Feature Channels: Pain

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Newswise: Penn’s ‘Enhanced Recovery’ Program Significantly Reduces Post-Op Opioid Use
6-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Penn’s ‘Enhanced Recovery’ Program Significantly Reduces Post-Op Opioid Use
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Medicine researchers found that when an “Enhanced Recovery After Surgery” protocol was employed—which optimizes patients’ surgical care before, during, and after surgery—the majority of patients did not need opioids for pain management at one, three, and six months after elective spinal and peripheral nerve surgery.

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Released: 28-Jul-2020 6:45 PM EDT
University of Cincinnati ergonomics expert says work smarter at home
University of Cincinnati

Taking a few minutes to get that periodic cup of joe might not be such a bad idea.

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Released: 23-Jul-2020 4:40 PM EDT
Neandertals may have had a lower threshold for pain
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

As several Neandertal genomes of high quality are now available researchers can identify genetic changes that were present in many or all Neandertals, investigate their physiological effects and look into their consequences when they occur in people today.

20-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Nature’s epidural: Genetic variant may explain why some women don’t need pain relief during childbirth
University of Cambridge

Women who do not need pain relief during childbirth may be carriers of a key genetic variant that acts a natural epidural, say scientists at the University of Cambridge.

Newswise:Video Embedded spinal-stimulators-for-pain-relief-repurposed-to-restore-touch-in-a-lost-limb
VIDEO
Released: 21-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Spinal Stimulators for Pain Relief Repurposed to Restore Touch in a Lost Limb
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Devices commonly implanted for chronic pain could expand patient access to prosthetic arms that "feel."

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Released: 17-Jul-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Cannabis shows potential for mitigating sickle cell disease pain
University of California, Irvine

Cannabis appears to be a safe and potentially effective treatment for the chronic pain that afflicts people with sickle cell disease, according to a new clinical trial co-led by University of California, Irvine researcher Kalpna Gupta and Dr. Donald Abrams of UC San Francisco. The findings appear in JAMA Network Open.

Newswise: Significantly less addictive opioid may slow progression of osteoarthritis while easing pain
Released: 13-Jul-2020 6:15 AM EDT
Significantly less addictive opioid may slow progression of osteoarthritis while easing pain
Keck Medicine of USC

A Keck Medicine of USC study reveals that kappa opioids, a significantly less addictive opioid, may preserve cartilage in joints and ease pain

8-Jul-2020 6:35 PM EDT
Nurses’ Use of Physician Term Anesthesiologist Misleading to Patients
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) yesterday urged the New Hampshire Supreme Court to uphold the New Hampshire Medical Board’s decision that health care professionals using the term “anesthesiologist” must be licensed physicians and meet all the requirements to practice medicine in the state, according to an amicus curiae brief filed on behalf of ASA and the American Medical Association (AMA).

Newswise: Medical Cannabis put to the test in first ever real-world evidence clinical trial led by UHN
Released: 9-Jul-2020 5:00 AM EDT
Medical Cannabis put to the test in first ever real-world evidence clinical trial led by UHN
University Health Network (UHN)

Medical cannabis is finally being put under the microscope, in a first-of-its-kind real world evidence study led by Dr. Hance Clarke, Toronto General Hospital. In the Medical Cannabis Real-World Evidence trial patients using the online portal created by Medical Cannabis by Shoppers, will know exactly what is in their product and its effectiveness.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Lower Back Pain Can Improve After Total Hip Replacement
Hospital for Special Surgery

A new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City reveals that symptomatic lower back pain resolved in 82% of patients after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and identifies which patients are more likely to have their back pain resolved. This study is available online as part of the AAOS 2020 Virtual Education Experience.

Newswise: More than medicine: pain-relief drug delivers choices for mothers in labour
Released: 30-Jun-2020 8:05 PM EDT
More than medicine: pain-relief drug delivers choices for mothers in labour
University of South Australia

Choice and control are important factors for ensuring a positive childbirth experience, yet until recently, little was known about the impact of alternative administrations of fentanyl – one of the pain relief drugs used during labour– on both mother and baby.

Newswise: Managing Pain After Sports Medicine Surgery
Released: 17-Jun-2020 2:40 PM EDT
Managing Pain After Sports Medicine Surgery
Henry Ford Health System

A Henry Ford Hospital study published in the Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery has found that patients who underwent knee surgery and other types of sports medicine procedures could manage their pain without opioids or a minimal dosage. “This is a large prospective study and our hope is that non-opioid use will gain momentum and that others may tweak our protocol and use it throughout orthopedics, from joint surgery to spine surgery and other surgeries” says Vasilios (Bill) Moutzouros, M.D., chief of Sports Medicine, a division of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery and the study’s lead author.

