Feature Channels

Kidney Disease

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 4-Sep-2014 5:00 PM EDT

Medicine

Channels:

Calcium Buildup in Coronary Arteries Predicts Heart Disease Risk in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

• Calcium build-up in the coronary artery walls was more useful for correctly predicting kidney disease patients’ risk of heart disease than other measures of atherosclerosis such as thickness of the carotid artery walls and narrowing of the arteries in the legs.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Measuring Calcium Buildup Is a Better Way to Predict Heart Disease in Those with Chronic Kidney Disease

Calcium buildup in the coronary arteries of chronic kidney disease patients may be a strong indicator of heart disease risk, according to a new study released in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health assert that coronary calcium outperforms two other commonly used measures of subclinical atherosclerosis in predicting the risk of heart disease among individuals with kidney disease.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

American Society of Nephrology: NYT Article Missing Key Facts About Kidney Disease

The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) congratulates The New York Times for calling attention to transplant tourism and organ trafficking. Yet ASN is disappointed with the article’s characterization of dialysis and failure to address opportunities to improve this lifesaving therapy. ASN urges Congress to pass legislation to help transplant recipients and living donors.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Gender Disparities Uncovered in Desire to Receive Living Donor Kidney Transplants

• In 2 predominantly black dialysis clinics, women were less likely to want to undergo living donor kidney transplantation compared with men, despite being more likely than men to receive unsolicited offers for kidney transplants from family and friends. • Women were also less likely to have been evaluated for a kidney transplant.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Potential Drug Therapy for Kidney Stones Identified in Mouse Study

Surface_of_a_kidney_stone_with_tetragonal_crystals_of_Weddellite_calcium_oxalate_dihydrate._REM_211.jpg

New research in mice suggests that a class of drugs approved to treat leukemia and epilepsy also may be effective against kidney stones.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

New Test Predicts Individual’s Risk of a Second Kidney Stone

A new tool uses 11 questions to accurately calculate the probability that a patient will have another symptomatic kidney stone at 2, 5, or 10 years after the first stone.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Southern-Style Eating Increases Risk of Death for Kidney Disease Patients

Consuming fried foods and sugar-sweetened beverages is linked to a 50 percent increase in risk of death, according to a new study in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Depressive Symptoms and Pain May Affect Adherence and Health Outcomes in Dialysis Patients

Among patients on chronic hemodialysis, those with depressive symptoms and pain were more likely to abbreviate or miss dialysis sessions, visit the emergency department, and be hospitalized. Depressive symptoms were also linked with an increased risk of premature death.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Symposium Focuses on Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease

There's a "critical need" for research and innovative new strategies to address health disparities and to improve health outcomes across all groups of people with cardiovascular disease, according to a special symposium feature in the August issue of The American Journal of Medical Sciences (AJMS), official journal of the Southern Society for Clinical Investigation (SSCI). The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

View | Comment