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Newswise: New research may explain why, despite “the munchies”, frequent cannabis users are leaner than non-users
Released: 1-Jun-2023 4:05 PM EDT
New research may explain why, despite “the munchies”, frequent cannabis users are leaner than non-users
University of California, Irvine

Despite getting “the munchies”, people who frequently use cannabis are leaner and less prone to diabetes than those who don’t. University of California, Irvine researchers have now uncovered a possible explanation for this paradox – and it’s not good news.

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This news release is embargoed until 2-Jun-2023 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Jun-2023 8:00 AM EDT

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Newswise: Do people who use fentanyl test strips practice more overdose risk reduction behaviors than people who don't?
Released: 31-May-2023 4:20 PM EDT
Do people who use fentanyl test strips practice more overdose risk reduction behaviors than people who don't?
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Leveraging the HEALing Communities Study infrastructure, researchers are testing whether there is an association between fentanyl test strip use and overdose risk reduction behaviors among people who use drugs over a 28-day observation period. The Stay Safe Study will be in Kentucky, Ohio and New York.

Released: 18-May-2023 6:20 PM EDT
Is vaping a new gateway into further substance use? New national study shows adolescent vapers much likelier to use cannabis and binge drink
Taylor & Francis

A new study of more than 50,000 US adolescents across the country indicates that vaping nicotine is strongly linked with an increased likelihood of high levels use of binge drinking and cannabis usage.

   
Newswise:Video Embedded even-worms-get-the-munchies
VIDEO
19-Mar-2023 11:05 AM EDT
Even Worms Get the Munchies
University of Oregon

A study, led by University of Oregon neuroscientist Shawn Lockery, points to worms as a useful tool for understanding more about the many roles that cannabinoids naturally play in the body. And it could help researchers develop better drugs that target this system.

   
Released: 18-Apr-2023 8:30 PM EDT
School prevalence of stimulant therapy for ADHD associated with higher rates of prescription stimulant misuse among teens
NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Researchers have identified a strong association between prevalence of prescription stimulant therapy for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and rates of prescription stimulant misuse (taken in a way other than as directed by a clinician) by students in middle and high schools.

14-Apr-2023 11:00 AM EDT
In some US schools, 1 in 4 students report misusing prescription stimulants
University of Michigan

U.S. middle and high schools with the most students taking prescription stimulants to treat ADHD also had, overall, the highest percentage of students who misused prescription stimulants within the past year.

Released: 3-Apr-2023 12:05 PM EDT
E-health reduces patient pain, opioids in clinical study
Washington State University

An online “e-health” program helped more people with chronic pain reduce their opioid medications and pain intensity than a control group that had only regular treatment in a recent clinical study.

20-Mar-2023 1:20 PM EDT
Multiple substance use disorders may share inherited genetic signature
Washington University in St. Louis

New research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis identifies a common genetic signature that may increase a person's risk of developing substance use disorders. The work eventually could lead to universal therapies to treat multiple substance use disorders and potentially help people diagnosed with more than one.

Newswise: Cannabis use in adolescent years may create reproductive complications in women, according to a UC Irvine study
Released: 21-Mar-2023 1:00 PM EDT
Cannabis use in adolescent years may create reproductive complications in women, according to a UC Irvine study
University of California, Irvine

In a new study, University of California, Irvine researchers found that exposure to the compound tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a component of cannabis, at a young age could lead to depleted ovarian follicles and matured eggs in adulthood by nearly 50 percent.

Released: 20-Mar-2023 3:45 PM EDT
Stigma-coping intervention empowers people with HIV and drug use to engage in health, substance use care
Boston University School of Medicine

A new study from Boston University Chobanian & Avedisian School of Medicine has found that a brief stigma intervention that specifically targets people with HIV who inject drugs was effective in increasing engagement in substance use care as well as improving their ART adherence.

Newswise: Cocaine Use Disorder Alters Gene Networks of Neuroinflammation and Neurotransmission in Humans
6-Feb-2023 3:50 PM EST
Cocaine Use Disorder Alters Gene Networks of Neuroinflammation and Neurotransmission in Humans
Mount Sinai Health System

Analysis reveals similar changes in the brain’s functioning in both humans and mouse models

Newswise: Study First to Show Statewide Cannabis-related Deaths in Florida
Released: 9-Feb-2023 8:30 AM EST
Study First to Show Statewide Cannabis-related Deaths in Florida
Florida Atlantic University

There has been a 1,107.01 percent increase in the number of people with medical cannabis cards in Florida (2018 to Jan. 27). One key reason is because many people believe cannabinoids – plant derived, medicinal, and synthetic or chemically engineered – are safe to use. A study shows that 386 people died in Florida as a result of cannabis use; of these, 258 cases were caused by synthetic cannabis. Nearly 88 percent were men; 28 percent of deaths were in those ages 45 to 54, compared to 9 percent in those ages 8 to 24. Nearly 99 percent of individuals using cannabis and synthetic cannabis died from accidents.