17-Jun-2020 10:15 AM EDT
10 Percent of Patients Continue to Use Opioids Three to Six Months After Heart Surgery
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Nearly 10 percent of patients who are prescribed opioid medications following heart surgery will continue to use opioids more than 90 days after the procedure, according to a new study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

10-Jun-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Delta Opioid Receptor Identified as Promising Therapeutic Target for Inflammatory Pain Relief
New York University

Delta opioid receptors have a built-in mechanism for pain relief and can be precisely targeted with drug-delivering nanoparticles—making them a promising target for treating chronic inflammatory pain with fewer side effects, according to a new study from an international team of researchers. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), was conducted using cells from humans and mice with inflammatory bowel disease, which can cause chronic pain.

Released: 9-Jun-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Botox Is an Effective Treatment for Some Common Sports Injuries, New Research Suggests
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

While botulinum toxin is commonly known as a cosmetic treatment for facial lines and wrinkles, a growing body of evidence suggests that “Botox” can also be an effective treatment for certain sports injuries and chronic pain conditions, according to a review in the June issue of Current Sports Medicine Reports, official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Cannabis in Michigan: New report documents trends before recreational legalization
Released: 4-Jun-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Cannabis in Michigan: New report documents trends before recreational legalization
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Nearly twelve years ago, Michigan voters approved the use of medical cannabis by residents with certain health conditions. A year and a half ago, they voted to approve its use by all adults, for any reason. What happened between those two dates is the focus of a comprehensive new report.

Newswise: COVID-19 Pandemic Highlights Advantages of Digital Technology in Clinical Research
Released: 2-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
COVID-19 Pandemic Highlights Advantages of Digital Technology in Clinical Research
Osteopathic Research Center, University of North Texas Health Science Center

Digital technology has facilitated continued research operations for a pain research registry during the COVID-19 pandemic. Cloud-based systems that allow remote management of research studies and collection of data may signal a new trend for future clinical research endeavors.

Released: 1-Jun-2020 7:20 PM EDT
New test method can offer safer dosages of hydroxychloroquine
Uppsala University

Researchers at Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital have developed a new method to measure levels of the medication hydroxychloroquine in patients with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Newswise: The Psychedelic Science of Pain
Released: 22-May-2020 2:20 PM EDT
The Psychedelic Science of Pain
University of California San Diego

The Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination at UC San Diego organized the collaborative Psychedelics and Health Research Initiative, which explores the potential for psychedelics to address chronic pain conditions.

Newswise: Pain doesn’t take a holiday: Dental opioids study points to need for better prescribing
Released: 22-May-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Pain doesn’t take a holiday: Dental opioids study points to need for better prescribing
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

As dentists and their teams across America get back to their regular schedules after a sharp COVID-19-related reduction, a new study shows a key opportunity to reduce the use of opioid painkillers by their patients. The analysis shows that those who had dental procedures on a Friday or a day before a holiday were much more likely to fill a prescription for an opioid than other patients.

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Released: 20-May-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Legal Cannabis hemp oil effectively treats chronic neuropathic pain
University of New Mexico

Researchers examine the effectiveness of consuming hemp oil extracted from the whole Cannabis plant using a chronic neuropathic pain animal model.

Newswise:Video Embedded a-sound-treatment
VIDEO
20-May-2020 2:00 PM EDT
A sound treatment
University of Utah

University of Utah biomedical engineering assistant professor Jan Kubanek has discovered that sound waves of high frequency (ultrasound) can be emitted into a patient’s brain to alter his or her state. It’s a non-invasive treatment that doesn’t involve medications or surgery and has a unique potential to treat mental disorders including depression and anxiety and neurological disorders such as chronic pain and epilepsy.

Released: 19-May-2020 2:00 PM EDT
Cannabis use for management of chronic musculoskeletal pain increasing, new study shows
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

The use of medical cannabis has garnered a lot of recent attention, especially as parts of the United States and Canada have legalized its use. While it has been studied in cancer and nerve pain, not much is known about the usage rate and its efficacy in managing chronic musculoskeletal (MSK) pain. According to a new study released as part of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ (AAOS) Virtual Education Experience, up to 20% of patients presenting to an orthopaedic surgeon with chronic MSK pain are using cannabis to manage their pain, with many reporting success. Additionally, two-thirds of non-users are interested in using it for the management of MSK pain, prompting a need to further study its effects.

Newswise: Nerve stimulation helps manage pain without opioids
Released: 19-May-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Nerve stimulation helps manage pain without opioids
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin (UW) are adapting a minimally invasive, safer approach to electrically treat pain directly at the source as part of the NIH Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins
Released: 14-May-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

12-May-2020 3:20 PM EDT
Physera Delivers Physical Therapy to the Masses with New Direct-to-Consumer Telehealth Service
Physera

To ease access to needed healthcare services during the COVID-19 crisis, Physera, an app-based platform for remote physical therapy, today announced that it has launched a new direct-to-consumer service for people who have musculoskeletal (MSK) issues and pain.

