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Who Are the Men and Boys Suffering From Anorexia?

A new study by researchers from the University of Montreal reveals the current state of knowledge about anorexia in men and boys. "Our results show that certain particularities can be identified in males, especially related to personality, gender identity, and sexual orientation", says Laurence Corbeil-Serre.

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New Study Lists Top Psychologists of Modern Era

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A U.Va. study ranks the top 200 psychologists from recent decades.

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Classroom Intervention Helps Shy Kids Learn

A program that helps teachers modify their interactions with students based on an individual’s temperament helps shy children to become more engaged in their class work, and in turn, improves their math and critical thinking skills.

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Human Sense of Fairness Evolved to Favor Long-Term Cooperation

The human response to unfairness evolved in order to support long-term cooperation, according to a research team from Georgia State University and Emory University.

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Must Women Be Seen to Be Heard?

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A new article in the National Communication Association journal Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies examines the voice in TV advertising and its relation to visual image and gender. Do advertising voice-overs affect consumer perceptions of gender? Using quantitative and qualitative analysis, Mark Pedelty, an Associate Professor in Communication Studies at the University of Minnesota, and Morgan Kuecker test their hypotheses on these issues. Their fascinating results reveal some thought provoking insights into audio visual media gender representations.

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Fighting Parents Hurt Children’s Ability to Recognize and Regulate Emotions

Exposure to verbal and physical aggression between parents may hurt a child’s ability to identify and control emotions, according to a longitudinal study led by NYU Steinhardt.

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Artworks Are People!

We see art more as a person than an object, according to new research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. And in some cases, we make distinctions between artworks — say, an exact replica of a piece created by the artist, versus one created by a different artist. Art, in other words, is an extension of the creator, write Professor Daniel M. Bartels of Chicago Booth, and Professor George E. Newman and Rosanna K. Smith, a doctoral student, both of Yale University School of Management.

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Medicine

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Mindfulness Protects Adults’ Health From the Impacts of Childhood Adversity

Adults who were abused or neglected as children are known to have poorer health, but adults who tend to focus on and accept their reactions to the present moment—or are mindful—report having better health, regardless of their childhood adversity.

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Sometimes, Adolescents Just Can't Resist

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A University of Iowa study finds teenagers are far more sensitive than adults to the immediate effect or reward of their behaviors. Even when a behavior is no longer in a teenager’s best interest to continue, they will because the effect of the reward is still there and lasts much longer in adolescents than in adults.

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Childhood Mentors Have Positive Impact on Career Success

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New research finds that young people who have had mentors are more likely to find work early in their careers that gives them more responsibility and autonomy – ultimately putting them on a path to more financially and personally rewarding careers.

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