Released: 20-Jan-2023 5:50 PM EST
Overdose deaths involving buprenorphine did not proportionally increase with new flexibilities in prescribing
NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

The proportion of opioid overdose deaths involving buprenorphine, a medication used to treat opioid use disorder, did not increase in the months after prescribing flexibilities were put in place during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study.

Newswise: Cannabis-Related Emergency Department Visits among Older Adults on the Rise
Released: 9-Jan-2023 2:10 PM EST
Cannabis-Related Emergency Department Visits among Older Adults on the Rise
UC San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine study shows cannabis-related emergency department visits among older adults are on the rise with high risk for adverse effects of cannabis use for ages 65 and older.

Released: 22-Dec-2022 7:40 PM EST
In some US zip codes, young men face more risk of firearm death than those deployed in recent wars
Brown University

The risk of firearm death in the U.S. is on the rise: in 2020, firearms became the leading cause of death for children, adolescents and young adults. Yet the risk is far from even — young men in some U.S. zip codes face disproportionately higher risks of firearm-related injuries and deaths.

27-Nov-2022 5:00 PM EST
Buprenorphine, Not Methadone, May Be Safer Treatment for Opioid-Use Disorder During Pregnancy
Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University

Researchers found that using buprenorphine to treat opioid-use disorder during pregnancy may result in better outcomes for the baby than methadone.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 3:10 PM EST
Why housing alone is not enough for some homeless moms
Ohio State University

Giving some homeless mothers with young children a place to live may do little to help them if it is not combined with support services, a first-of-its-kind study showed.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 8:00 PM EST
At overdose events, arrests by police and combative behavior are rare, study finds
Brown University

While police officers are often dispatched alongside other first responders when drug overdoses are reported, an analysis of hundreds of overdose events in one Rhode Island city found that there were scant incidents that actually needed involvement from law enforcement.

   
Newswise: Reduced Nicotine Cigarettes Result in Less Smoking in Anxious, Depressed Smokers
31-Oct-2022 4:40 PM EDT
Reduced Nicotine Cigarettes Result in Less Smoking in Anxious, Depressed Smokers
Penn State College of Medicine

Lowering the amount of nicotine in cigarettes to non-addictive levels may reduce smoking without worsening mental health in smokers with mood or anxiety disorders, according to College of Medicine researchers.

Released: 2-Nov-2022 12:35 PM EDT
Inequality Linked to Differences in Kids’ Brain Connections
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Growing up in a socioeconomically disadvantaged household may have lasting effects on children’s brain development, a large new study suggests. Compared with children from more-advantaged homes and neighborhoods, children from families with fewer resources have different patterns of connections between their brain’s many regions and networks by the time they’re in upper grades of elementary school. One socioeconomic factor stood out in the study as more important to brain development than others: the number of years of education a child’s parents have.

Released: 24-Oct-2022 8:05 PM EDT
Video Gaming May Be Associated with Better Cognitive Performance in Children
NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

A study of nearly 2,000 children found that those who reported playing video games for three hours per day or more performed better on cognitive skills tests involving impulse control and working memory compared to children who had never played video games.

   
Newswise: Scientists ID pathway that triggers mice to scratch when they see others do the same
Released: 4-Oct-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Scientists ID pathway that triggers mice to scratch when they see others do the same
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a pathway in the brains of mice that is activated when the animals see other mice scratching, but that pathway does not run through the visual cortex.

29-Sep-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers seek to unravel the mystery of susceptibility to drug addiction
Clemson University

Clemson geneticists Trudy Mackay and Robert Anholt will work to discover why some people become addicted to drugs while others don't.

