Life News (Social & Behavioral Sciences)

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30-Jun-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Cutting Down But Not Out: Very-Heavy Drinkers Needn’t Quit Completely for Cardiovascular Benefit
Research Society on Alcoholism

High-risk drinkers who substantially reduce their alcohol use can lower their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) despite not completely abstaining, according to study findings published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. CVD encompasses a range of conditions involving the heart or blood vessels, and is the leading cause of death in the US. It is also one of many negative health outcomes associated with heavy drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD). Reductions in drinking can be defined using World Health Organization (WHO) ‘risk drinking levels’, which classify drinkers into ‘very high’, ‘high’, ‘moderate’ and ‘low’ risk categories based on their average daily alcohol consumption. Previous research has shown that a reduction of two or more levels (for example, from ‘very high’ to ‘moderate’) can lower the risk of multiple health issues, but did not assess the impact on CVD specifically. The latest study has examined associations between reductions in WHO risk drinking

Released: 2-Jul-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Study: Crowdsourced Data Could Help Map Urban Food Deserts
University of Texas at Dallas

New research from The University of Texas at Dallas suggests food deserts might be more prevalent in the U.S. than the numbers reported in government estimates.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19
University of Kent

Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Stemming the Spread of Misinformation on Social Media
Association for Psychological Science

New research reported in the journal Psychological Science finds that priming people to think about accuracy could make them more discerning in what they subsequently share on social media.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Prospective teachers misperceive Black children as angry
American Psychological Association (APA)

Prospective teachers appear more likely to misperceive Black children as angry than white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Newswise: Mothering in domestic violence: protecting children behind closed doors
Released: 2-Jul-2020 7:05 AM EDT
Mothering in domestic violence: protecting children behind closed doors
University of South Australia

As emerging data shows an alarming rise of domestic violence during the pandemic, researchers at the University of South Australia are urging practitioners to look beyond clinical observations and focus on the strengths that mothers exercise to protect their children from domestic abuse.

29-Jun-2020 7:10 AM EDT
Men More Likely than Women to be Seen as Brilliant
New York University

Men are more likely than are women to be seen as “brilliant,” finds a new study measuring global perceptions linked to gender. The work concludes that these stereotyped views are an instance of implicit bias, revealing automatic associations that people cannot, or at least do not, report holding when asked directly.

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Released: 1-Jul-2020 2:45 PM EDT
How to bring conservation messaging into wildlife-based tourism
University of Helsinki

The study states that failing to encourage tourists to do more on behalf of wildlife represents a missed opportunity for conservation.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Little Rock Congregations Study shows more clergy are concerned about race relations
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Research from the Little Rock Congregations Study at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock shows that religious leaders in Little Rock are growing more concerned with the issue of race relations.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
School absenteeism has surprising consequences for adults
Ohio State University

Kids who miss a lot of school from kindergarten to eighth grade may suffer unexpected costs as young adults, a new study finds. Researchers found that those who were more regularly absent in these early years of school were less likely to vote and reported more economic difficulties when they were 22-23 years old.

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Released: 30-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Brown School’s Race and Opportunity Lab recommends specific policing reforms
Washington University in St. Louis

As the nation struggles with police violence, a new report from HomeGrown StL in the Race and Opportunity Lab at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis recommends reforms to build an equitable, transparent and accountable public safety approach that will include lawsuit liability, a police misconduct database and federal funding mandates.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Even when women outnumber men, gender bias persists among science undergrads
Colorado State University

Increasing gender diversity has been a long-sought goal across many of the sciences, and interventions and programs to attract more women into fields like physics and math often happen at the undergraduate level.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Nearly half of US youth have been stalked/harassed by partners
Boston University School of Medicine

A new, first-of-its-kind Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that 48% of 12-18-year-olds who have been in a relationship have been stalked or harassed by a partner, and 42% have stalked or harassed a partner.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Older adults share fewer memories as they age
University of Arizona

By the time people reach a certain age, they've accumulated enough life experience to have plenty of stories to tell about life "back in their day."

