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Lake Trout Adjust Their Behaviour in the Face of a Changing Climate, New Study

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Canadian scientists have discovered that certain lake predators are altering their behaviour due to climate change, revealing what the future may hold for these fish and their food.

Science

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Evolution, population history, admixture, Neanderthal, Denisovan, Human Evolution, archaic, DNA

New Look at Archaic DNA Rewrites Human Evolution Story

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A U-led team developed a method for analyzing DNA sequence data to reconstruct early history of archaic human populations, revealing an evolutionary story that contradicts conventional wisdom about modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans. The Neanderthal-Denisovan lineage nearly went extinct after separating from modern humans. Just 300 generations later, Neanderthals and Denisovans diverged around 744,000 years ago. The global Neanderthal population grew to tens of thousands of individuals living in fragmented, isolated populations.

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Marriage of Microscopy Techniques Reveals 3D Structure of Critical Protein Complex

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Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have solved the three-dimensional structure of a complex that is essential for the correct sorting of chromosomes into eggs and sperm during reproductive cell division or meiosis.

Science

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Kansas State University, K-State, KSU, Keith Gido, fish, Aquatic, Streams, Drought, Ecology, Groundwater

Fish Out of Water: Loss of 350 Miles of Great Plains Streams Causing Changes in Aquatic Food Web

A decrease in Great Plains streams, fed by decreasing ground water, is changing fish assembles according to research published Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Medicine

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Staph, Photodynamic Therapy

Investigators Use Light to Kill Microbial ‘Vampires’

If S. aureus is going to drink our blood like a vampire, let's kill it with sunlight

Science

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materials sciences, Semiconductor

A Semiconductor That Can Beat the Heat

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A newly discovered collective rattling effect in a type of crystalline semiconductor blocks most heat transfer while preserving high electrical conductivity – a rare pairing that scientists say could reduce heat buildup in electronic devices and turbine engines, among other possible applications.

Medicine

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Propagation, Light, Brain Surgery

Shedding Light Deeper Into the Human Brain

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Dr. Vladislav Yakovlev, professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University, has been developing a more efficient way of propagating light through an opaque medium. Propagation of light refers to the way that light travels from one point to another, in this case, through a medium, such as human tissue.

Science

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Emissions, Nitric Oxide, Nitrous Oxide, Greenhouse Gas, Fertilization, Kyle Lancaster, Jonathan Caranto

Cornell Researchers Uncover Fresh Role for Nitric Oxide

Cornell University chemists have uncovered a fresh role for nitric oxide that could send biochemical textbooks back for revision.

Medicine

Science

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Jeffrey Mumm, eye, Immune System, Zebrafish

Immune System Found to Control Eye Tissue Renewal in Zebrafish

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report evidence that zebrafishes’ natural ability to regenerate their eyes’ retinal tissue can be accelerated by controlling the fishes’ immune systems. Because evolution likely conserved this mechanism of regenerative potential in other animals, the new findings may one day advance efforts to combat degenerative eye disease damage in humans.

Life

Education

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big data analytics , Nepotism, nepotism in Italian academics, common names in scientific fields

What's in a Name? Big Data Approach Reveals Distinctive Patterns in Higher Education Systems

Using lists of names collected from publicly available websites, two University of Chicago researchers have revealed distinctive patterns in higher education systems, ranging from ethnic representation, to gender imbalance in the sciences, to nepotism in Italian universities.







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