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The Sound of Intellect: Job Seeker's Voice Reveals Intelligence

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A new study by University of Chicago Booth School of Business Professor Nicholas Epley and Ph.D. candidate Juliana Schroeder found that when hypothetical employers and professional recruiters listened to or read job candidates' job qualifications, they rated the candidates as more competent, thoughtful and intelligent when they heard the pitch than when they read it.

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"Rock-N-Omics" Professor at NSU Releases 2015 Economic Forecast Video

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Is Cheating on the Field Worse Than Cheating on a Spouse? Some Fans Think So

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Why did fans and sponsors such as Nike drop Lance Armstrong but stay loyal to Tiger Woods? Probably because Armstrong's doping scandal took place on the field, unlike Wood's off-the-field extramarital affairs, according to new studies.

Life

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Monograph Suggests Moving Away From Government Policy Intervention During Economic Recession

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n a monograph recently published by the Institute of Economic Affairs, author Roger Koppl, professor of finance at the Martin J. Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University, dissects the recent Great Recession in the United States and the prolonged economic slump that followed. In “From Crisis to Confidence: Macroeconomics After the Crash,” Koppl asserts that what may appear as market failure was actually the consequence of failed government policies. He makes a case for moving away from government command and control toward freer exchange.

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Is the Customer Always Right? Workplace Deviance Expert Tackles Age-Old Question

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As long as there are servers in restaurants, there will be disagreeable customers who give them a hard time. Are those customers always right? And how should a server respond? Employers and managers can take preemptive steps to help their employees engage with meal-time curmudgeons.

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Bus Travel Between US Cities Increases in 2014

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Research from the Chaddick Institute at DePaul University shows intercity bus departures grew 2.1 percent last year. Lead researcher Joseph Schwieterman says, "Once people switch to the bus, they often become frequent users, in part due to the generous allowances bus companies provide to change departure times.”

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Breaking Bad: “Dry” Counties See Rise in Meth Labs

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The Wall Street Journal reports that a recent economic study found that Kentucky’s “dry” counties, where alcohol sales are banned, have more meth lab seizures per capita than do the state’s “wet” counties where liquor is legal.

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Not All Obese People Develop Metabolic Problems Linked to Excess Weight​​​​

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In a study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, researchers found that a subset of obese people do not have common metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity, such as insulin resistance, abnormal blood lipids (high triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol), high blood pressure and excess liver fat. In addition, obese people who didn’t have these metabolic problems when the study began did not develop them even after they gained more weight.

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Throwing Money at Data Breach May Make It Worse

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Information systems researchers at the U of A studied the effect of two compensation strategies used by Target after a large-scale data breach and found that customers reacted favorably to a 10-percent discount on purchases.

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Ideology Prevents Wheat Growers From Converting to More Profitable Methods, New Study Shows

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Many U.S. wheat growers resist converting to a more profitable method of farming because of their personal beliefs about organic farming rather than technical or material obstacles, according to a new study.