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Study: New leaders emerge as organizations go to virtual work spaces
Brigham Young University

When work meetings shifted online this spring, some may have noticed new standouts among their colleagues. According to new research, members of virtual teams identify leaders in significantly different ways compared to members of in-person teams.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:10 AM EDT
The price of taking a stance: How corporate sociopolitical activism impacts bottom line
University of Arizona

As the political climate in the United States becomes increasingly charged, some businesses are looking to have their voices heard on controversial issues.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:40 PM EDT
It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ... or is it?
Michigan State University

Contrary to what many would think, characteristics of your neighborhood have little to do with how satisfied you are with it, Michigan State University research found.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Researchers Uncover Effects of Negative Stereotype Exposure on the Brain
University of California, Santa Barbara

“It is clear that people who belong to historically marginalized groups in the United States contend with burdensome stressors on top of the everyday stressors that members of non-disadvantaged groups experience."

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Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Native Amazonians, Americans and monkeys show similar thinking patterns
University of California, Berkeley

Humans and monkeys may not speak the same lingo, but our ways of thinking are a lot more similar than previously thought, according to new research from UC Berkeley, Harvard University and Carnegie Mellon University.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Coronavirus: Social distancing accepted when people understand exponential growth
University of Cologne

Researchers from the Social Cognition Center Cologne at the University of Cologne and from the University of Bremen report that participants in three experiments, each involving more than 500 adults in the United States, tended to assume the number of COVID-19 cases grew linearly with time, rather than exponentially.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 3:35 PM EDT
$2.7 million gift by Arnold Ventures to UCI funds most comprehensive prison violence study to date
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 29, 2020 — The University of California, Irvine has received a $2.7 million gift by Arnold Ventures to conduct the most comprehensive study to date into the sources and consequences of prison violence in seven states. Findings from the three-year, multi-strategy investigation will be used to create an evidence-based framework for reducing and preventing incidents of violence.

Newswise: People Feel More Grateful for a ‘Special Favor’ — One Only for Themselves — Than They Do for a Group Benefit
Released: 29-Jun-2020 2:20 PM EDT
People Feel More Grateful for a ‘Special Favor’ — One Only for Themselves — Than They Do for a Group Benefit
Baylor University

People felt less gratitude when they read about receiving a favor along with many other individuals, as opposed to a favor that was only given to themselves, according to a Baylor University study. This is because people tend to think that benefactors who help them as individuals care more about them, specifically, compared to benefactors who help them in a group.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19
University of Kent

Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Newswise: Studies examine how race affects perceptions of law-involved Blacks, school discipline
Released: 29-Jun-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Studies examine how race affects perceptions of law-involved Blacks, school discipline
University of Illinois at Chicago

The extent of discriminatory treatment Black adults and children experience at every point of contact within the legal system and the biases that result in Black children’s behavior being managed more harshly in school are detailed in two new analyses from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Supporting LGBTQ+ youth who are Black, Indigenous and people of color
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Youth who are Black, Indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) that also identify as LGBTQ+ representation of sexual orientations and gender identities experience higher rates of social discrimination and isolation, including bullying, family rejection and a lack of social support. Here are ways that family and friends can support them.

Released: 26-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Helping consumers in a crisis
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

A new study shows that the central bank tool known as quantitative easing helped consumers substantially during the last big economic downturn -- a finding with clear relevance for today's pandemic-hit economy.

Released: 26-Jun-2020 12:05 PM EDT
How conspiracy theories emerge -- and how their storylines fall apart
University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)

A new study by UCLA professors offers a new way to understand how unfounded conspiracy theories emerge online.

25-Jun-2020 7:05 AM EDT
Planning for a growing elderly population
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new study investigated the prevalence of activity limitations among older adults in 23 low- and middle-income countries, to help policymakers prepare for the challenges associated with the world’s aging population.

