Life News (Social & Behavioral Sciences)

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Released: 26-Jul-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Misplaced Trust: When Trust in Science Fosters Pseudoscience
Annenberg Public Policy Center

The Covid-19 pandemic and the politicization of health-prevention measures such as vaccination and mask-wearing have highlighted the need for people to accept and trust science.

Released: 26-Jul-2021 1:00 PM EDT
New Study Finds that Countries’ Wealth Inequality is Independent from Income Inequality and Linked to the Distribution of Housing Equity
American Sociological Association (ASA)

A new study in the American Sociological Review shows that comparing countries in terms of their wealth inequality instead of income inequality provides a fundamentally different picture of nations’ relative level of economic inequality.

Released: 26-Jul-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Healing Trauma: Research Links PTSD, Emotion Regulation and Quality of Life
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Research from Binghamton University, State University of New York provides insight into the impact PTSD has on emotional regulation and quality of life, and points to ways to improve both.

Newswise: Depression Isn’t Crying in the Corner
Released: 26-Jul-2021 10:30 AM EDT
Depression Isn’t Crying in the Corner
West Virginia University

Kayla Follmer, assistant professor of management in the WVU John Chambers College of Business and Economics, recognized that mental illness can be a concealable identity, much like religious affiliation, sexual orientation or having conditions such as HIV or diabetes: you can’t always see it from the outside.

Newswise: Appropriate Technologies: The COVID-19-Era Heroes Yet to Come to “Center Stage”
Released: 26-Jul-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Appropriate Technologies: The COVID-19-Era Heroes Yet to Come to “Center Stage”
Chulalongkorn University

The COVID-19 outbreaks in Thailand have seen an ever-increasing number of infections as new clusters are emerging. The faculty members of Sasin School of Management — Prof. Dr. Kua Wongboonsin, Asst. Prof. Dr. Piyachart Phiromswad, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Pattanaporn Chatjuthamard, Asst. Prof. Dr. Pattarake Sarajoti, and Asst. Prof. Dr. Sabin Srivannaboon, with financial support from the National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT), jointly present ways to reduce the spread of COVID-19 sustainably in a study to identify technologies that can instantly and appropriately help professionals who find social distancing difficult.

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Released: 23-Jul-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Meeting Global Climate Targets Will Lead to 8 Million More Energy Jobs Worldwide by 2050
Cell Press

Researchers created a global dataset of job footprints in 50 countries and used a model to investigate how trying to meet the Paris Agreement global climate target of staying well below 2°C would affect energy sector jobs.

Released: 23-Jul-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Americans with Higher Net Worth at Midlife Tend to Live Longer
Northwestern University

One of the keys to a long life may lie in your net worth.

Released: 23-Jul-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Studies Examine Different Understandings, Varieties of Diversity
University of Illinois Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago researchers detail findings from three studies that explore the connection between political ideology, attitudes, and beliefs toward diversity

Newswise: Four Themes Identified as Contributors to Feelings of Despair in Pennsylvania Communities
22-Jul-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Four Themes Identified as Contributors to Feelings of Despair in Pennsylvania Communities
Penn State Health

Financial instability, lack of infrastructure, a deteriorating sense of community and family fragmentation are key contributors to diseases of despair in Pennsylvania communities, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Highmark Health researchers.

Newswise: Public Health Researchers Show That Strong Social Support Networks in Chinese and Korean American Communities Equates to Healthier, Happier Individuals
Released: 22-Jul-2021 7:05 PM EDT
Public Health Researchers Show That Strong Social Support Networks in Chinese and Korean American Communities Equates to Healthier, Happier Individuals
University of California, Irvine

In a study published in the journal Social Science and Medicine, a research team from the University of California, Irvine Program in Public Health and School of Medicine were able to show that in Chinese and Korean American populations, having a strong social support network significantly increases an individuals’ self-reported health and well-being.

Released: 22-Jul-2021 2:40 PM EDT
New Map Shows Where Millions of UK Residents Struggle to Access Food
University of Sheffield

In one out of every six local authorities, rates of hunger are more than 150 per cent (one and a half times) the national average.

