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More Power to You

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Engineers from the University of Utah and the University of Minnesota have discovered that interfacing two particular oxide-based materials makes them highly conductive, a boon for future electronics that could result in much more power-efficient laptops, electric cars and home appliances that also don’t need cumbersome power supplies.

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New Evidence: How Amino Acid Cysteine Combats Huntington’s Disease

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have identified a biochemical pathway linking oxidative stress and the amino acid cysteine in Huntington’s disease.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Jul-2016 11:00 AM EDT

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Study: Businesses Can’t Afford to Ignore the Human Element of IT

Mood and personality play an important role in how companies should manage their IT systems, according to a new study co-authored by a researcher at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Dirty to Drinkable

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A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis has found a way to use graphene oxide sheets to transform dirty water into drinking water, and it could be a global game-changer.

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Scientists Identify Novel Genes Linked to Motor Neuron Disease

Published today in Nature Genetics, the study reveals three new risk genes for ALS and one of these - C21orf2 - increases an individual's risk of developing the dis-ease by 65 per cent. These results could aid the development of personalised treatments for people with ALS by using gene therapy - an approach which involves replacing faulty genes or adding new ones.

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Nova Southeastern University Researcher Discovers Unique Anatomical Characteristic in Barnacle Study

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NSU research scientist collaborated with colleague to study the male sexual organ of barnacles, which it turns out is a marine creature that has been studied dating all the way back to Charles Darwin.

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Childhood Illness Not Linked to Higher Adult Mortality

Childhood illness not linked to higher adult mortality

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Invasive Garden 'Super Ants' Take Hold Faster Than Ever in UK, New Research Finds

First discovered in 2009, there are now a total of six known UK infestations of the Lasius neglectus which thrive in greenhouses and domestic gardens. Originating from Asia, they are likely to have arrived in the UK through the import of plants from infected areas.

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International Study Finds Effective, Less Toxic Way to Treat Brain Tumors

/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Physicians from Carolinas HealthCare System's Neurosciences Institute and Levine Cancer Institute are among the authors of a study that was accepted for publication by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The study, released on July 26, 2016, shows that patients with the most common form of brain tumor can be treated in an effective and substantially less toxic way by omitting a widely used portion of radiation therapy. These results will allow tens of thousands of patients with brain tumors to experience a better quality of life while maintaining the same length of life.

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Japanese Tadpoles Relax in Hot Springs

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Japanese tadpoles can live and grow in natural hots springs, or onsen, with water temperatures as high as 46.1oC (115oF). Living in onsen may benefit the tadpoles' immune systems, speed their growth, and allow the tadpoles to survive on small volcanic islands where there are few other natural sources of fresh water.

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Americans Worried About Using Gene Editing, Brain Chip Implants and Synthetic Blood

Many in the general public think scientific and technological innovations bring helpful change to society, but they are more concerned than excited when it comes to the potential use of emerging technologies to make people's minds sharper, their bodies stronger and healthier than ever before, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

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Plasma Technology Can Be Tapped to Kill Biofilms on Perishable Fruit, Foods

Seeing fruit “turn bad and going to waste” inspired a team of researchers in China to explore using atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma -- already widely used for medical purposes -- as a novel solution to extend the shelf life of fruit and other perishable foods. Now they report in Physics of Plasmas about their computational study of how air plasma interacts with bacterial biofilms on an apple’s surface suggests that plasma technology could be used to decontaminate food in the future.

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Making Terahertz Lasers More Powerful

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Researchers have nearly doubled the continuous output power of a type of laser, called a terahertz quantum cascade laser, with potential applications in medical imaging, airport security and more. Increasing the continuous output power of these lasers is an important step toward increasing the range of practical applications. The researchers report their results in the journal AIP Advances.

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Digging Deeper Into Mars

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Water is the key to life on Earth. Scientists continue to unravel the mystery of life on Mars by investigating evidence of water in the planet's soil. Previous observations of soil observed along crater slopes on Mars showed a significant amount of perchlorate salts, which tend to be associated with brines with a moderate pH level. However, researchers have stepped back to look at the bigger picture through data collected from the 2001: Mars Odyssey, named in reference to the science fiction novel by Arthur C. Clarke, "2001: A Space Odyssey," and found a different chemical on Mars may be key. The researchers found that the bulk soil on Mars, across regional scales the size of the U.S. or larger, likely contains iron sulfates bearing chemically bound water, which typically result in acidic brines. This new observation suggests that iron sulfates may play a major role in hydrating martian soil.

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Spiders Spin Unique Phononic Material

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New discoveries about spider silk could inspire novel materials to manipulate sound and heat in the same way semiconducting circuits manipulate electrons, according to scientists at Rice University, in Europe and in Singapore.

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Human ‘Super Predator’ More Terrifying Than Bears, Wolves and Dogs

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Bears, wolves and other large carnivores are frightening beasts but the fear they inspire in their prey pales in comparison to that caused by the human ‘super predator.’

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Columbia Researchers Find Biological Explanation for Wheat Sensitivity

Researchers from Columbia University have found that people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity have a weakened intestinal barrier, which leads to a systemic immune response after ingesting wheat and related cereals.

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Why Baby Boomers Need a Hepatitis C Screening

Hepatitis C affects a disproportionate amount of older Americans, born between 1945-1965. A University of Michigan Health System strategy is helping them get tested.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Jul-2016 5:00 PM EDT