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Changing what heart cells eat could help them regenerate

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Switching what the powerhouses of heart cells consume for energy could help the heart regenerate when cells die.

Channels: All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Pharmaceuticals,

Released:
21-Feb-2020 4:20 PM EST

Study Finds Certain Genetic Test Not Useful in Predicting Heart Disease Risk

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

A Polygenic Risk Score — a genetic assessment that doctors have hoped could predict coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients — has been found not to be a useful predictive biomarker for disease risk, according to a Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Channels: All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Genetics, Heart Disease, Public Health, JAMA, Staff Picks,

Released:
21-Feb-2020 10:25 AM EST
Research Results
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The fat around your arteries may actually keep them healthy

Michigan State University

A Michigan State University researcher is adding new evidence to the argument that the fat around our arteries may play an important role in keeping those blood vessels healthy. The finding could affect how researchers test for treatments related to plaque buildup in our arteries, or atherosclerosis, an issue that can often lead to a heart attack, which is currently a leading cause of death in the United States.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Scientific Reports, Heart Disease, Staff Picks, All Journal News,

Released:
20-Feb-2020 4:50 PM EST
Research Results
Embargo will expire:
24-Feb-2020 12:05 AM EST
Released to reporters:
20-Feb-2020 2:00 PM EST

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Research Results
Newswise: The Medical Minute: How much should I worry about that ‘extra’ heartbeat?

The Medical Minute: How much should I worry about that ‘extra’ heartbeat?

Penn State Health

For people who feel premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), they can seem frightening. But the good news is they’re very common – and they’re not always dangerous.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Public Health,

Released:
20-Feb-2020 10:35 AM EST
Research Results
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دراسة من Mayo Clinic: الفحص الوعائي المبكِّر عامل رئيسي للحد من خطورة إصابات النساء بأمراض القلب

Mayo Clinic

ثمة اختلاف في الطريقة التي يشيُّخ فيها نظام الأوعية الدموية ومعدَّل تقدُّم مرض تصلُّب الشرايين (زيادة سُمك جدران الشريان أو تكوُّن الانسداد الشرياني) بين الرجال والنساء مع مرور الوقت وتؤثر هذه الاختلافات المرتبطة بالنوع والعمر بشكل مباشر على عوامل إصابة النساء بالأمراض القلبية الوعائية.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Women's Health,

Released:
20-Feb-2020 8:20 AM EST
Feature Tip Sheet
Newswise: UCI researchers reveal how low oxygen levels in the heart predispose people to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias

UCI researchers reveal how low oxygen levels in the heart predispose people to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias

University of California, Irvine

Low oxygen levels in the heart have long been known to produce life-threatening arrhythmias, even sudden death. Until now, it was not clear how. New findings, in a study led by Steve A. N. Goldstein, MD, PhD, vice chancellor for Health Affairs at the University of California, Irvine, and distinguished professor in the UCI School of Medicine Departments of Pediatrics and Physiology & Biophysics, reveal the underlying mechanism for this dangerous heart disorder.

Channels: All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Children's Health, Heart Disease, Public Health, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
18-Feb-2020 3:30 PM EST
Announcement
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Mayo researchers create, test AI to improve EKG testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Mayo Clinic

An approach based on artificial intelligence (AI) may allow EKGs to be used to screen for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the future. With hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the heart walls become thick and may interfere with the heart's ability to function properly. The disease also predisposes some patients to potentially fatal abnormal rhythms. Current EKG technology has limited diagnostic yield for this disease.

Channels: All Journal News, Artificial Intelligence, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Public Health,

Released:
18-Feb-2020 12:30 PM EST
Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2020 11:00 AM EST

Traditional risk factors predict heart disease about as well as sophisticated genetic test, study suggests

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Traditional cardiovascular risk factors often assessed in an annual physical, such as blood pressure, cholesterol levels, diabetes, and smoking status, are at least as valuable in predicting who will develop coronary heart disease (CHD) as a sophisticated genetic test that surveys millions of different points in DNA.

Channels: All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Genetics, Heart Disease, JAMA, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Nature (journal),

Released:
17-Feb-2020 2:05 PM EST
Research Results


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