Feature Channels

Aging

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Einstein-Montefiore Investigators Present Aging Research at Gerontological Society of America’s Annual Scientific Conference

Einstein and Montefiore to present new research that reveals a genotype that can predict survival and risk factors for cognitive impairment.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

To Reap the Brain Benefits of Physical Activity, Just Get Moving!

Everyone knows that exercise makes you feel more mentally alert at any age. But do you need to follow a specific training program to improve your cognitive function? Science has shown that the important thing is to just get moving. It's that simple. In fact, this was the finding of a study conducted at the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal (IUGM), an institution affiliated with Université de Montréal, by Dr. Nicolas Berryman, PhD, Exercise Physiologist, under the supervision of Dr. Louis Bherer, PhD, and Dr. Laurent Bosquet, PhD, that was published in the journal AGE (American Aging Association) in October.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Baby Boomers and Scoliosis: Osteoporosis Is Risk Factor

For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon Paul Huddleston, M.D., explains how scoliosis develops, prevention and treatment options and a trend he is seeing in Baby Boomer women.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Nearly Half of Older Americans Need Support with Daily Routines

About 18 million Americans age 65 and older require help with routine daily activities like bathing, handling medications or meals, finds a new study in Milbank Quarterly. The research shows a growing need for improved services and support for older Americans, their spouses, their children and other "informal caregivers."

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Aging in Place: Does a Loved One Need a Geriatric Assessment?

TroenBruce.jpg

By a tremendous margin – over 95 percent – older Americans choose to live at home or with relatives. Families making that choice should consider seeking the assistance of a geriatric specialist, especially when they see changes in their loved one’s behavior, says Bruce R. Troen, MD, chief of the division of geriatrics and palliative medicine in the Department of Medicine at the University at Buffalo.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Middle-Aged Adults Were More Susceptible to the Flu Last Year Because of a New Viral Mutation

Wistar researchers have identified a new mutation in the H1N1 influenza virus that made it easily transmitted in middle-aged adults--those who should be able to resist the viral assault--during the 2013-2014 influenza season. .

View | Comment

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Memory Decline Among Menopausal Women Could Be Next Research Frontier for Hypnotic Relaxation Therapy

GaryElkins2.jpg

Memory decline — a frequent complaint of menopausal women — potentially could be lessened by hypnotic relaxation therapy, say Baylor University researchers, who already have done studies showing that such therapy eases hot flashes, improves sleep and reduces stress in menopausal women.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Using a Novel Biological Aging Clock, UCLA Researchers Find That Obesity Accelerates Aging of the Liver

HorvathGraphic.jpg

Using a recently developed biomarker of aging known as an epigenetic clock, UCLA researchers working closely with a German team of investigators have found for the first time that obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver.

View | Comment

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Insomnia Among Older Adults May Be Tied to Sleep Quality, Not Duration

Reports of insomnia are common among the elderly, but a new study finds that sleep problems may stem from the quality of rest and other health concerns more than the overall amount of sleep that patients get.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Decreased Ability to Identify Odors Can Predict Death

20140926_Pinto_7549.jpg

The inability of older adults to identify scents is a strong predictor of death within five years. Almost 40% of those who failed a smelling test died during that period, compared to 10% of those with a healthy sense of smell. Olfactory dysfunction predicted mortality better than a diagnosis of heart failure or cancer.

View | Comment