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Homeowners Fared Better in Great Recession Than Renters

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While many Americans took a big financial hit during the Great Recession, homeowners were less likely than renters to lose very large proportions of their wealth, finds a new study from Michal Grinstein-Weiss, PhD, associate director of the Center for Social Development in the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

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Study: Men Tend to Be More Narcissistic Than Women

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With three decades of data from more than 475,000 participants, a new study on narcissism from the University at Buffalo School of Management reveals that men, on average, are more narcissistic than women.

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Marriage More Likely to End in Divorce When Wives Get Sick

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A new Iowa State University study analyzed the divorce rate for couples in which either spouse was diagnosed with a serious illness. The study found a higher probability of divorce for wives that got sick. However, a husband’s illness did not increase the risk.

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The Sound of Intellect: Job Seeker's Voice Reveals Intelligence

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A new study by University of Chicago Booth School of Business Professor Nicholas Epley and Ph.D. candidate Juliana Schroeder found that when hypothetical employers and professional recruiters listened to or read job candidates' job qualifications, they rated the candidates as more competent, thoughtful and intelligent when they heard the pitch than when they read it.

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Teens From Single-Parent Families Leave School Earlier

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Individuals who live in single-parent families as teens received fewer years of schooling and are less likely to attain a bachelor’s degree than those from two-parent families.

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Can You Judge a Man by His Fingers?

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Men with short index fingers and long ring fingers are on average nicer towards women. This phenomenon stems from their fetal life, and the hormones these men have been exposed to in their mother’s womb. The findings might help explain why these men have more children.

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Basic Personality Changes Linked to Unemployment, Study Finds

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Unemployment can change peoples' core personalities, making some less conscientious, agreeable and open, which may make it difficult for them to find new jobs, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Looking for Love? Use Reddit to Give Cupid Tech Support

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Study finds that users on OKCupid and mobile-based Tinder aren’t able to determine social norms or effective match-making techniques on the services, so they use Reddit to learn tips about online dating. Once there, they also find ways that allow them to “cheat the system” to interact with more potential dates

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Love Online Is About Being Real, Not Perfect

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How you fill out an online profile makes a big difference in how you're seen by others. New research shows it is better to be real with your information than trying to be perfect.

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More Women Choosing Living Together Over Marriage

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If it seems like more women are choosing to live with a partner instead of get married, you’re right. According to researchers at the National Center for Family and Marriage Research at Bowling Green State University, the percentage of women who have cohabitated with someone has almost doubled over the past 25 years.