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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Racial Identity, Low Birth Weight Infants

Low Birth Weights in Blacks Tied to Racial Identity, Mom’s Age

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A UA researcher examines the role of racial identity and acculturation on the birth weight of black infants.

Medicine

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Lupus

Large Multi-Ethnic Study Identifies Many New Genetic Markers for Lupus

Scientists from an international consortium have identified a large number of new genetic markers that predispose individuals to lupus.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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African Americans, HAIR, k-12, Schools

WashU Expert: K-12 School Policies on African American Hair Are Discriminatory

The naturally curly texture of the hair of many African Americans is not something schools should be spending their limited time and resources regulating, says an expert on implicit bias and the law at Washington University in St. Louis.“Several school districts around the nation have adopted policies that prevent students from wearing their hair in braids, twists, dreadlocks and Afros, and even Afro puffs,” said Kimberly Norwood, the Henry H.

Medicine

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American Academy Of Dermatology, Dermatology, Dermatologist, Dermatology A to Z, Skin Cancer, Skin Cancer Prevention, skin cancer detection, Skin Cancer Risk, Sun Protection, skin cancer in people of color, skin cancer in skin of co, Skin Of Color, people of color, skin cancer in Latinos, skin cancer in African-Americans, Sunscreen, Melanoma, deadliest for

How People of Color Can Prevent and Detect Skin Cancer

With summer in full swing, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology are reminding everyone that people of all races and colors can develop skin cancer. Although people of color have a lower risk of developing skin cancer than Caucasians, when skin cancer develops in people of color, it is often diagnosed at a more advanced stage – making it more difficult to treat. The good news, say dermatologists, is that there is a lot people can do to protect their skin and reduce their risk of getting skin cancer, including melanoma, the deadliest form.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Society, African-Americans, Education, Racism, Discrimination, k-12, Social Issues, Diversity

Why Are Black Girls Disciplined More Harshly Than Their White Peers?

Medicine

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GW Cancer Center, GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Prostate Cancer, cancer disparities, African American health disparities, African American Health, Genetics, genes, tumor aggressiveness , Cancer

Genetic Variation by RNA Splicing May Lead to Tumor Aggressiveness and Drug Resistance in African American Men with Prostate Cancer

A form of genetic variation, called differential RNA splicing, may have a role in tumor aggressiveness and drug resistance in African American men with prostate cancer, according to research published out of the George Washington University Cancer Center in Nature Communications.

Medicine

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Retinitis Pigmentosa, hispanic health disparities, Hispanic, southwestern united states, Eye Disease, Genetics

Gene Mutation Linked to Retinitis Pigmentosa in Southwestern U.S. Hispanic Families

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Thirty-six percent of Hispanic families in the U.S. with a common form of retinitis pigmentosa got the disease because they carry a mutation of the arrestin-1 gene, according to a new study from researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health.

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American College of Physicians and National Minority Quality Forum Partner to Improve Quality of Care for African Americans with Heart Failure

/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The National Minority Quality Forum (NMQF) and the American College of Physicians (ACP) today announce that the CMS-approved ACP Genesis Qualified Clinical Data Registry (QCDR) now includes a performance measure for the treatment of heart failure in African Americans beginning with the 2017 Reporting Period for CMS' new Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).

Medicine

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supar protein , Kidney Disease, Kidney Failure, Nephrology, Blacks, Genetic Mutation

Catalyst for Genetic Kidney Disease in Black People Identified

Between 15 and 20 percent of black people carry a genetic mutation that puts them at risk for certain chronic kidney disease, but only about half of them develop the illness – a variance that long has puzzled researchers. Now a study has found that the gene mutation’s toxic effects require higher than normal levels of a protein called suPAR to trigger the onset and progression of the disease.

Medicine

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Health Disparities

At Academy Health: On the Front Lines of Equity and Payment Incentives - Preview

Three medical provider teams working with a variety of partners in urban and rural settings are using innovative payment and delivery system changes in an attempt to reduce disparities. Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Finding Answers (http://www.solvingdisparities.org) program, they will detail their experiences at a June 26 panel at the Academy Health Annual Research Meeting in New Orleans, LA. @FndgAnswers







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