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Article ID: 695154

Study: Exercise Helps Treat Addiction by Altering Brain’s Dopamine System

University at Buffalo

New research by the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions has identified a key mechanism in how aerobic exercise can help impact the brain in ways that may support treatment — and even prevention strategies — for addiction.

Released:
25-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Embargo will expire:
31-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
25-May-2018 12:00 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 31-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

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  • Embargo expired:
    25-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695144

Four Factors Predict Chronic Opioid Use, Suggests Study by WVU Researchers

West Virginia University

Four factors increase the odds that a patient will wind up on chronic opioid therapy, suggests research conducted by a team of researchers led by Nilanjana Dwibedi, assistant professor in the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy.

Released:
29-May-2018 8:45 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695145

Researchers Find Genetic Aberrations Responsible for Congenital Diseases That Are Undetectable by Conventional Genetic Screening

Mount Sinai Health System

The research team identified novel epigenetic mutations to be a significant contributor to neurodevelopmental disorders and congenital anomalies

Released:
25-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695143

Team Cracks Code on Cheap Carbon Nanotubes Made From Toxic Air

Vanderbilt University

Carbon nanotubes are supermaterials that can be stronger than steel and more conductive than copper. They’re not in everything because these amazing properties only show up in the tiniest nanotubes, which formerly were extremely expensive.

Released:
25-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
31-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
25-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT

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Article ID: 695141

Plastic Pollution Plagues Raritan and Passaic Rivers

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Generations of Rutgers students and alumni have sung lovingly about the “Banks of the Old Raritan,” but the 90-mile-long waterway is awash in microplastic pollutants, a problem that plagues many freshwaters in New Jersey. In a recent study, researchers from Rutgers University–New Brunswick and other institutions found high levels of tiny pieces of plastic – often fragments from bigger items – in the Raritan and Passaic rivers. They later identified more than 300 organic chemical compounds that appeared to be associated with microplastic particles in the two rivers.

Released:
25-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694950

Alcohol, Anger and Aggression: An Unhappy Combination

Research Society on Alcoholism

Researchers asked 60 adult participants (31 men, 29 women) – recruited through newspaper advertisements – to record their daily social interactions for 20 days. Specifically, for each interaction, participants reported their perception of their interacting partner’s quarrelsome behavior, their own anger and quarrelsome behavior, and the number of alcoholic drinks consumed up to three hours prior to the event.

Released:
22-May-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Embargo will expire:
30-May-2018 7:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
25-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-May-2018 7:00 AM EDT

  • Embargo expired:
    25-May-2018 8:55 AM EDT

Article ID: 695049

NYU Professor Replicates Longitudinal Work on Famous Marshmallow Test for the First Time, Makes New Observations

New York University

A new replication study of the well-known “marshmallow test” – a famous psychological experiment designed to measure children’s self-control – suggests that being able to delay gratification at a young age may not be as predictive of later life outcomes as was previously thought.

Released:
23-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences


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