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How Make-Up Makes Men Admire but Other Women Jealous

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A psychology study by the University of Stirling has found that men think women with make-up on are more ‘prestigious’, while women think women who wear make-up are more ‘dominant’.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Jun-2016 12:00 AM EDT

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Intrusive Parents May Lead Children to Be Overly Self-Critical

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In a five-year study on primary school children in Singapore, researchers from the National University of Singapore found that children with intrusive parents had a higher tendency to be overly critical of themselves, and this tendency increased over the years.

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Research in Social Opinion Dynamics Sheds Light on Trump's Political Rise

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Scientists at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute used mathematical models to investigate how opinions spread when there is unusual dissent or diversity, as was the case for much of the 2016 Republican primary season, which began with 17 candidates seeking the party’s nomination.

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New Research Casts Doubt Over Tale of Famous Brontë Dress

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Research by the University of Southampton has called into question a centuries-old story behind a dress that once belonged to one of the nation’s most beloved novelists – Charlotte Brontë.

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‘Map’ of Teenage Brain Provides Strong Evidence of Link Between Serious Antisocial Behaviour and Brain Development

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The brains of teenagers with serious antisocial behaviour problems differ significantly in structure to those of their peers, providing the clearest evidence to date that their behaviour stems from changes in brain development in early life, according to new research led by the University of Southampton and the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with the University of Rome “Tor Vergata” in Italy.

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Why People Help Distant Kin

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Natural selection favors people who help close kin at their own expense: It can increase the odds the family’s genes are passed to future generations. But why assist distant relatives? Mathematical simulations by a University of Utah anthropologist suggest “socially enforced nepotism” encourages helping far-flung kin.

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Witnesses Can Catch Criminals by Smell

Move over sniffer dogs, people who witnessed a crime are able to identify criminals by their smell. Police lineups normally rely on sight, but nose-witnesses can be just as reliable as eye-witnesses, new research published in Frontiers in Psychology has found.

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Chivalry Is Not Dead When It Comes to Morality

We’re more likely to sacrifice a man than a woman when it comes to both saving the lives of others and in pursuing our self-interests, a team of psychology researchers has found.

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Will You Cast a Presidential Ballot on Nov. 8? UCI-Led Study Finds Questions Highly Effective in Influencing Behavior

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New study in the Journal of Consumer Psychology finds if people are asked a question – typically regarding a socially normative behavior – they are more likely to act consistently with the social norm than someone merely reminded or encouraged to engage in the behavior. Results could prove beneficial to presidential campaigns as candidates battle to get voters to the polls.

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Bad Behavior May Not Be a Result of Bad Parenting, but a Lack of Common Language

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Most parents will admit that talking with a teenage child can be difficult. It's even more challenging when they don’t speak the same language – a reality for a growing number of immigrant families. New research suggests this language barrier can have negative consequences.

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More Sex Partners Before Marriage Doesn’t Necessarily Lead to Divorce

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New research from University of Utah researcher Nicholas H. Wolfinger explores counterintuitive trends in the link between premarital sex and marital stability.

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Meaningful Work Not Created -- Only Destroyed -- by Bosses, Study Finds

Bosses play no role in fostering a sense of meaningfulness at work - but they do have the capacity to destroy it and should stay out of the way, new research shows.

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Americans Accept and Engage in Same-Sex Experiences More Than Ever

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A new study shows a fundamental shift in Americans’ attitudes about same-sex behavior. Since the 1990s, the percentage of adults who accept same-sex behavior has quadrupled, and those who have participated in same-sex experiences has doubled. These increases were among all generations, with Millennials leading the way.

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Increased Marrying, and Mating, by Education Level Not Affecting Genetic Make-Up, New Study Finds

While the latter half of the 20th century showed a widening gap between the more and less educated with respect to marriage and fertility, this trend has not significantly altered the genetic makeup of subsequent generations, a team of researchers has found.

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Why Everyone Wants to Help the Sick -- but Not the Unemployed

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New research from Aarhus BSS at Aarhus University explains why healthcare costs are running out of control, while costs to unemployment protection are kept in line. The answer is found deep in our psychology, where powerful intuitions lead us to view illness as the result of bad luck and worthy of help.

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‘Wonderful’ and ‘Thankful’ Versus ‘Battle’ and ‘Enemy’ -- Do Women and Men Communicate Differently?

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In a computational analysis of the words used by more than 65,000 consenting Facebook users in some 10 million messages, it was discovered that women use language that is warmer and more agreeable than men.

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Brit Accents Vex U.S. Hearing-Impaired Elderly

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Older Americans with some hearing loss shouldn’t feel alone if they have trouble understanding British TV sagas like “Downton Abbey.” A small study from the University of Utah suggests hearing-impaired senior citizens have more trouble than young people comprehending British accents when there is background noise.

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More Than a Myth: Drink Spiking Happens

Google the term “spiked drink,” and you’ll get more than 11 million hits, directing you to pages that describe being slipped a mickey, tips on how to avoid becoming a victim and even kits to test drinks for illicit drugs. So is drink spiking a growing problem or are these tales of people who just drank too much? Or is this phenomenon merely an urban legend?

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Extreme Preemies Disadvantaged in Employment, Income, Self-Esteem, Marriage and More by Their 30s

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Extremely low birth weight (ELBW) babies who survive are more likely to be disadvantaged in employment, income, self-esteem, marriage and more by the time they reach their 30s. A longitudinal study has followed the ELBW survivors born between 1977 and 1982.