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Largest Study of Hispanics/Latinos Finds Depression and Anxiety Rates Vary Widely Among Groups

Rates of depression and anxiety vary widely among different segments of the U.S. Hispanic and Latino population, with the highest prevalence of depressive symptoms in Puerto Ricans, according to a new report from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). The researchers’ findings also suggest that depression and anxiety may be undertreated among Hispanics and Latinos, particularly if they are uninsured. The study was published online in Annals of Epidemiology.

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Recent Kidney Policy Changes Have Not Created Racial Disparities in Care

• After the implementation of a new payment system for kidney failure care and changes to dosing guidelines for anemia drugs, there were no meaningful differences by race regarding changes in management practices or laboratory measures among dialysis patients.

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Life

Law and Public Policy

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Non-Citizens Face Harsher Sentencing Than Citizens in U.S. Criminal Courts

Non-Americans in the U.S. federal court system are more likely to be sentenced to prison and for longer terms compared to U.S. citizens, according to a new study.

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Better Nursing Resources for Critically Ill Babies Could Improve Health of 7 out of 10 Black Preemies

In the first study of its kind about critically ill infants, a University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing investigation shows that an insufficient number of nurses and poor work environments are associated with poorer health of infants born in hospitals that care for disproportionately many black infants.

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Higher Risk of Heart Disease for South Asians in Canada

Findings emphasize the need to develop a standardized surveillance system for non-communicable diseases, such as CVD, cancer and lung diseases, by ethnic group in Canada

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Nursing Improvements Could Boost Outcomes for Underweight Black Newborns

An interprofessional study co-led by Jeannette Rogowski of Rutgers School of Public Health and Eileen Lake of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, has found that greater nurse understaffing and worse practice environments at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients contributed to adverse outcomes for very low birth weight infants.

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Science

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In Joslin Trial, Asian Americans Lower Insulin Resistance on Traditional Diet

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Why are Asian Americans at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than Caucasian Americans, and prone to develop the disease at lower body weights? One part of this puzzle may lie in the transition from traditional high-fiber, low-fat Asian diets to current westernized diets, which may pose extra risks for those of Asian heritage, says George King, M.D., Senior Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer at Joslin Diabetes Center and the senior author of the study.

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For Racially Diverse Patients with Disabilities, Increased Barriers to Health Care

It's well established that Americans with disabilities and those in underserved racial/ethnic groups face significant disparities in access to health care. Now, researchers are beginning to examine the unique patterns of health care inequalities experienced by racially and ethnically diverse patients with disabilities, according to a special October supplement to Medical Care. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

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Puerto Ricans Who Inject Drugs, both in the Northeast U.S. and in Puerto Rico, Among Latinos at Highest Risk of Contracting HIV

The study, “Addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic among Puerto Rican people who inject drugs: the Need for a Multi-Region Approach,” published in the American Journal of Public Health (on-line ahead of print, September 11, 2014) described the epidemic and the availability of HIV prevention and treatment programs in areas with a high concentration of Puerto Ricans, in order to provide recommendations to reduce HIV in the population.

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When Talking About Body Size, African American Women & Doctors May Be Speaking Different Languages

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African American women and their female children have the highest obesity prevalence of any demographic group and are more likely to underestimate their body weight than white women. Yet, according to new research from Rush University Medical Center, cultural norms for body size may prevent awareness among many African American women about the potential health benefits they and others in their cultural group might achieve through weight loss.

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