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Science

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Drought, Climate Change, agriculture and climate change, plants and climate change, Plants, University of Washington, Forecast Accuracy

Plants' Future Water Use Affects Long-Term Drought Estimates

Many popular long-term drought estimates ignore the fact that plants will be less thirsty as carbon dioxide goes up. Plants’ lower water use could roughly halve some current estimates for the extent of future drought, especially in central Africa and temperate Asia.

Medicine

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Opioid, Pain Medication

Scientists Report on Safe, Non-Addictive Opioid Analgesic in Animal Model

Since the isolation of morphine from opium in the 19th century, scientists have hoped to find a potent opioid analgesic that isn’t addictive and doesn’t cause respiratory arrest with increased doses.

Medicine

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Diagnostics, Metabolism, Cell Biology, Psychiatry

Researchers Identify Characteristic Chemical Signature for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a mysterious and maddening condition, with no cure or known cause. But researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, using a variety of techniques to identify and assess targeted metabolites in blood plasma, have identified a characteristic chemical signature for the debilitating ailment and an unexpected underlying biology: It is similar to the state of dauer, and other hypometabolic syndromes like caloric restriction, diapause and hibernation.

Science

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Nature, Hematology, Cells, Cell Development, Cell Biology, Cell Genetics, Developmental Biology, Hematopoietic, Cell Cycle, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, press release, news, Pediatrics

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 31-Aug-2016 1:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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Optometry & Vision Science, Eyes, Astigmatism, Myopia, internal astigmatism, Sight

'Internal Astigmatism' Doesn't Compensate for Changes in the Eye Over Time

For people with nearsightedness (myopia), the lens doesn't compensate for growth or other changes in the structure of the eye, according to a long-term follow-up study in the September issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Science

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Astrophyics, Proxima Centauri, Proxima Centauri b, habitable zone, Physics & Astronomy, Weizmann Institute Of Science

Earth-Mass Planet Right Next Door

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A potentially habitable planet – Proxima Centauri b – has been found virtually next door to Earth: about four light years away. The Weizmann Institute’s Dr. Aviv Ofir is a member of the “Pale Red Dot” project; the team found that the new planet may have balmy temperatures and liquid water, albeit a fast orbit. Can it host life? Further research is underway.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Science, X-ray science, Materials Science, LCLS , Linac Coherent Light Source, photon science, SIMES

Poof! The Weird Case of the X-Ray That Came Out Blank

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Imagine getting a medical X-ray that comes out blank – as if your bones had vanished. That’s what happened when scientists cranked up the intensity of the world’s first X-ray laser, at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, to get a better look at a sample they were studying: The X-rays seemed to go right through it as if it were not there.

Medicine

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Hongjun Song, Guo-li Ming, Hengli Tang, zika, Drugs, cell, Infection, Virus

New Hope for Zika Treatment Found in Large-Scale Screen of Existing Drugs

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Scientists report that a specialized drug screen test using lab-grown human cells has revealed two classes of compounds already in the pharmaceutical arsenal that may work against mosquito-borne Zika virus infections.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Ode to Recall: To Remember Events in Order, We Rely on the Brain’s “Symphony”

To remember events in the order they occur, the brain’s neurons function in a coordinated way that is akin to a symphony, a team of NYU scientists has found. Their findings offer new insights into how we recall information and point to factors that may disrupt certain types of memories.

Science

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valleytronics, Graphene, beyond silicon

A Device to Control “Color” of Electrons in Graphene Provides Path to Future Electronics

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A device made of bilayer graphene is one step forward in a new field of physics called valleytronics.

Science

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2D materials, next generation electronics, Graphene

Graphene Key to Growing Two-Dimensional Semiconductor with Extraordinary Properties

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The first-ever growth of two-dimensional gallium nitride using graphene encapsulation could lead to applications in deep ultraviolet lasers, next-generation electronics and sensors.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, genes, estrogen receptor positive breast tumours, Tumours, Mutations, princess margaret cancer centre, University Health Network

Breast cancer researchers look beyond genes to identify more drivers of disease development

Breast cancer researchers have discovered that mutations found outside of genes that accumulate in estrogen receptor positive breast tumours throughout their development act as dominant culprits driving the disease.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Presidential Candidates, Campaign Language, election 2016

Calm or Fiery? Study Says Candidate Language Should Match the Times

Potential voters who see the nation as being in dire economic straits view a presidential candidate as more “presidential” when he or she uses high-intensity, emotional language, a new study suggests.

Medicine

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Cholera, blood type

Study May Explain Why People with Type O Blood More Likely to Die of Cholera

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People with blood type O get sicker from cholera than people of other blood types. Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that cholera toxin activates a key molecule more strongly in people with blood type O than type A, possibly worsening symptoms.

Medicine

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Ophthalmology, Glaucoma, Contact Lens, drug delivery platform

Drug-Dispensing Contact Lens Effectively Lowers Eye Pressure in Pre-Clinical Glaucoma Model

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A contact lens designed to deliver medication gradually to the eye could improve outcomes for patients with conditions requiring treatment with eye drops, which are often imprecise and difficult to self-administer. In a study published online today in Ophthalmology, a team of researchers have shown that a novel contact lens-based system, which uses a strategically placed drug polymer film to deliver medication gradually to the eye, is at least as effective, and possibly more so, as daily latanoprost eye drops in a pre-clinical model for glaucoma.

Medicine

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tuberculosis and HIV co-infection, people with tuberculosis and HIV, Tuberculosis, TB, HIV, Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Mtb, active tuberculosis, active tb, latent tuberculosis, latent TB, TB therapy, HIV and Africa, HIV and TB in Africa, HIV and tuberculosis in Africa, Global Health

NIH Funds Research to Detect Tuberculosis Progression in People with HIV

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Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death worldwide among people infected with HIV. But as yet, no test can reliably show when latent (inactive) TB infections in people with HIV starts progressing to active—and potentially fatal—TB disease. Now, a researcher at Albert Einstein College of Medicine has received a five-year, $3.7 million National Institutes of Health grant to identify biomarkers that signal an increase in activity by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacterium that causes TB, in people with HIV.

Medicine

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Value in Health, Cost Effectiveness In Medical Care, cost effectiveness research, Cardiology, Oncology, Lou Garrison, Mark Hlatky, Peter Yu, Michael Drummond

US Health Care System Begins to Embrace Cost Effectiveness as a Central Component of “Value”

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ISPOR announced today the publication of a series of articles suggesting that the application of cost-effectiveness analysis for health care decision making in the US may be approaching critical mass. This special themed section was published in the July/August 2016 in Value in Health.

Medicine

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Cancer, Chemotheraphy, adjuvant therapies

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 31-Aug-2016 5:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Cell Signaling, Retina, Vision, Pharmacology, Blindness, Macular Degeneration

Case Western Reserve University Researchers Identify New Drug Cocktail to Protect Mouse Retinas, Potentially Avoiding Blindness

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A gentle combination of FDA-approved drugs could protect critical cells in the eye, called photoreceptor cells, against damage caused by bright light.

Medicine

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Mental Health, intergrated healthcare, intermountain medical center, intermountain healthcare, jounral of the american medical association, JAMA, JAMA Internal Medicine, team based providers

Integrating Mental & Physical Health Services Through Primary Care Teams Results in Better Outcomes & Lower Costs, New Study Finds

A major new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that delivering integrated mental and physical healthcare in team-based primary care settings at Intermountain Healthcare results in better clinical outcomes for patients, lower rates of healthcare utilization, and lower costs.







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