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Social Media Partly to Blame for Busybody Culture, Says Professor

The recent explosion of social media in our lives and domination of the air waves by so many "experts" are among the reasons people don't feel free to live their lives as they wish, according to Philosophy Professor John Lachs.

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Job Authority Increases Depression Symptoms in Women, Decreases Them in Men

A new study finds that having job authority increases symptoms of depression among women, but decreases them among men.

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Lean Times Ahead: Preparing for an Energy-Constrained Future

Some time this century, the era of cheap and abundant energy will end, and Western industrial civilization will likely begin a long, slow descent toward a resource-limited future characterized by "involuntary simplicity."

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Researchers Find Americans Sorting Themselves Into Politically Similar Counties

Researchers at the University of Rhode Island have analyzed almost 40 years of election data and relocation patterns around the United States and found that Americans are increasingly sorting themselves into politically homogeneous communities. But it hasn’t happened in the way they expected.

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Communities Support Wind Farms on the Prairies

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When it comes to potential for wind energy, the Midwest has it. However, to harness that power communities will have to come to terms with a landscape dotted with wind towers. That’s a reality people are willing to accept, according assistant professor of sociology and rural studies Jeffrey Jacquet. He and graduate student Josh Fergen have done research in South Dakota and Minnesota to gauge attitudes about wind farms and their impact on the community and the environment.

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Focusing on Executive Functions in Kindergarten Leads to Lasting Academic Improvements

An educational approach focused on the development of children’s executive functions – the ability to avoid distractions, focus attention, hold relevant information in working memory, and regulate impulsive behavior – improved academic learning in and beyond kindergarten, according to a new study by NYU researchers.

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Hope for Those with Social Anxiety Disorder: You May Already Be Someone’s Best Friend

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Making friends is often extremely difficult for people with social anxiety disorder and to make matters worse, people with this disorder tend to assume that the friendships they do have are not of the highest quality. The problem with this perception, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis, is that their friends don’t necessarily see it that way.

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Want to Improve Your Putt? Try Listening to Jazz

Listening to jazz music while putting can boost your performance on the putting green, according to new university research. While any kind of music improves performance compared to listening to no music at all, jazz is the most effective musical genre for improving putting.

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Greater Use of Social Media Gets Science, Scientists Noticed, Study Says

In September, a group of UW-Madison professors and their colleagues published a study in the journal Journalism & Mass Communications Quarterly showing a connection between “h-index” — a measure of the quality of a researcher’s work and influence — and whether the scientists interact with reporters and get mentioned on Twitter.

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Study Shows Why Cliques Thrive in Some Schools More Than in Others

Students in some schools form more cliquish, hierarchical, and segregated social structures than in others. What accounts for the variation?

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