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Not Making Enough Money? Check Your Attitude

Holding cynical beliefs about others may have a negative effect on your income according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Study Shows Treatment for Genetically Caused Emphysema Is Effective

A landmark clinical study in the Lancet provides convincing evidence that a frequently overlooked therapy for genetically-caused emphysema is effective and slows the progression of lung disease.

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Penn Nursing Study Cites Federal Policy as Key to Primary Care Access and Nurse Practitioner Workforce Development

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With demand for primary care expected to increase sharply over the next five years– due to passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), population growth and aging – the role of advanced-practice nurses or nurse practitioners (NPs) is also increasing. But a new study illustrates how federal policies influence the NP workforce and practice, and how misalignment of those policies with state mandates can affect workforce supply and patient access to care.

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Primates’ Understanding of Quantities Offers Clues to the Origins of Human Counting

Monkey see, monkey count—almost. New research from the University of Rochester shows that while monkeys don’t have words or symbols for numbers like we do, they do understand the basic logic behind counting—and that can show us how humans first learned to count.

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Protons Hog the Momentum in Neutron-Rich Nuclei

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For the first time, researchers have shown that momentum-hogging protons can exist in nuclei heavier than carbon.

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Study Reveals Wide Variability in Organ Donation Rates Across the United States: Midwest Leads the Nation in Highest Rates of Lifesaving Donations

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More than 123,000 Americans are currently waiting for lifesaving organ transplants, but 21 patients die each day because there aren't enough organs to go around. New research shows wide variation in the number of eligible organ donors whose loved ones consent to organ donation across the country. Donation consent rates are highest in the Midwest and lowest in New York State, according to a study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Kansas Hospital in the new issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Study Suggests Earning a College Degree Before, But Not After, Getting Married Protects Against Obesity

People who earn a college degree before getting married are much less likely to become obese than those who graduate from college after getting married, according to a new study.

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Getting "Inked" May Come with Long-Term Medical Risks, Physicians Warn

In what they believe to be the first survey of its kind in the United States, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have found that as many as 6 percent of adult New Yorkers who get “inked” — in other words, those who get a tattoo — have experienced some form of tattoo-related rash, severe itching or swelling that lasted longer than four months and, in some cases, for many years.

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Ancient DNA May Provide Clues into How Past Environments Affected Ancient Populations

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A new study by anthropologists from The University of Texas at Austin shows for the first time that epigenetic marks on DNA can be detected in a large number of ancient human remains, which may lead to further understanding about the effects of famine and disease in the ancient world.

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Weak Electric Current to the Brain May Improve Thinking in People with Schizophrenia

Lightly stimulating the brain with electricity may improve short-term memory in people with schizophrenia, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.