Newswise: Mothers May Face Increased Workplace Discrimination Post-Pandemic, Research Warns
Released: 21-Jul-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Mothers May Face Increased Workplace Discrimination Post-Pandemic, Research Warns
Washington University in St. Louis

Inflexible schedules and biased hiring practices, combined with gendered cultural norms around breadwinning and caregiving, lead to discrimination against mothers and perpetuate existing gender inequalities in the workplace, finds two new studies from Washington University in St. Louis.

Released: 21-Jul-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Awareness Without a Sense of Self
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

In the context of meditation practice, meditators can experience a state of "pure awareness" or "pure consciousness", in which they perceive consciousness itself.

Released: 21-Jul-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Patients May Face Barriers Due to Race, Ethnicity and Language at Hospital Discharge
Massachusetts General Hospital

A new study by research, quality improvement and health equity experts at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in The American Journal of Managed Care lays out the challenges of achieving equity for diverse patients in communication at hospital discharge.

20-Jul-2021 7:00 PM EDT
City-Funded Housing Repairs in Low-Income Neighborhoods Associated with Drop in Crime
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In Philadelphia, when a home received repairs through a city-funded program, total crime dropped by 21.9% on that block, and as the number of repaired houses on a block increased, instances of crime fell even further, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published today in JAMA Network Open.

Newswise: SLU Researchers Awarded $1.8 Million Grant to Help Improve Behavioral Health Services for Children, Adolescents
Released: 21-Jul-2021 9:20 AM EDT
SLU Researchers Awarded $1.8 Million Grant to Help Improve Behavioral Health Services for Children, Adolescents
Saint Louis University Medical Center

A team of researchers from Saint Louis University has received a new, four-year $1.8 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to establish the Integrated Behavioral Health Practice Fellowship for Children and Youth.

Released: 20-Jul-2021 5:10 PM EDT
Vaccine acceptance higher in developing nations than U.S.
Cornell University

Willingness to get a COVID-19 vaccine was considerably higher in developing countries than in the United States and Russia, according to new research.

Released: 20-Jul-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Community Involvement in Natural Resource Management Leads to Less Overexploitation
Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

A Special Feature of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that when government or nonprofit organizations encourage a community’s involvement in the managing of local environmental resources, the accountability of local leaders to the citizenry increases and the overexploitation of “common pool” natural resources such as forests and water decreases.

Newswise: Study Explores Disparities in COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy and Potential Ways to Reduce It
Released: 20-Jul-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Study Explores Disparities in COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy and Potential Ways to Reduce It
Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

A new study co-authored by a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School identified behavioral patterns associated with reluctance among some adults for taking the COVID-19 vaccine. The study, conducted among adults in China, suggests that information about the vaccination behaviors of people whom one personally knows can be more influential in changing the individual’s vaccine hesitancy than information about vaccine use among the general public.

Newswise: Archives of Pioneering Neuropsychiatrist Available for Review at UIC
Released: 20-Jul-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Archives of Pioneering Neuropsychiatrist Available for Review at UIC
University of Illinois Chicago

The papers focus on the professor from his experience in WWI through the creation and growth of Recovery International.

Released: 20-Jul-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Childhood Exposure to Gun Violence Increases Risk of Violent Behavior as Adults
University of Michigan

Witnessing gun violence in real life or in fiction can have a mental toll on children. The effects, including using guns themselves, sometimes are seen many years later, according to a new University of Michigan study that tracked individuals during a 10-year span.

Newswise: ‘Service with a Smile’ Plus Tipping Leads to Sexual Harassment for Majority of Service Employees, Study Shows
Released: 19-Jul-2021 4:45 PM EDT
‘Service with a Smile’ Plus Tipping Leads to Sexual Harassment for Majority of Service Employees, Study Shows
University of Notre Dame

Two common practices in the U.S. restaurant industry — service with a smile and tipping — contribute to a culture of sexual harassment, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.

Released: 19-Jul-2021 4:20 PM EDT
Have Something To Say? Your Boss Wants You to Do it in Private.
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

New research finds that employees feel comfortable speaking up in open forums, but managers prefer that employees speak truth to power in a closed-door discussion instead of in front of a group. The forthcoming study gives insight for both sides to productively address this dynamic.

