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Getting Under the Skin in Victorian England

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In her most recent book, Wild Animal Skins in Victorian Britain: Zoos, Collections, Portraits, and Maps, Ann Colley integrates 19th century interest in animal skins with contemporary thinking about skin and identity.

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Study Finds We Think Better on Our Feet, Literally

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A study from the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. Preliminary results show 12 percent greater on-task engagement in classrooms with standing desks.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Study: Polarization in Congress Is Worsening, and It Stifles Policy Innovation

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A new study from the Santa Fe Institute confirms quantitatively that partisan disagreements in the U.S. Congress are worsening and that polarization is harmful to policy innovation.

Science

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Calculating How the Pacific Was Settled

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Using statistics that describe how an infectious disease spreads, a University of Utah anthropologist analyzed different theories of how people first settled islands of the vast Pacific between 3,500 and 900 years ago. Adrian Bell found the two most likely strategies were to travel mostly against prevailing winds and seek easily seen islands, not necessarily the nearest islands.

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Smithsonian Snapshot: Celebrate Jazz Appreciation Month with LeRoy Neiman’s “Big Band”

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LeRoy Neiman considered this 9-by-13-foot work featuring 18 iconic jazz musicians one of the greatest works in his career. Donated to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, it was recently unveiled for April, Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM).

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One in Three Young Adults with Autism Disconnected from Work and School

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Critical questions about life outcomes beyond clinical interventions are the focus of a report issued today from Drexel University’s A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, from its Life Course Outcomes Research Program. The “National Autism Indicators Report: Transition into Young Adulthood” is a comprehensive report (available free online) that presents new findings about a wide range of experiences and outcomes of youth on the autism spectrum between high school and their early 20s, including new safety and risk indicators for young adults with autism. The report describes the indicators now available and serves as a call to action to fill the remaining large gaps in knowledge.

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Education

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NYU Study Evaluates the Influence of College Experiences on Career Outcomes

Meaningful college experiences, including internships and studying abroad, may not matter as much as your major and what school you attend when it comes to job satisfaction and earnings, according to research by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

Medicine

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Convenience, Workplace Incentives May Increase Use of Public Transit

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Transit stops close to home and workplace incentives are associated with higher likelihood that commuters will choose public transportation, according to research from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study is co-authored by Aaron Hipp, PhD, assistant professor at the Brown School.

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Your Pain Reliever May Also Be Diminishing Your Joy

Researchers studying the commonly used pain reliever acetaminophen found it has a previously unknown side effect: It blunts positive emotions.

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Don’t Farm on Me: Northern Europeans to Neolithic Interlopers

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Northern Europeans in the Neolithic period initially rejected the practice of farming, which was otherwise spreading throughout the continent, a team of researchers has found. Their findings offer a new wrinkle in the history of a major economic revolution that moved civilizations away from foraging and hunting as a means for survival.