Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 430

Article ID: 694979

Real Time, Portable DNA Sequencing Fights Drug-Resistant TB

Stony Brook University

Scientists in Madagascar have for the first time performed DNA sequencing in-country using novel, portable technology to rapidly identify the bacteria responsible for tuberculosis (TB) and its drug resistance profile.

Released:
23-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
bacterial-biofilm.jpg

Article ID: 694906

How Bacteria Behave Differently in Humans Compared to the Lab

Georgia Institute of Technology

Most of what we know today about deadly bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was obtained from studies done in laboratory settings. Research reported May 14 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that this laboratory-based information may have important limits for predicting how these bugs behave once they’ve invaded humans.

Released:
21-May-2018 7:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
mrsa-thumb.jpg

Article ID: 694591

Study: Superbug MRSA Infections Less Costly, but Still Deadly

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Drug-resistant staph infections continue to be deadlier than those that are not resistant and treatable with traditional antibiotics, but treatment costs surprisingly are the same or slightly less, a new national analysis shows.

Released:
15-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 649790

Inside Cancer Cells, Tumor Growth in Kidney Cancer, Genetic Screening Guidelines, and More in the Cancer News Source

Newswise

Click here to go directly to the Cancer News Source

Released:
11-May-2018 3:15 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 694444

Rush is First to Use Microburst Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

Rush University Medical Center

Epilepsy patients who have not responded to standard drug treatments may benefit from a new therapy that delivers high frequency bursts of electrical stimulation, called microbursts, to the brain. Rush University Medical Center in Chicago is the first health care provider in the world to provide this treatment, known as microburst vagus nerve stimulation.

Released:
11-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 694447

Multi-Drug Resistant Infections Rising in Children

Rush University Medical Center

Antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections, one of the most common hospital-acquired infections in children across the United States, are on the rise, according to results of a recent study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society on March 22.

Released:
11-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
GramnegativeF.jpg

Article ID: 694158

Researchers Discover Cellular Messengers Communicate with Bacteria in the Mouth

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA Gram negative F. nucleatum-induced host-generated tsRNA inhibits the growth of F. nucleatum (top row) but not Streptococcus mitis (bottom row).   A new UCLA-led study provides clear evidence that cellular messengers in saliva may be able to regulate the growth of oral bacteria responsible for diseases, such as periodontitis and meningitis.

Released:
7-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Ostrosky-Luis-2018-web1.jpg

Article ID: 693931

Pioneering Paper Shows Infection Control and Prevention in Clinics Is in Everyone’s Hands

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

When it comes to the examination room at your health care clinic, you might think that avoiding catching the flu or other more deadly viruses is out of your hands, so to speak. But infectious disease experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), who just published a practical guide for infectious disease control in clinics, reveal how we can all help make a difference in infection control.

Released:
2-May-2018 4:20 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Antibiotic-Bacteria_forweb.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    30-Apr-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693647

Bacteria’s Appetite May Be Key to Cleaning Up Antibiotic Contamination

Washington University in St. Louis

Some bacteria not only escape being killed by bacteria, they turn it into food. Until now, scientists have understood little about how bacteria manage to consume antibiotics safely, but new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis illuminates key steps in the process. The findings, published April 30 in Nature Chemical Biology, could lead to new ways to eliminate antibiotics from land and water, the researchers said. Environmental antibiotic contamination promotes drug resistance and undermines our ability to treat bacterial infections.

Released:
27-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
GettyImages-497970214.jpg

Article ID: 693691

New Study Identifies Ways Smaller Community Hospitals Can Reduce Antibiotic Overuse to Prevent Growth of Superbugs

Intermountain Medical Center

Researchers at Intermountain Healthcare and University of Utah Health in Salt Lake City have completed a study identifying how community hospitals with fewer than 200 beds can develop antibiotic stewardship programs that work to prevent the growth of antibiotic-resistant organisms, or “superbugs,” which are becoming more common and deadly.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 6:00 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Showing results

110 of 430





Chat now!