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TSRI Scientists Uncover Surprising Mechanism Behind Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus develops resistance to the antibiotic arylomycin by “switching on” a previously uncharacterized set of genes, explaining higher antibiotic resistance rates in some bacteria.

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Biologist Investigates How Gene-Swapping Bacteria Evade Antibiotics

A scientific peek into bacteria boudoirs is revealing how “sex” among disease-causing microbes can lead different species or strains to become resistant to antibiotic medications.

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Lice in at Least 25 States Show Resistance to Common Treatments

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The start of the school year means new classes, new friends, homework and sports. It also brings the threat of head lice. Scientists report today that lice populations in at least 25 states have developed resistance to over-the-counter treatments still widely recommended by doctors and schools. The researchers are presenting their work today at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

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Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Importance of `Antibiotic Stewardship’ in the Age of Superbug Threats

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Evolutionary War Between Microorganisms Affecting Human Health, IU Biologist Says

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Health experts have warned for years that the overuse of antibiotics is creating “superbugs” able to resist drugs treating infection. Now scientists at Indiana University and elsewhere are finding evidence that an invisible war between microorganisms may also be catching humans in the crossfire.

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Health Care Providers A Major Contributor to Problem of Antibiotic Overuse

Differences in the routines of individual providers drives variation in antibiotic prescribing, more than differences in patient characteristics, standards of practice at different hospitals, or clinical settings (emergency department, primary care, urgent care). The report, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, is an important step toward understanding the problem of antibiotic overuse, a major public health concern given the rise in antibiotic-resistant “superbugs”.

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Drug-Resistant Bacteria Possess Natural Ability to Become Vulnerable to Antibiotics

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Infections with one of the most troublesome and least understood antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” are increasing. But now scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown the bacteria, A. baumannii, can naturally relinquish its defenses against antibiotics.

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Repeated Courses of Antibiotics May Profoundly Alter Children’s Development

A new animal study by NYU Langone Medical Center researchers adds to growing evidence that multiple courses of commonly used antibiotics may have a significant impact on children’s development.

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A Person’s Diet, Acidity of Urine May Affect Susceptibility to UTIs

The acidity of urine — as well as the presence of small molecules related to diet — may influence how well bacteria can grow in the urinary tract, a new study shows. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, may have implications for treating urinary tract infections, which are among the most common bacterial infections worldwide.

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Trial Compares Antibiotics vs Appendectomy for Treatment of Appendicitis

Among patients with uncomplicated appendicitis, antibiotic treatment did not meet a prespecified level of effectiveness compared with appendectomy, although most patients who received antibiotic therapy did not require an appendectomy, and for those who did, they did not experience significant complications, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA.