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Neuroscience, Brain, Memory & Cognitive Processes, Hippocampus, Reward-based learning, place cells

The Brain Uses Backward Instant Replays to Remember Important Travel Routes

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Neuroscientists believe they have figured out how rats solve certain navigational problems. If there’s a “reward” at the end of the trip, specialized neurons in the hippocampus of the brain “replay” the route taken to get it, but backward. And the greater the reward, the more often the rats’ brains replay it.

Science

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Anthropology, archealogy, Arts and Culture , History

One of the Most Significant Etruscan Discoveries in Decades Names Female Goddess Uni

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Archaeologists translating a very rare inscription on an ancient Etruscan temple stone have discovered the name Uni -- an important female goddess.

Science

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Earth Science, marine and freshwater biology, Oceanography

Darwin's Theory About 'Impassable' Marine Barrier Holds True for Coral Larvae in the Pacific

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MIAMI--An international team of scientists used a state-of-the-art computer model, a high-powered supercomputer, and five billion 'virtual' coral larvae to test Charles Darwin's 1880 hypothesis that marine species cannot cross the Eastern Pacific's "impassable" marine barrier. The team, which included University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Associate Professor Claire Paris, found that Darwin's theory still hold true today even under extreme El Niño conditions known to speed up ocean currents.

Science

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Earth Science, Evolution, Palentology

New Tiny Species of Extinct Australian Marsupial Lion Named After Sir David Attenborough

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The fossil remains of a new tiny species of marsupial lion which prowled the lush rainforests of northern Australia about 18 million years ago have been unearthed in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of remote north-western Queensland.

Science

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Evolution, genes, evolutionary development, cylcopism, Beetles, etymology, evodevo, Genetics, Development, Insects

'Cyclops' Beetles Hint at Solution to 'Chicken-and-Egg' Problem in Novel Trait Evolution

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Beetles with cyclops eyes have given Indiana University scientists insight into how new traits may evolve through the recruitment of existing genes -- even if these genes are already carrying out critical functions.

Medicine

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Biodiversity, Biology, Ecology and Environment, Forestry

Logged Rainforests Can Be an 'Ark' for Mammals, Extensive Study Shows

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Research reveals that large areas of 'degraded' forest in Southeast Asia can play an important role in conserving mammal diversity.

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University of Washington Paleontologists Discover Major T. Rex Fossil

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Paleontologists with the University of Washington's Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture have discovered a Tyrannosaurus rex, including a very complete skull. The find, which paleontologists estimate to be about 20 percent of the animal, includes vertebrae, ribs, hips and lower jaw bones.

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Anthropology research, Astrophyics, Dinosaur

Fossil Reveals Ostrich Relatives Once Lived in North America

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New research reveals that 50-million-year-old bird fossil specimens, some of which are on display in the Museum’s special exhibition Dinosaurs Among Us, are from a previously unknown relative of the modern-day ostrich.

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University of Washington, Coral Reef, Coral Reefs, coral reef conservation, Coral Ecosystems, Coral Reef Fish, Coral Ecology, Fish Ecology, Oceanography, Marine Ecology, Bahamas

Big Fish — and Their Pee — Are Key Parts of Coral Reef Ecosystems

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Large, carnivorous fish excrete almost half of the key nutrients, phosphorus and nitrogen, that are essential for the survival of coral reefs.

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Earth Science, Evolution, Nature, Paleontology

Elbows of Extinct Marsupial Lion Suggest Unique Hunting Style

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Scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Málaga have proposed that the long extinct marsupial lion hunted in a very unique way - by using its teeth to hold prey before dispatching them with its huge claws.

Medicine

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Preventive Medicine, cardiovascuar disease, sedentary behavior, Sedentary Lifestyle, Heart Disease, American Heart Association, Diabetes, Stroke, University of Alabama at Birmingham

‘Sit Less, Move More’ — Research Shows Sedentary Behavior Is Associated with Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality in Adults

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Sedentary behavior — even among physically active people — may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and more.

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The Most Complete Catalog of Proteins in King Cobra Venom Yet

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Seven milliliters of a king cobra’s venom can kill 20 people. But what exactly is in the snake’s venom? Researchers have pursued that question for decades.

Science

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fifth force of nature, Subatomic Particle, Dark Matter, Universe

UCI Physicists Confirm Possible Discovery of Fifth Force of Nature

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Recent findings indicating the possible discovery of a previously unknown subatomic particle may be evidence of a fifth fundamental force of nature, according to a paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters by theoretical physicists at the University of California, Irvine.

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Cosmic, Universe, Astrophyics, Big Bang

Is Earthly Life Premature From a Cosmic Perspective?

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Cambridge, MA - The universe is 13.8 billion years old, while our planet formed just 4.5 billion years ago. Some scientists think this time gap means that life on other planets could be billions of years older than ours. However, new theoretical work suggests that present-day life is actually premature from a cosmic perspective.

Science

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Biodiversity, Biology, Zoology, veterinary science

The Aztec Treasure Unearthed: New Earth Snake Species Discovered in Mexico

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A new gem has been added to the vast treasure of Mexican reptiles. Mexican scientists recently described a new and strikingly colored species of earth snake from the mountains of Puebla and Veracruz in east-central Mexico.

Science

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NASA, Hubble Space Telescope, Advanced Camera For Surveys, Pisces A, Pisces B, Galaxies, Dwarf Galaxies, local void, distances, redshifts

Hubble Uncovers a Galaxy Pair Coming in From the Wilderness

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Hubble has captured the glow of new stars in the small, ancient galaxies Pisces A and Pisces B. They should've produced the bulk of their stars long ago, but these dwarf galaxies dwelled for billions of years in the Local Void, a region of the universe sparsely populated with galaxies. Now the tiny galaxies have moved into a region packed with galaxies and intergalactic gas triggering star birth.

Science

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archealogy, Ecology and Environment, Biology, Evolution, marine and freshwater biology, Paleontology

Unearthed: The Cannibal Sharks of a Forgotten Age

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Dublin, Ireland, Thursday 11th August, 2016 - Scientists have discovered macabre fossil evidence suggesting that 300 million-year-old sharks ate their own young, as fossil poop of adult Orthacanthus sharks contained the tiny teeth of juveniles. These fearsome marine predators used protected coastal lagoons to rear their babies, but it seems they also resorted to cannibalising them when other food sources became scarce.

Science

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astronomy & astrophysics, Planet, moon, Space And Planetary Science

NASA Climate Modeling Suggests Venus May Have Been Habitable

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Venus may have had a shallow liquid-water ocean and habitable surface temperatures for up to 2 billion years of its early history, according to computer modeling of the planet's ancient climate by scientists at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York.

Science

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Stone Age, Neolithic, Tools, Anthropology

Research Reveals Effectiveness of Stones Thrown as Weapons by Stone Age Hunters

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Stone objects collected by prehistoric hunters were effective as throwing weapons to hunt animals, research at Leeds Beckett University reveals.

Science

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atmosphere science, Earth Science, Space And Planetary Science, Stars/Sun, weather and storm

1967 Solar Storm Nearly Took US to Brink of War

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A solar storm that jammed radar and radio communications at the height of the Cold War could have led to a disastrous military conflict if not for the U.S. Air Force's budding efforts to monitor the sun's activity, a new study finds.







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