Feature Channels

Featured: LifeWire

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Sep-2014 2:00 PM EDT

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Mindfulness Protects Adults’ Health From the Impacts of Childhood Adversity

Adults who were abused or neglected as children are known to have poorer health, but adults who tend to focus on and accept their reactions to the present moment—or are mindful—report having better health, regardless of their childhood adversity.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Sometimes, Adolescents Just Can't Resist

0386-1_revised_teenage_behavior_illustration_tilted2.jpg

A University of Iowa study finds teenagers are far more sensitive than adults to the immediate effect or reward of their behaviors. Even when a behavior is no longer in a teenager’s best interest to continue, they will because the effect of the reward is still there and lasts much longer in adolescents than in adults.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Childhood Mentors Have Positive Impact on Career Success

Mentorshipimage.jpg

New research finds that young people who have had mentors are more likely to find work early in their careers that gives them more responsibility and autonomy – ultimately putting them on a path to more financially and personally rewarding careers.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Diverse Neighborhoods May Help Infants’ Social Learning

Imitation1of4.jpg

Experiencing diverse communities by hearing different languages at the park, on a bus or in the grocery store may make babies more open-minded in their social learning, a new study finds.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Your Parents Were Right: New Research Shows Importance of Saying Thank You

Saying thank you has been among the commonest of cultural civilities for centuries. Now new research offers the first evidence that expressions of gratitude go beyond mere etiquette and provide real social benefit.

View | Comment

Life

Business

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

New ‘Green Growth’ Report Shows How the U.S. Can Cut Carbon Pollution by 40 Percent While Creating 2.7 Million New Jobs

Pollinhi-res.JPG

A new report from the UMass Amherst Political Economy Research Institute and the Center for American Progress shows that the United States can cut its carbon pollution by 40 percent from 2005 levels and create a net increase of 2.7 million clean energy jobs in the process, reducing the unemployment rate by 1.5 percentage points.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Seminaries Do Very Little to Train Pastors How to Help Mentally Ill Congregants

Mentallyillandseminaries.jpg

People struggling with mental illness often turn to pastors for help, but seminaries do very little to train ministers how to recognize serious psychological distress and when to refer someone to a doctor or psychologist, Baylor research shows.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

When Offering Someone a Job Hurts More Than It Helps

SongLijun.jpg

A Vanderbilt sociologist has made the surprising discovery that unsolicited job leads can increase symptoms of depression in people who are employed full-time or happy with their financial status.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Reacting to Personal Setbacks: Do You Bounce Back or Give Up?

IMG_1364hi-res.jpg

Sometimes when people get upsetting news – such as a failing exam grade or a negative job review – they decide instantly to do better the next time. In other situations that are equally disappointing, the same people may feel inclined to just give up. How can similar setbacks produce such different reactions? It may come down to how much control we feel we have over what happened, according to new research from Rutgers University-Newark. The study, published in the journal Neuron, also finds that when these setbacks occur, the level of control we perceive may even determine which of two distinct parts of the brain will handle the crisis.

View | Comment