Feature Channels:

Drug Resistance

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Aug-2015 5:00 AM EDT

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Evolutionary War Between Microorganisms Affecting Human Health, IU Biologist Says

bashey-visser_farrah.jpg

Health experts have warned for years that the overuse of antibiotics is creating “superbugs” able to resist drugs treating infection. Now scientists at Indiana University and elsewhere are finding evidence that an invisible war between microorganisms may also be catching humans in the crossfire.

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Health Care Providers A Major Contributor to Problem of Antibiotic Overuse

Differences in the routines of individual providers drives variation in antibiotic prescribing, more than differences in patient characteristics, standards of practice at different hospitals, or clinical settings (emergency department, primary care, urgent care). The report, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, is an important step toward understanding the problem of antibiotic overuse, a major public health concern given the rise in antibiotic-resistant “superbugs”.

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Drug-Resistant Bacteria Possess Natural Ability to Become Vulnerable to Antibiotics

Abaumanniiprimary.jpg

Infections with one of the most troublesome and least understood antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” are increasing. But now scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown the bacteria, A. baumannii, can naturally relinquish its defenses against antibiotics.

Medicine

Channels:

Repeated Courses of Antibiotics May Profoundly Alter Children’s Development

A new animal study by NYU Langone Medical Center researchers adds to growing evidence that multiple courses of commonly used antibiotics may have a significant impact on children’s development.

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

A Person’s Diet, Acidity of Urine May Affect Susceptibility to UTIs

The acidity of urine — as well as the presence of small molecules related to diet — may influence how well bacteria can grow in the urinary tract, a new study shows. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, may have implications for treating urinary tract infections, which are among the most common bacterial infections worldwide.

Medicine

Channels:

Trial Compares Antibiotics vs Appendectomy for Treatment of Appendicitis

Among patients with uncomplicated appendicitis, antibiotic treatment did not meet a prespecified level of effectiveness compared with appendectomy, although most patients who received antibiotic therapy did not require an appendectomy, and for those who did, they did not experience significant complications, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA.

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Mount Sinai Scientists Develop New Technique for Analyzing the Epigenetics of Bacteria, a Potential New Tool to Combat Pathogens and Overcome Antibiotic Resistance

Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a new technique to more precisely analyze bacterial populations, to reveal epigenetic mechanisms that can drive virulence.

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Queen's Researchers in Hospital Superbug Breakthrough

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have developed a cutting-edge new medical therapy that could protect UK hospital patients against a lethal superbug.

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Common Antibiotic May Be the Answer to Many Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infections

gnr_plus_azm_LL37_Nizet.jpg

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences report that the common antibiotic azithromycin kills many multidrug-resistant bacteria very effectively — when tested under conditions that closely resemble the human body and its natural antimicrobial factors. The researchers believe the finding, published June 10 by EBioMedicine, could prompt an immediate review of the current standard of care for patients with certain so-called “superbug” infections.