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Science

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Origin Of Life

SLU Chemist Asks ‘Could Life Begin in Oil?’

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A $597,380 grant from the National Science Foundation will fund SLU scientist Paul Bracher, Ph.D., and his research team as they study what life might look like on other planets - or, here on earth - if it began in oil.

Medicine

Science

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Health And Medicine, Cancer, Science And Technology

Combination of Traditional Chemotherapy, New Drug Kills Rare Cancer Cells in Mice

An experimental drug combined with the traditional chemotherapy drug cisplatin, when used in mice, destroyed a rare form of salivary gland tumor and prevented a recurrence within 300 days, a University of Michigan study found.

Medicine

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Sun Exposure, Skin Cancer, Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute, Circadian Rhythm, Eating

Eating Habits Affect Skin’s Protection Against Sun

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Sunbathers may want to avoid midnight snacks before catching some rays.

Medicine

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Cancer, liquid biopsy, Genetics, genes, Cancer of Unknown Primary, CUP, Precision Medicine

Blood Biopsy Reveals Unique, Targetable Genetic Alterations in Patients with Rare Cancer

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Using fragments of circulating tumor DNA in blood, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers were able to identify theoretically targetable genetic alterations in 66 percent of patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP), a rare disease with seven to 12 cases per 100,000 people each year.

Medicine

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Differentiation, T Cell, gene programs, Embryonic Stem Cells, tran, Epigenetic, Epigenomic, genome topology, Metabolism, Glutamine, alpha-ketoglutarate, ccctc-binding factor, Ctcf

How a Nutrient, Glutamine, Can Control Gene Programs in Cells

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An intracellular metabolite of glutamine regulates cellular differentiation programs by changing the DNA-binding patterns of a transcription factor and by altering genome interactions. Genome context near the binding sites affects whether the binding turns on or turns off gene programs.

Business

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ASCB|EMBO 2017 meeting, Cell Biology, Scientific conference, SPARGO, exhibit floor

The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) Appoints SPARGO, Inc. as Official Exposition and Advertising Sales and Management Firm

In August of 2017, SPARGO, Inc. will assume responsibility for the management of exhibit and sponsorship sales for the American Society for Cell Biology’s 2017 and 2018 ASCB|EMBO Meetings and 2019 and 2020 Annual Meetings. Additionally, SPARGO will sell advertising in ASCB’s three publications and other digital communications.

Science

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UofL Researchers Discover Procedure to Regenerate Dormant Cone Cells, Potentially to Improve Vision in Retinitis Pigmentosa

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Researchers have discovered a way to revitalize cone receptors that have deteriorated as a result of retinitis pigmentosa. Working with animal models, researchers at UofL discovered that replenishing glucose under the retina and transplanting healthy rod stem cells into the retina restore function of the cones.

Medicine

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Bone Marrow, stem, Stem Cell, Blood Disease, Blood Disorders, Lymphoma, Myeloma

Stem Cell Transplant Program Celebrates First Year

The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center began helping New Mexicans with blood disorders a little more than one year ago. It is the state’s only bone marrow transplant program. The program offers treatment choices for people with lymphoma and myeloma and will expand to help people with other blood disorders.

Medicine

Science

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Wilms, Wilms Tumor, Genetic Mutation

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Aug-2017 11:05 AM EDT

Medicine

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T Cell, Cancer, Ligand Receptor Binding, Vanderbilt University, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Nashville

Cancer-Fighting T Cells Are Smarter, Stronger Than Experts Thought

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It takes a minuscule amount of force to make T cells behave in the lab as they behave in the body. That finding is a leap in cancer therapy research.







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