, there's still no know cure for tinnitus. Today, Dr. Michael Seidman, a national leader in the treatment and study of tinnitus, will present a culmination of years of research at the Combined OTO Spring Meetings in Las Vegas.

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