Newswise: Gut bacteria may contribute to susceptibility to HIV infection, UCLA-led research suggests
Released: 29-Sep-2022 8:05 PM EDT
Gut bacteria may contribute to susceptibility to HIV infection, UCLA-led research suggests
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

New UCLA-led research suggests certain gut bacteria -- including one that is essential for a healthy gut microbiome – differ between people who go on to acquire HIV infection compared to those who have not become infected. The findings, published in the peer-reviewed journal eBioMedicine, suggest that the gut microbiome could contribute to one’s risk for HIV infection, said study lead Dr.

Released: 24-Aug-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Johns Hopkins receives $1.6 million NIH grant to commercialize innovations to treat substance use disorders
Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School faculty, along with School of Medicine colleagues, will create a cutting-edge pathway for substance use disorder researchers to develop new treatment options thanks to a $1.6 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

   
4-Aug-2022 6:05 PM EDT
UCLA researchers use artificial intelligence tools to speed critical information on drug overdose deaths
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Fast data processing of overdose deaths, which have increased in recent years, is crucial to developing a rapid public health response. But the system now in place lacks precision and takes months. To correct that, UCLA researchers have developed an automated process that reduces data collection to a few weeks.

   
Newswise: Neuroscientists to Study Effects of Marijuana Use During Adolescence with $2M NIH Grant
Released: 5-Jul-2022 12:10 PM EDT
Neuroscientists to Study Effects of Marijuana Use During Adolescence with $2M NIH Grant
Indiana University

Over $2 million from the NIH's National Institute on Drug Abuse will help neuroscientists in the IU Gill Center for Biomolecular Science research the impact of cannabis use during adolescence.

   
Newswise: Smoking-Cessation Program That Targets Cancer Patients Effective
Released: 11-May-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Smoking-Cessation Program That Targets Cancer Patients Effective
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a way to help more patients who want to stop smoking. The successful strategy involves using electronic medical records to help identify smokers when they visit their oncologists and offering help with quitting during such visits.

9-May-2022 12:45 PM EDT
Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy Not Linked to Epilepsy in Children
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study suggests that antidepressant use by mothers during the first trimester of pregnancy does not increase the chances of epilepsy and seizures in babies. The research is published in the May 11, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 15-Mar-2022 9:55 AM EDT
Study of Non-Cancer Pain Patient Data Finds State Opioid Prescription Laws Don’t Influence Prescribing Practices
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Pain experts and patient advocates had expressed concern that these laws may restrict access to opioid treatment for people with chronic pain without substituting effective non-opioid alternatives.

Newswise: Psilocybin Treatment for Major Depression Effective for Up to a Year for Most Patients, Study Shows
Released: 15-Feb-2022 9:00 AM EST
Psilocybin Treatment for Major Depression Effective for Up to a Year for Most Patients, Study Shows
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a follow-up study, researchers report that the substantial antidepressant effects of psilocybin-assisted therapy, given with supportive psychotherapy, may last at least a year for some patients.

Released: 12-Jan-2022 3:05 PM EST
Removing brain cells linked to wakefulness and addiction may lessen symptoms of opioid withdrawal
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A study in mice led by UCLA researchers shows that removing chemical messengers in the brain that are involved in both wakefulness and addiction may make withdrawal from opioids easier and help prevent relapse.

Newswise: UTEP to Work on Solutions to Reduce Drug Use-Related HIV in the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez Border
Released: 10-Dec-2021 3:00 PM EST
UTEP to Work on Solutions to Reduce Drug Use-Related HIV in the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez Border
University of Texas at El Paso

The University of Texas at El Paso will develop a sustainable public health intervention to suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in people who use drugs in the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez border region. The initiative will be funded by a $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

Newswise: E-cigs with cigarette-like nicotine delivery may help cigarette smokers quit
Released: 8-Dec-2021 8:05 AM EST
E-cigs with cigarette-like nicotine delivery may help cigarette smokers quit
Penn State College of Medicine

Electronic cigarettes with cigarette-like nicotine delivery may help some people stop smoking cigarettes, according to a new study by Penn State College of Medicine and Virginia Commonwealth University researchers.

Newswise: MSHS-Newsroom-Prenatal-2col-770x420.jpg
11-Nov-2021 10:15 AM EST
Cannabis Use During Pregnancy Impacts the Placenta and May Affect Subsequent Child Development
Mount Sinai Health System

Women who use cannabis during pregnancy, potentially to relieve stress and anxiety, may inadvertently predispose their children to stress susceptibility and anxiety, according to a study conducted by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the City University of New York published Monday, November 15, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS).

