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What 'Tainted' Engagement Rings Reveal About Consumer Expectations

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Thinking about buying an engagement ring for Valentine's Day?

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Americans Recognize 'Past Presidents' Who Never Were, Study Finds

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Alexander Hamilton, Benjamin Franklin, Hubert Humphrey and some guy named "Thomas Moore" are among the names that many Americans mistakenly identify as belonging to a past president of the United States, finds a news study by memory researchers at Washington University in St. Louis.

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‘A Word's Worth More Than a Thousand Pictures’ According to New FAU Study on Young Children

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Children play an important role in ensuring that they are cared for by adults by using physical and cognitive cues. But what’s more important in how they influence adults and elicit their nurturing spirit? Is it their physical features or what they say?

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'Pushback' Against Constant Connectivity Also Reflected in Images, Study Follow-Up Finds

People expressing the wish to resist constant online connectivity — dubbed "pushback" by University of Washington Information School researchers — is manifested as powerfully in images as in text, further study has found.

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Popular Diet Myths Debunked

Thousands flock to the internet in search of ways to boost a healthy lifestyle. Many popular diet facts and trends are circulated so often in the media that it’s hard to know which tips to trust and which ones should be tossed. Underneath popular opinion and platitudes, the truth about eating healthy may surprise you. A Texas A&M Health Science Center registered dietician separates myths from fact when it comes to your diet.

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Cluttered Kitchens Cause Over-Snacking

A cluttered and chaotic kitchen can often cause out-of-control stressful feelings. It might also cause something else — increased snacking of indulgent treats.

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Study: Vacations Can Lead to Weight Gain, Contribute to ‘Creeping Obesity’

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A faculty member in the University of Georgia’s College of Family and Consumer Sciences found that adults going on a one- to three-week vacation gained an average of nearly 1 pound during their trips. With the average American reportedly gaining 1-2 pounds a year, the study’s findings suggest an alarming trend.

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Political Duels at Work? Baylor Expert Gives 9 Tips to Keep the Peace

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Sparring over immigration reform, ISIS and whether Trump should be in the White House can go quickly from casual to spirited to heated during water-cooler chats at work or in staff meetings.

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From Japan to Samoa: Understanding the Origins of Sexual Behavior

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Award-winning researcher focuses on mental health challenges facing sexual and gender minority groups.

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Good Boss? Bad Boss? Study Says Workers Leave Both

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When fast-rising employees quit their jobs for better pay or more responsibility at another organization, the knee-jerk reaction may be to blame their leaving on a bad boss. Although the common perception is that workers join companies but leave managers, new research by a University of Illinois business professor shows that workers leave good bosses, too -- and for companies, there may be a silver lining to their departure.

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Urban Sprawl Stunts Upward Mobility, U Study Finds

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A recent study by University of Utah Department of City & Metropolitan Planning professor Reid Ewing and his colleagues in Utah, Texas and Louisiana, tested the relationship between urban sprawl and upward mobility for metropolitan areas in the United States. The study examined potential pathways through which sprawl may have an effect on mobility and uses mathematical models to account for both direct and indirect effects of sprawl on upward mobility.

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Study: Controlling Parents Create Mean College Kids

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College students whose parents lay on the guilt or try to manipulate them may translate feelings of stress into similar mean behavior with their own friends, a new study by a University of Vermont psychologist has found. The students’ physical response to stress, which the researchers measured in a laboratory test, influenced the way they carry out that hostility – either immediately and impulsively or in a cold, calculated way.

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Human Sounds Convey Emotions Clearer and Faster Than Words

It takes just one-tenth of a second for our brains to begin to recognize emotions conveyed by vocalizations, according to researchers from McGill. It doesn’t matter whether the non-verbal sounds are growls of anger, the laughter of happiness or cries of sadness. More importantly, the researchers have also discovered that we pay more attention when an emotion (such as happiness, sadness or anger) is expressed through vocalizations than we do when the same emotion is expressed in speech.

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New FAU Report Shows 45 Percent Increase in Death by Law Enforcement From 1999 to 2013

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Between 1999 and 2013, there were 5,511 deaths by legal intervention or law enforcement in the U.S., and in 2013, an estimated 11.3 million arrests resulted in approximately 480 deaths from law enforcement.

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Study: Workplace Flexibility Benefits Employees

New research released today shows that workers at a Fortune 500 company who participated in a pilot work flexibility program voiced higher levels of job satisfaction and reduced levels of burnout and psychological stress than employees within the same company who did not participate.

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Gov’t Instability Prompts Support for Lighter-Skinned Candidates Among Both Blacks and Whites, Study Shows

Government instability prompts both Black and White Americans to show a preference for lighter-skinned over darker-skinned political candidates, researchers at New York University, the University of Chicago, and Rutgers University have found.

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Arctic Architecture

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This semester, 14 University of Virginia architecture and landscape architecture undergraduate and graduate students spent 10 days on Norwegian Arctic islands 800 miles north of the Arctic Circle, learning how to design for a harsh, dynamic environment that many see as the next great frontier of development.

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Religious Beliefs Don’t Always Lead to Violence

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Study shows thinking from God’s perspective can reduce bias against others.

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During Great Recession Employees Drank Less on the Job, but More Afterwards

A new study from the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions explores the effects of the Great Recession of 2007-09 on alcohol use among people who remained employed.

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Why White, Older Men Are More Likely to Die of Suicide

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An important factor in white men’s psychological brittleness and vulnerability to suicide once they reach late life may be dominant scripts of masculinity, aging and suicide, a Colorado State University psychology researcher says.