Released: 19-Jul-2021 2:15 PM EDT
Sociologists to Explore Topics of Racism, White Supremacy, Nationalism, Critical Race Theory, and More at ASA Virtual Annual Meeting, Aug. 6-10; Press Registration Open
American Sociological Association (ASA)

Thousands of sociologists whose work provides insights on vital topics such as race and racism, white nationalism, critical race theory, impacts of the pandemic, and issues confronting Asian-Americans, will meet at the American Sociological Association’s Virtual Annual Meeting, August 6-10. Approximately 900 sessions featuring over 3,000 research papers are open to the press.

Released: 19-Jul-2021 11:10 AM EDT
More Bullying of LGBTQ+ Students in Politically Conservative Districts
Washington State University

Students who identify as LGBTQ+ in Washington state school districts with conservative voting records reported experiencing more bullying than their peers in more politically liberal areas, according to a new study.

Released: 19-Jul-2021 8:40 AM EDT
COVID-19 Made Unequal Access to Food Worse, Study Suggests
Ohio State University

Long before COVID-19, low-income people had few options for buying healthy, fresh food. New research showed that pandemic only made the situation worse.

14-Jul-2021 6:05 AM EDT
Peer-Rejected Rats Aid Study of Alcohol Relapse in Women
Research Society on Alcoholism

Rejection of adolescent female rats by their peers has long-term effects on alcohol-seeking behavior, according to a study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, and could provide a tool for studying alcohol relapse in humans. There is growing evidence from experimental studies that women who had adverse social experiences in childhood are more susceptible to alcohol relapse following abstinence. This is not observed in men, despite men having higher rates of alcohol dependence overall. Laboratory-bred rodents are important for studying the molecular and neurobiological underpinnings of addiction and alcohol dependence, but few animal studies have assessed the sex-dependent effects of adverse social experiences on later alcohol-seeking behavior. Recently, researchers in Germany have developed a rat model for adolescent peer rejection which has allowed them to study the long-term consequences of these experiences in adult male and female rats.

Newswise: Promoting Physical Activity Is Key to Achieving U.N. Sustainable Development Goals
Released: 16-Jul-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Promoting Physical Activity Is Key to Achieving U.N. Sustainable Development Goals
Washington University in St. Louis

New evidence supports integrating strategies to promote increased physical activity as a key part of the action plan for achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, finds a new study led by researchers at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Released: 16-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Food Insufficiency Linked to Lack of Mental Health Services During Pandemic
University of Toronto

A new national study published in Public Health Nutrition on July 15 found that Americans experiencing food insufficiency were three times as likely to lack mental health support during the COVID-19 pandemic than those not experiencing food insufficiency.

Released: 16-Jul-2021 12:35 PM EDT
On the Internet, Nobody Knows You’re a Dog – or a Fake Russian Twitter Account
University at Buffalo

This study investigates how successful Russian Internet Research Agency Twitter accounts built the followings that were central to their disinformation campaigns around the 2016 US presidential election. Many legacy media outlets played an unwitting role in the growth, according to the findings.

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Released: 16-Jul-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Self-Reliance Index Offers Opportunity to Track Sustainable, Longer-Term Progress for Refugees
Washington University in St. Louis

To help address gaps in measurement and provide organizations with a tool to track the self-reliance of refugees and other displaced populations over time, researchers at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis have developed a Self-Reliance Index.

Released: 16-Jul-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Race, Politics Divide Americans on Sports Issues
Ohio State University

Although some people may yearn for sports to be free of political or racial divisiveness, a new study shows how impossible that dream may be.

Released: 15-Jul-2021 4:25 PM EDT
Stakeholders' Sentiment Can Make or Break a New CEO
BOCCONI UNIVERSITY

When a CEO steps down or is dismissed, the attention of the board is on how to choose the right executive to succeed that CEO.

Released: 15-Jul-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Awarding $150,000 in Grants This Summer, Southland Rise Boosts Annual Support for Community Programs That Keep Youth Safe
University of Chicago Medical Center

Through Southland RISE – the violence prevention and trauma care collaboration between Advocate Health Care, the University of Chicago Medicine and community partners – 30 community-based organizations on the South Side have received $350,000 for their summer youth programs since 2019.

