Curated News: National Cancer Institute (NCI)

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Newswise: Roswell Park’s Dr. Pawel Kalinski to Lead $14.5M NCI-Funded Immunotherapy Effort
Released: 31-Mar-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Roswell Park’s Dr. Pawel Kalinski to Lead $14.5M NCI-Funded Immunotherapy Effort
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

A team led by Pawel Kalinski, MD, PhD, of Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center has earned a five-year, $14.54 million award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to expand a promising immunotherapy platform. Funded through the NCI’s Program Project Grant program, this prestigious five-year grant will fund five clinical trials, all focused on a strategy for making some of the most common immunotherapies work for more cancer patients.

Newswise: Experiments in Mice And Human Cells Shed Light On Best Way to Deliver Nanoparticle Therapy For Cancer
Released: 26-Mar-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Experiments in Mice And Human Cells Shed Light On Best Way to Deliver Nanoparticle Therapy For Cancer
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers in the cancer nanomedicine community debate whether use of tiny structures, called nanoparticles, can best deliver drug therapy to tumors passively — allowing the nanoparticles to diffuse into tumors and become held in place, or actively — adding a targeted anti-cancer molecule to bind to specific cancer cell receptors and, in theory, keep the nanoparticle in the tumor longer. Now, new research on human and mouse tumors in mice by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center suggests the question is even more complicated.

Newswise: Supercomputer Helps Benchmark Cancer Immunotherapy Tool
Released: 24-Mar-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Supercomputer Helps Benchmark Cancer Immunotherapy Tool
University of California San Diego

With an estimated 1.7 million new cases and 600,000 deaths during 2017 in the U.S. alone, cancer remains a critical healthcare challenge. Researchers used the Comet supercomputer at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to evaluate their new molecular docking tool which aims to improve immunotherapy outcomes by identifying more effective personalized treatments.

Newswise: Mimicking Cancer’s Evasive Tactics, Microparticles Show Promise Against Transplant Rejection
8-Mar-2020 9:00 PM EDT
Mimicking Cancer’s Evasive Tactics, Microparticles Show Promise Against Transplant Rejection
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Inspired by a tactic cancer cells use to evade the immune system, University of Pittsburgh researchers have engineered tiny particles that can trick the body into accepting transplanted tissue as its own, while leaving the immune system intact.

Newswise: Statins Starve Cancer Cells to Death
Released: 12-Mar-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Statins Starve Cancer Cells to Death
Johns Hopkins Medicine

More than 35 million Americans take statin drugs daily to lower their blood cholesterol levels. Now, in experiments with human cells in the laboratory, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have added to growing evidence that the ubiquitous drug may kill cancer cells and have uncovered clues to how they do it.

Newswise: Cancerous tumors, surrounding cells illuminated by new imaging agent
Released: 10-Mar-2020 5:45 PM EDT
Cancerous tumors, surrounding cells illuminated by new imaging agent
Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a new imaging agent that could let doctors identify not only multiple types of tumors but the surrounding normal cells that the cancer takes over and uses as a shield to protect itself from attempts to destroy it.

Newswise: Could cancer immunotherapy success depend on gut bacteria?
Released: 6-Mar-2020 3:40 PM EST
Could cancer immunotherapy success depend on gut bacteria?
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Gut bacteria can penetrate tumor cells and boost the effectiveness of an experimental immunotherapy that targets the CD47 protein.

Newswise: Using new genomic technology, UCI researchers discover breast cancer cells shift their metabolic strategy in order to metastasize
Released: 6-Mar-2020 1:05 PM EST
Using new genomic technology, UCI researchers discover breast cancer cells shift their metabolic strategy in order to metastasize
University of California, Irvine

New discovery in breast cancer could lead to better strategies for preventing the spread of cancer cells to other organs in the body, effectively reducing mortality in breast cancer patients. According to a study, published today in Nature Cell Biology, breast cancer cells shift their metabolic strategy in order to metastasize. Instead of cycling sugar (glucose) for energy, they preferentially use mitochondrial metabolism.

4-Mar-2020 6:05 PM EST
Combination of engineered cold sore virus and inhibitor drugs could destroy brain tumors
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Researchers who discovered that an engineered cold sore virus could help destroy brain tumors from the inside out have determined a one-two punch might be the key to finish them off. This virotherapy could make a class of investigational cancer drugs more effective, according to investigators at UTHealth.


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