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Article ID: 709771

Ultrasound Provides Precise, Minimally Invasive Way to Measure Heart Function in Children

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

Currently, a practical, precise, minimally invasive way to measure cardiac output or heart function in children undergoing surgery does not exist. New research published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), illustrates how a novel minimally invasive method using catheter-based ultrasound to measure heart function performed with similar precision to a traditional highly invasive device.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709769

A new battle: Veterans more likely to have heart disease

University of Central Florida

After the war is over, veterans face a new threat. They are more likely to have heart disease at a younger age than nonveterans, and this could herald a new health crisis on the horizon.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 2:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709744

Interventional cardiologist/investigator: Low-risk TAVR results 'one of the most groundbreaking days' in career for impact on patient care

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Stanley Chetcuti, M.D., co-author on the Evolut trial of low-risk TAVR/ interventional cardiologist at Michigan Medicine (University of Michigan) comments on importance of both late-breaking clinical trials re: low-risk TAVR (Evolut and Partner 3) at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Mar-2019 9:25 AM EDT

Article ID: 709078

Researchers Find Eight New Unique Gene Mutations in Patients with Hereditable Heart Muscle Disease

Intermountain Healthcare

In a new study from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have identified eight new gene mutations that may cause or contribute to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease not caused by known external influences, such as high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, or diseased coronary arteries.

Released:
5-Mar-2019 7:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 709715

2019 Updated Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Guidelines Announced

Johns Hopkins Medicine

A working group including Johns Hopkins Medicine cardiologists and American Heart Association (AHA) and American College of Cardiology (ACC) colleagues released updated guidelines for clinicians and patients on the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Primary prevention means the person doesn’t have any clinical symptoms yet, but the guidelines are designed to prevent a future first heart attack, stroke, heart failure and atrial fibrillation.

Released:
17-Mar-2019 3:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Mar-2019 11:45 AM EDT

Article ID: 709622

Absorbable Antibiotic Envelope Can Significantly Cut Cardiac Device Infections, Cleveland Clinic Study Shows

Cleveland Clinic

A Cleveland Clinic-led research team has found that using an absorbable, antibiotic-eluting envelope when implanting cardiac devices like pacemakers and defibrillators can cut the rate of major infections by 40 percent. The research was presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session and simultaneously published in the New England Journal of Medicine. It will also be presented tomorrow at the European Heart Rhythm Association 2019 Congress.

Released:
14-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Mar-2019 4:45 PM EDT

Article ID: 708996

Cardiac Procedure Reduces Risk of Dementia in Patients with A-Fib and Carotid Artery Disease Better Than Medications

Intermountain Healthcare

In a new study from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers found that performing catheter ablations on patients who suffer from both atrial fibrillation and carotid arterial disease reduces the risk of dementia and stroke compared to managing their care with medications.

Released:
4-Mar-2019 6:05 AM EST

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