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Medicine

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Psychology, Memory, Psychiatry, Hippocampus, Episodic Memory, Neuroscience, Neurobiology

How Your Brain Remembers What You Had for Dinner Last Night

Confirming earlier computational models, researchers at University of California San Diego and UC San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Arizona and Louisiana, report that episodic memories are encoded in the hippocampus of the human brain by distinct, sparse sets of neurons.

Science

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Climate Change, SNOW, Snowmelt , Humidity, Ablation, Sublimation

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Jan-2018 3:00 PM EST

Science

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Superlattice, X-rays, Synchrotron, Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LBNL, Berkeley Lab, Advanced Light Source, Molecular Foundry, Chirality, Handedness, vorticity

X-Rays Reveal ‘Handedness’ in Swirling Electric Vortices

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Scientists used spiraling X-rays at Berkeley Lab to observe, for the first time, a property that gives left- or right-handedness to swirling electric patterns – dubbed polar vortices – in a layered material called a superlattice.

Science

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Seismology, Montreal, Cells, University of Montreal, mechanobiology

Cellular Seismology: Putting Vibrations on the Map

Scientists in Montreal develop a unique technique to map, on a scale of milliseconds, the elasticity of the components inside a cell.

Medicine

Science

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cancer immunotherapy, mechanogenetics, CAR-T cell therapy, Ultrasound

Researchers Develop a Remote-Controlled Cancer Immunotherapy System

A team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells.

Science

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Fungi, Aspergillus, Genomics, Energy, Environment, Bioenergy, Biofuels, Biotechnology, Industrial Applications, genes, secondary metabolites, DOE Office of Science

All in the Family: Focused Genomic Comparisons

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In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team led by researchers at the Technical University of Denmark, the DOE Joint Genome Institute and the Joint BioEnergy Institute report the first outcome from the large-scale sequencing of 300+ Aspergillus species.

Science

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Stress, PTSD, fracking, Wildlife Conservation, oil and gas drilling

Industrial Noise Pollution Causes Chronic Stress, Reproductive Problems in Birds

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A new study by CU Boulder researchers found that blue birds nesting near noisy oil and gas operations have hormonal changes similar to people with PTSD, smaller nestlings and fewer eggs that hatch

Science

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Metabolites, trigonelline, homarine, signaling chemicals, signaling mechanism, mud crab, Blue Crab, Estuaries, Estuarine research, Marine Aquaculture, Marine Biodiversity, marine signaling, Urine, Metabolomics, Oyster, Fisheries, Fisheries and aquaculture, Pesticides, Herbicide, Marine Ecology

‘Hide or Get Eaten,’ Urine Chemicals Tell Mud Crabs

Mud crabs hide for their lives if blue crabs, which prey upon them, pee anywhere near them. Pinpointing urine compounds for the first time that warn the mud crabs of predatory peril initiates a new level of understanding of how chemicals invisibly regulate undersea wildlife and ecosystems.

Medicine

Science

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Liangfang Zhang, Nanosponge, sepsis treatment, Endotoxin, proinflammatory cytokines, Macrophage

Macrophage Nanosponges Could Keep Sepsis in Check

Researchers at UC San Diego have developed macrophage "nanosponges"—nanoparticles cloaked in the cell membranes of macrophages—that can safely remove sepsis-causing molecules from the bloodstream. In lab tests, these macrophage nanosponges improved survival rates in mice with sepsis.

Science

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Physics, Robotics, Cells, Technology, Science, Machines, Cornell University

Physicists Build Muscle for Shape-Changing, Cell-Sized Robots

A Cornell University team has made a robot exoskeleton that can rapidly change its shape upon sensing chemical or thermal changes in its environment. And, they claim, these microscale machines – equipped with electronic, photonic and chemical payloads – could become a powerful platform for robotics at the size scale of biological microorganisms.







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