1-May-2020 1:10 PM EDT
For Better Migraine Treatment, Try Adding Some Downward Dogs
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Adding yoga to your regularly prescribed migraine treatment may be better than medication alone, according to a study published in the May 6, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The new research suggests yoga may help people with migraines have headaches that happen less often, don’t last as long and are less painful. EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL 4 P.M. ET, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 2020 Media Contacts: Renee Tessman, rtessman@aan.com, (612) 928-6137 M.A. Rosko, mrosko@aan.com, (612) 928-6169 For Better Migraine Treatment, Try Adding Some Downward Dogs MINNEAPOLIS - Adding yoga to your regularly prescribed migraine treatment may be better than medication alone, according to a study published in the May 6, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The new research suggests yoga may help people with migraines have headaches that happen less often, don’t last as long and are less pain

Newswise: Gender identity plays a role in the amount of pain experienced by individuals with chronic pain
Released: 1-May-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Gender identity plays a role in the amount of pain experienced by individuals with chronic pain
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Gender identity and genetic sex are distinctly variable when it comes to pain tolerance, according to a study published in the Journal of Pain Research.

Released: 27-Apr-2020 8:35 AM EDT
Public Health Expert Discusses Potential Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Access to Recommended First-Line Treatments for Chronic Pain
Osteopathic Research Center, University of North Texas Health Science Center

Public health expert, John C. Licciardone, a physician and preventive medicine specialist, discusses the potential impact of COVID-19 on patients' access to recommended treatments for chronic pain.

Newswise: An Integrated Approach to Reducing Ventilation Time
21-Apr-2020 11:25 AM EDT
An Integrated Approach to Reducing Ventilation Time
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)

A Texas hospital developed an integrated approach that reduced ventilation time for ICU patients. The 2018 study, in AACN Advanced Critical Care, is the first to examine the effects of implementing protocol-directed sedation with the coordinated use of two evidence-based assessments across multiple disciplines.

Newswise:Video Embedded investigators-experiment-with-differing-amounts-of-anesthetic-to-provide-pain-control-during-shoulder-surgery-but-reduce-chances-for-respiratory-complications
VIDEO
20-Apr-2020 5:05 AM EDT
Investigators Experiment with Differing Amounts of Anesthetic to Provide Pain Control during Shoulder Surgery and Reduce Chances for Respiratory Complications
American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)

Hemidiaphragmatic paresis, or HDP, is a condition in which one side of the diaphragm is weakened, resulting in shortness of breath and reduced respiratory function. It can occur when a patient is given regional anesthesia for shoulder surgery, using the supraclavicular nerve block. Researchers are trying to determine the right amount of anesthesia to use in the supraclavicular block so that the block still works but the chances of developing HDP are low.

20-Apr-2020 5:05 AM EDT
Experimental Lidocaine Derivatives May Be the Future of Postoperative Pain Control
American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)

Researchers from the University of British Columbia studied three lidocaine derivatives for use as motor blockade with promising results. This study provides insight into developing more effective, longer-lasting non-opioid local anesthetics, which could improve postoperative pain control. ASRA presented researchers with "Best of Meeting Abstract" and "Resident/Fellow Travel Award" for their work.

Newswise:Video Embedded researchers-looking-for-the-best-way-to-keep-patients-safe-during-anesthesia-for-shoulder-surgery
VIDEO
20-Apr-2020 5:05 AM EDT
Researchers Looking for the Best Way to Keep Patients Safe During Anesthesia for Shoulder Surgery
American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)

Interscalene blocks are a type of regional anesthesia used to relieve pain during and after shoulder surgery. This procedure can lead to numbing of the phrenic nerve as well, however, which can lead to pulmonary complications. Researchers at Stanford University are experimenting with different amounts of saline that can help reverse the phrenic nerve blockade while still maintaining analgesic effect.

Newswise:Video Embedded the-sooner-hip-replacement-patients-can-get-up-and-walk-after-surgery-the-faster-they-can-recover-at-home
VIDEO
20-Apr-2020 5:05 AM EDT
The Sooner Hip Replacement Patients Can Get Up and Walk after Surgery, the Faster They Can Recover at Home
American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)

The sooner hip replacement patients can walk after surgery, the faster they can be discharged, allowing for more comfortable recovery at home, lower overall cost of care, and increased availability of critical hospital resources. Results of a recent study found that patients who received mepivacaine spinal anesthesia were more likely to ambulate early and be discharged on the day of surgery.