Released: 15-Jul-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Pandemic Layoffs Pushed Hospitality Workers to Leave Industry
Washington State University

The psychological toll of losing a job due to COVID-19 caused many young hotel and restaurant workers to consider changing careers, according to a Washington State University study.

Released: 15-Jul-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Even on Facebook, COVID-19 Polarized Members of U.S. Congress
Ohio State University

Facebook posts by members of the U.S. Congress reveal the depth of the partisan divide over the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.

14-Jul-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Black, Latinx People Confident in COVID-19 Safety Precautions but Skeptical About Vaccines
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Black and Latinx people intensely sought information on COVID-19 and engaged in public health measures such as mask-wearing and testing due to devastating experiences during the pandemic but are still skeptical about vaccines, according to a Rutgers study.

Released: 15-Jul-2021 9:55 AM EDT
UAlbany Receives $1 Million NSF Grant to Boost Gender Equity among STEM Faculty
University at Albany, State University of New York

The University at Albany has received a prestigious $1 million, three-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to create an academic and research climate where women faculty in STEM fields can thrive and develop their careers to the fullest potential.

Released: 15-Jul-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Study Highlights How Resilience is Dynamic, Not a Static Character Trait
North Carolina State University

A new study finds that resilience is a dynamic process, rather than a fixed trait – and suggests this may have significant ramifications for the business world.

Released: 14-Jul-2021 4:45 PM EDT
How Does The World Use Emojis?
University of Southern California (USC)

Before Millennials were over laugh-cry emojis, they were the most used emojis across the world, according to researchers at USC.

Released: 14-Jul-2021 4:25 PM EDT
Vaccine Hesitancy In Young Adults May Hamper Herd Immunity
University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

Vaccine skepticism among young adults may stall efforts to achieve herd immunity - a threshold in which approximately 80 percent of a population is vaccinated against the coronavirus.

Released: 14-Jul-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Adult Children with College Degrees Influence Parents’ Health in Later Life
University at Buffalo

Having no children who completed college is negatively associated with parents' self-rated health and positively associated with depressive symptoms. Additionally, among parents with the highest propensity for having no children who complete college, the consequences on depressive symptoms are greatest.

Newswise: Interactive Media Reduce Negative Reactions to Health Messages, Boost Compliance
Released: 14-Jul-2021 10:20 AM EDT
Interactive Media Reduce Negative Reactions to Health Messages, Boost Compliance
Penn State Institute for Computational and Data Sciences

People often react negatively to health messages because they tend to dictate what we can and cannot do, but new research reveals that interactive media can soften negative reactions -- or reactance -- to health messages that are distributed online.

Newswise: “Get out of the water!” Monster shark movies massacre shark conservation
Released: 13-Jul-2021 9:05 PM EDT
“Get out of the water!” Monster shark movies massacre shark conservation
University of South Australia

Undeniably the shark movie to end all shark movies, the 1975 blockbuster, Jaws, not only smashed box office expectations, but forever changed the way we felt about going into the water – and how we think about sharks.

Released: 13-Jul-2021 5:55 PM EDT
The impact of COVID-19 on food-shopping behavior for food-insecure populations
University of Connecticut

The COVID-19 pandemic changed just about every aspect of normal life, including how we bought food.

Released: 13-Jul-2021 5:25 PM EDT
What you say in the first minute after a vaccine can be key in reducing a child's distress
York University

As we look forward to a fall with hopefully one of the most important vaccination uptakes of children in a generation, a new study provides insights to help parents with reducing post-vaccination distress in younger kids.

Newswise: Ask an Expert: Have Drivers Gotten Worse Since COVID?
Released: 13-Jul-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Ask an Expert: Have Drivers Gotten Worse Since COVID?
SUNY Buffalo State College

As the restrictions around COVID-19 are lifted, and more and more people hit the road to return to their work spaces and routines, you may have heard a familiar refrain: “People have forgotten how to drive.” Is it true? Are drivers worse now than they were before the coronavirus pandemic took over the world? The answer, according to Dwight A. Hennessy, department chair and professor of psychology at Buffalo State College, is probably not.

Released: 13-Jul-2021 6:05 AM EDT
Highlighting the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines could hold key to converting doubters
University of Bristol

Informing people about how well the new COVID-19 vaccines work could boost uptake among doubters substantially, according to new research.


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