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Article ID: 706747

Cost of living almost doubles for young adults who fly the nest and rent on their own: New research examines the minimum income requirements of 20-somethings who still live at home

Loughborough University

The growing number of families in which adults aged 20 to 30 live with their parents are having to negotiate new ways of pooling their resources, according to pioneering research investigating how these families live and the costs that they face.

Released:
18-Jan-2019 12:10 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 706702

‘Dirty John’ and a Safety Plan for Domestic Violence

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Today we have a good understanding of the pattern of dangerous behaviors abusive men use to manipulate their partners. However, most women, their friends, and their family members do not have access to safety information. Dirty John presents an opportunity for women in abusive relationships to learn more about developing a personalized, practical safety plan for when in danger.

Released:
17-Jan-2019 3:05 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 705926

Work-Family Conflict Hits Home

University of Houston

Researchers have long known that sick children can affect a company's bottom line, as employees are distracted or have to take time off to care for their children. Far less is known about the impact a parent's work life has on their children's health.

Released:
2-Jan-2019 3:05 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Dec-2018 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 705821

Smelling in Tiny Houses: How Ciliary Electric Currents Keep Olfaction Reliable

Monell Chemical Senses Center

Scientists have used a combination of mathematical modeling, electrophysiology, and computer simulations to explain how cells communicate effectively in highly constricted spaces such as the olfactory cilia. The findings will inform future studies of cellular signaling in the olfactory system and other confined spaces of the nervous system.

Released:
26-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 705286

An Energy-Efficient Way to Stay Warm: Sew High-Tech Heating Patches to Your Clothes

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes – while significantly reducing your electric bill and carbon footprint? Engineers at Rutgers and Oregon State University have found a cost-effective way to make thin, durable heating patches by using intense pulses of light to fuse tiny silver wires with polyester. Their heating performance is nearly 70 percent higher than similar patches created by other researchers, according to a Rutgers-led study in Scientific Reports.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 5:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 704912

Emergency financial assistance reduces homeless shelter entry and violent crime

University of Notre Dame

A new study conducted by researchers at the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities at Notre Dame shows that emergency financial assistance for people facing homelessness not only reduces shelter entry, but also reduces criminal behavior.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 3:05 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 704802

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Professor Nancy Glass Receives $2.2 Million to Prevent and Respond to Sexual and Domestic Violence

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Two new grants totaling $2.2 million will fund Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Professor Nancy Glass, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, in the development of nationally accessible, culturally diverse, and age-appropriate resources to help protect survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault across the lifespan.

Released:
3-Dec-2018 1:05 PM EST

Article ID: 703823

Women Favor Daughters, Men Favor Sons Despite Socioeconomic Status

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A Rutgers-led experimental study found that women prefer and invest more in daughters, while men favor and invest more in their sons. The study of gender biases appears in the journal Scientific Reports.

Released:
13-Nov-2018 4:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences


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