Newswise:Video Embedded erector-spinae-plane-block-spares-common-complications-after-shoulder-surgery
VIDEO
20-Apr-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Erector Spinae Plane Block Spares Common Complications After Shoulder Surgery
American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)

Using an erector spinae plane block (ESPB) for postoperative analgesia from total shoulder replacement offers advantages over the more commonly used interscalene brachial plexus nerve block, including avoiding phrenic nerve complications and upper-extremity mobility issues, researchers from Stanford University in Stanford, CA, reported in findings from a new study.

Newswise: COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins
Released: 21-Apr-2020 12:50 PM EDT
COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins Medicine

For more information about coronavirus disease (COVID-19) from Johns Hopkins Medicine, visit hopkinsmedicine.org/coronavirus. For information on coronavirus disease (COVID-19) from around the Johns Hopkins enterprise, including from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and The Johns Hopkins University, visit coronavirus.jhu.edu.

Released: 20-Apr-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Kawate lab unveils structure of major membrane protein
Cornell University

In a paper published on Feb 12 in the journal eLife, Dr. Toshimitsu Kawate, associate professor in the Department of Molecular Medicine and his team reveal the form of pannexin1, a cellular membrane protein present in all vertebrates. With the size, shape and formation of this protein revealed for the first time, scientists can get closer to fine tuning new therapies for a multitude of diseases, including chronic pain, infertility and cancer.

Released: 20-Apr-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Rutgers Expert Discusses How to Manage Chronic Pain, Opioid Addiction During COVID-19
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Many people trying to manage their pain and addiction have lost their support programs due to COVID-19. A Rutgers expert in Emergency Medicine discusses how patients can manage the disease during the coronavirus crisis.

Newswise: Pioneer in Anesthesia Among Award Winners Recognized by ASRA
Released: 20-Apr-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Pioneer in Anesthesia Among Award Winners Recognized by ASRA
American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)

ASRA award recipients are being recognized for their accomplishments despite the cancellation of the group's annual spring meeting. Included in recipients is the anesthesia pioneer who identified a treatment for local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST), a serious potential complication associated with procedures involving local anesthetics.

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Released: 16-Apr-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Call for palliative care to be adapted for severely ill Covid-19 patients
Lancaster University

Emergency-style palliative care needs to implemented to meet the needs of Covid-19 patients who wouldn't benefit from a ventilator say researchers.

13-Apr-2020 5:20 PM EDT
Prescribing an overdose: A chapter in the opioid epidemic
Mayo Clinic

Research indicates that widespread opioid overprescribing contributed to the opioid epidemic. New research shows that this dangerous trend has apparently been coupled with another: inappropriate use of high-potency opioids.

Released: 13-Apr-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Working From Home Without Pain
Rush University Medical Center

According to physiatrist Max Fitzgerald, MD, we should focus on routines that prevent our muscles from getting tight and causing pain. This is increasingly important as we are dealing with both the emotional and physical toll of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Released: 8-Apr-2020 4:10 PM EDT
Whether marijuana helps with pain is unclear, study suggests
Ohio State University

Medical marijuana users who say they have high levels of pain are more likely than those with low pain to say they use cannabis three or more times a day, a new study finds.

Released: 7-Apr-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Alleviating Confusion around Pain Management Recommendations
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

New information from NCCN, ASCO, ASH, CDC, FDA, and others seeks to provide clear guidance on how to optimally manage cancer-related pain without exacerbating the ongoing opioid crisis—published jointly in the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and JCO Oncology Practice.

Released: 7-Apr-2020 12:05 AM EDT
ASRA Recognizes Eight Trailblazers as Part of the Year of Women in ASRA
American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)

Eight trailblazing women in regional anesthesia and pain medicine are being honored for their achievements and contributions to the field as part of the ASRA Trailblazer Awards. Created to acknowledge potential for bias in the past, the program is part of the “Year of Women in ASRA,” so named by ASRA President Dr. Eugene Viscusi. Other components of the campaign include year-round highlights of prominent women in the field on the ASRA website and social media channels, greater recognition of gender disparities at meetings, improved data collection to continue to assess our progress representing the field, and, most importantly, development of an organizational plan to identify and correct disparities across all minority groups.

Newswise: Not Too Young for Knee Replacement
Released: 3-Apr-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Not Too Young for Knee Replacement
Hospital for Special Surgery

Advances in knee replacement surgery, such as robotic-assisted surgery and improvements in implant design and materials, make it a viable option for younger patients seeking pain relief.

Newswise: Mindfulness an Effective Treatment for Migraines
Released: 3-Apr-2020 4:35 PM EDT
Mindfulness an Effective Treatment for Migraines
University of Maryland, Baltimore

In an article published March 13, 2020 in the journal Pain, David A. Seminowicz, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Neural and Pain Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, and coauthors show how mindfulness can help in the fight against migraines.


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