Newswise: AI_Opioids_JJ102513-600x400.jpg
Released: 10-Nov-2021 3:10 PM EST
New AI tool will predict patients at high risk for opioid use disorder and overdose
University of Florida

University of Florida researchers are developing a new artificial intelligence tool that will help clinicians identify patients at high risk for opioid use disorder and overdose.

Newswise: Screen%20Shot%202018-04-03%20at%202.47.02%20PM.png
28-Oct-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Hepatitis C Infections Among Pregnant People Increased Substantially Between 2009 and 2019
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

The leading cause of HCV in the U.S. is injection drug use as a result of opioid use disorder (OUD), which has seen a rise in most populations, including pregnant people, in recent years. HCV rates have also risen. Between 2009 and 2019, the overall rate per 1,000 live births of HCV in pregnant people increased from 1.8 to 5.1.

Newswise: Case Western Reserve University receives $16M federal grant to launch major research center on substance use and HIV
Released: 25-Oct-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Case Western Reserve University receives $16M federal grant to launch major research center on substance use and HIV
Case Western Reserve University

Thanks to a new $16 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health, Case Western Reserve University is launching a multi-institutional research effort dedicated to deepening understanding of the relationship between substance use and HIV.

Newswise: Newsroom%20Marisol%2010%2018%20Cubensis%20Cluster%20Hand.jpg
Released: 18-Oct-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Medicine Receives First Federal Grant for Psychedelic Treatment Research in 50 years
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to explore the potential impacts of psilocybin on tobacco addiction.

5-Oct-2021 4:55 PM EDT
New Case Western Reserve University, National Institute on Drug Abuse study finds people with substance-use disorders may be at higher risk for SARS-CoV-2 breakthrough infections
Case Western Reserve University

An analysis of electronic health records of nearly 580,000 fully vaccinated people in the United States found that while the risk of SARS-CoV-2 breakthrough infection among those with substance-use disorders was low overall, it was higher for people who misuse substances such as alcohol, tobacco, marijuana and opioids.

Released: 5-Oct-2021 3:35 PM EDT
The Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU Langone Health Joins National Study Exploring How Environmental Stressors Impact Child Development
NYU Langone Health

Research will further shed light on the effects of environmental stressors on the developing brain--beginning before birth and following through the first ten years of life.

Released: 5-Oct-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Professor collaborates on $3.1 million grant to address HIV in African American/Black and Latinx youth
Binghamton University, State University of New York

A new $3.1-million, four-year grant co-led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York could help African American and Latinx youth living with HIV.

   
Released: 22-Sep-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Deaths with drugs as contributing factor rising dramatically
Ohio State University

While many people focus on the role of drugs in overdose deaths, a recent study shows that deaths where drugs were a contributing cause are also on the rise.

Released: 9-Sep-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Social support reduces genetic risk factors that can lead to alcohol use problems
Arizona State University (ASU)

A new study from the Arizona State University Department of Psychology shows that the combination of genetic predisposition to alcohol use disorders and personality type can lead to problematic drinking behaviors. Having strong social support from friends was identified as protective against excessive drinking. The work was published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology.

   
Released: 31-Aug-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Racial Discrimination Linked to Drinking Through Mental Health in Black College Students
Arizona State University (ASU)

A new study from Arizona State University and Virginia Commonwealth University examined the pathways that contribute to and protect against alcohol use problems in Black American college students. Racial discrimination led to depressive symptoms and to problem alcohol consumption. Positive feelings about being a Black American were associated with a weaker link between discrimination, mental health and alcohol use. The study was published in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors.

   
18-Aug-2021 3:50 PM EDT
How Adolescents Used Drugs During the COVID-19 Pandemic
UC San Diego Health

Among adolescents ages 10 to 14 in the U.S, the overall rate of drug use remained relatively stable in the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, one change was a decreased use of alcohol, but an increased use of nicotine and misuse of prescription drugs.

Released: 19-Aug-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Study shows uptick in U.S. alcohol beverage sales during COVID-19 pandemic
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

During the COVID-19 pandemic months of March 2020 to September 2020, U.S. alcohol retail store sales increased compared to usual trends while food services and drinking places sales decreased markedly during the same period, according to a new study at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

Released: 4-Aug-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Scaling the Model of Care for Patients with Opioid Use Disorder
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Data show that concurrent with the opioid overdose crisis, there has been an increase in hospitalizations of people with opioid use disorder (OUD). One in ten of these hospitalized medical or surgical patients have comorbid opioid-related diagnoses.


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