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Pro-Marijuana ‘Tweets’ Are Sky-High on Twitter

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Analyzing every marijuana-related Twitter message sent during a one-month period in early 2014, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have found that the “Twitterverse” is a pot-friendly place. In that time, more than 7 million tweets referenced marijuana, with 15 times as many pro-pot tweets sent as anti-pot tweets.

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Cone Snail Venom Holds Promise for Medical Treatments for Cancer and Addiction

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While considered a delicacy in some parts of the world, snails have found a more intriguing use to scientists and the medical profession offering a plethora of research possibilities.

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TSRI Scientists Design Nicotine Vaccine that Provokes Robust Immune Response

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A team from The Scripps Research Institute has designed a more effective nicotine vaccine and proven that the structures of molecules used in vaccines is critical.

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Women, Quitting Smoking for New Years'? Time It with Your Period!

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“Our data reveal that incontrollable urges to smoke are stronger at the beginning of the follicular phase that begins after menstruation. Hormonal decreases of oestrogen and progesterone possibly deepen the withdrawal syndrome and increase activity of neural circuits associated with craving” - Adrianna Mendrek

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Cocaine, Amphetamine Users More Likely to Take Their Own Lives

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Stimulants use such as cocaine and amphetamine is associated with a nearly two-fold greater likelihood of suicidal behaviour amongst people who inject drugs, say researchers at the University of Montreal and the CHUM Research Centre. Drug addiction had already been identified as a major risk factor for suicide, and it is in fact the cause of ten percent of deaths among drug users. The data from this groundbreaking study could help develop and evaluate more appropriate suicide prevention efforts in this highly vulnerable population.

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Texas Tech Grad Goes From Prison Jumpsuit to Cap and Gown

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At age 50, after a lifetime of drug abuse and jailtime, Leo Pereida is graduating from college. He credits his turnaround to his faith in God.

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Teen Smoking: Deeper Analysis of Statistics Needed, Study Finds

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When it comes to measuring teen smoking, many public health agencies rely too heavily on reports of monthly cigarette use, a broad statistic that makes it difficult to draw conclusions about current habits and historical trends, a new study finds.

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E-Cigarettes Less Addictive Than Cigarettes

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E-cigarettes appear to be less addictive than cigarettes in former smokers and this could help improve understanding of how various nicotine delivery devices lead to dependence, according to researchers.

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People with Opioid Dependence in Recovery Show 'Re-Regulation' of Reward Systems

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Within a few months after drug withdrawal, patients in recovery from dependence on prescription pain medications may show signs that the body's natural reward systems are normalizing, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

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Primary Care Doctors Report Prescribing Fewer Opioids for Pain

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Nine in 10 primary care physicians say that prescription drug abuse is a moderate or big problem in their communities and nearly half say they are less likely to prescribe opioids to treat pain compared to a year ago, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.