Newswise: Comedy Can Help Change the World, Rutgers Researcher Says
Released: 25-Jun-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Comedy Can Help Change the World, Rutgers Researcher Says
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Comedy can play an important role in challenging people to address critical social issues, says Lauren Feldman, associate professor at Rutgers’ School of Communication and Information.

Released: 25-Jun-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Confrontation May Reduce White Prejudices, Rutgers Study Finds
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Confronting a white person who makes a racist or sexist statement can make them reflect on their words and avoid making biased statements about race or gender in the future, Rutgers researchers find.

Newswise: Weight stigma can be harmful to many, including marginalized identities
Released: 25-Jun-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Weight stigma can be harmful to many, including marginalized identities
University of Georgia

Weight-inclusive care prioritizes well-being over weight and having access to non-stigmatizing health care.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 25-Jun-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Newswise: Uganda’s Ik are not Unbelievably Selfish and Mean
Released: 25-Jun-2020 6:00 AM EDT
Uganda’s Ik are not Unbelievably Selfish and Mean
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The Ik, a small ethnic group in Uganda, are not incredibly selfish and mean as portrayed in a 1972 book by a prominent anthropologist, according to a Rutgers-led study. Instead, the Ik are quite cooperative and generous with one another, and their culture features many traits that encourage generosity.

Released: 24-Jun-2020 6:25 PM EDT
Twitter posts reveal polarization in Congress on COVID-19
Ohio State University

The rapid politicization of the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen in messages members of the U.S. Congress sent about the issue on the social media site Twitter, a new analysis found.

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22-Jun-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Analysis of rates of police-related fatalities finds significant differences between Black and White people, and significant variation across metropolitan areas
PLOS

A study analyzing and describing US police-involved fatalities across racial/ethnic groups at the level of individual metropolitan statistical areas publishes June 24, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, by Gabriel Schwartz and Jaquelyn Jahn from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Newswise: After the Protests: How Communities Can Make Systemic Change
Released: 24-Jun-2020 10:30 AM EDT
After the Protests: How Communities Can Make Systemic Change
Furman University

How Black Lives Matter commemorations can create lasting change in communities

Released: 24-Jun-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Rutgers Program Elevates Women of Color in the Worker Justice Movement
Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR)

The Rutgers Center for Innovation in Worker Organization (CIWO), with support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, today expanded a nationwide initiative to elevate more women and people of color—especially women of color—to leadership positions in unions, worker centers, and community-based organizations.

Released: 23-Jun-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Decline in green energy spending might offset COVID-era emissions benefits
Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

The short-term environmental benefits of the COVID-19 crisis, including declines in carbon emissions and local air pollution, have been documented since the early days of the crisis.

Released: 23-Jun-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Does Bedtime Media Use Harm Children’s Sleep? Only if They Struggle to Self-Regulate Behavior
Association for Psychological Science

New research reveals that media use before bedtime translates to less sleep for children who generally struggle to self-regulate their behavior.

18-Jun-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Researchers Unravel the Ways Income and Liquor Stores are Related to Neighborhood Drinking
Research Society on Alcoholism

Residents of wealthier neighborhoods drink alcohol twice as frequently as people in poorer areas, a new study suggests. The neighborhood environment is known to be associated with alcohol use. But the separate effects of various factors — for example, average income and the number of off-sales outlets — are complex, situational, and difficult to unravel. A new study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research demonstrates a sampling technique that isolates these influences. It explores how certain individual characteristics interacted with certain neighborhood characteristics among 984 survey respondents.

Released: 23-Jun-2020 8:40 AM EDT
Role-play shows which expectant dads will thrive as new fathers
Ohio State University

A five-minute role-play done with men before the birth of their first child predicted the quality of their parenting after the baby arrived, a new study showed.

Released: 22-Jun-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Challenging yet positive parenting style benefits children's development
University of Michigan

When one talks about parenting, an image of the sensitive, caring mother—but not father—responding to a young child's emotional needs often comes to mind.


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