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Science

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Antarcica, Ice Sheet, Climate Change

New Study Validates East Antarctic Ice Sheet Should Remain Stable Even if Western Ice Sheet Melts

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A new study from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis validates that the central core of the East Antarctic ice sheet should remain stable even if the West Antarctic ice sheet melts.

Medicine

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Sun Exposure, Skin Cancer, Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute, Circadian Rhythm, Eating

Eating Habits Affect Skin’s Protection Against Sun

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Sunbathers may want to avoid midnight snacks before catching some rays.

Science

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Phytoremediation, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Ames, University of Washington, Trichloroethylene, TCE, poplar tree

Probiotics Help Poplar Trees Clean Up Toxins in Superfund Sites

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Biologists conducted the first large-scale experiment on a Superfund site using poplar trees fortified with a probiotic — or natural microbe — to clean up groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene, or TCE.

Medicine

Science

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Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research, stem cell metabolism, Metabolism, Metabolic Activity, Hair Loss, hair loss drugs, hair stem cells, Hair Regeneration, Genetics, Drug Discovery, Drug Discovery And Development

UCLA Scientists Identify a New Way to Activate Stem Cells to Make Hair Grow

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UCLA researchers have discovered a new way to activate the stem cells in the hair follicle to make hair grow. The research, led by scientists Heather Christofk and William Lowry, may lead to new drugs that could promote hair growth for people with baldness or alopecia, which is hair loss associated with such factors as hormonal imbalance, stress, aging or chemotherapy treatment.

Medicine

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Internet, Depression, Instagram, UVM, Photo, Public Health, Machine Learning, Mental Illness, Social Media, Disease Diagnosis

When You’re Blue, So Are Your Instagram Photos

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A new study shows that Instagram photos can be examined by a computer to successfully detect depressed people. The computer results are more reliable (70%) than the diagnostic success rate (42%) of general-practice doctors. The approach promises a new method for early screening of mental health problems through social media.

Science

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Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Universe, Universe Expanding

Map of the Cosmos ‘Sees’ the Dark Universe

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Scientists have created the most accurate map of the structure of dark matter in the Universe, supporting the theory that dark energy and dark matter make up most of the Universe.

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Ancient Dna, Ancient Greece, Ancient Greeks, Minoan, Mycenaeans, Bronze Age

The First Civilizations of Greece are Revealing Their Stories to Science

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A new analysis of genome sequences from the ancient Minoans and Mycenaeans by HHMI investigator and colleagues offers insight into the origins of these Bronze Age cultures.

Science

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Birds, Climate Change, habitat loss, Frank La Sorte

Climate Change, Habitat Loss Threaten Eastern Forest Birds

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Human-caused habitat loss looms as the greatest threat to some North American breeding birds over the next few decades. The problem will be most severe on their wintering grounds, according to a new study published in the journal Global Change Biology.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Psychology, Child Development, Cognition

Even Babies Can Tell Who's the Boss, UW Research Says

University of Washington researchers have found that the trait of social dominance, and the dynamics surrounding it, may be so naturally ingrained that toddlers as young as 17 months old not only can perceive who is dominant, but also anticipate that the dominant person will receive more rewards.

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Milky Way's Origins Are Not What They Seem

In a first-of-its-kind analysis, Northwestern University astrophysicists have discovered that up to half of the matter in our Milky Way galaxy may come from distant galaxies. As a result, each one of us may be made in part from extragalactic matter. Using supercomputer simulations, the researchers found an unexpected mode for how galaxies acquired matter: intergalactic transfer. Supernova explosions eject copious amounts of gas from galaxies, causing atoms to be transported from one galaxy to another via powerful galactic winds.







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