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Why Glaucoma Develops, LASIK Eye Surgery, Stem Cell Therapy for AMD, and More in the Vision News Source

The latest research and feature news on vision in the Vision News Source

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Your Disease Risk, Substance Abuse Treatments, Comparing Lung Cancer Treatments, and More in the Healthcare News Source

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

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regenerative med

Penn Study on Super-Silenced DNA Hints at New Ways to Reprogram Cells

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Newly described stretches of super-silenced DNA reveal a fresh approach to reprogram cell identity to use in regenerative medicine studies and one day in the clinic.

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HSS Researchers Receive Grant for Clinical Trial to Improve Outcomes for Rotator Cuff Tears

A multidisciplinary team led by Scott Rodeo, MD, and Christopher Mendias, PhD, at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) has been awarded the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF) Clinical Research Grant in Cellular Therapy.

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pluripotent stem cells, Stem Cells, Hair Follicle, skin organoids, Organoids, skin, Epidermis, Dermis, 3D culture

In Scientific First, Researchers Grow Hairy Skin In A Dish

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Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have successfully developed a method to grow hairy skin from mouse pluripotent stem cells—a discovery that could lead to new approaches to model disease and new therapies for the treatment of skin disorders and cancers.

Science

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Inflammation, placental mammal, Implantation

When a Bad Thing Becomes Good: Was Inflammation Modified to Become Implantation in Placental Mammals?

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New research shows that inflammation was modified by uterine decidual cells to facilitate implantation in placental mammals. The results of this study will be presented at the annual conference of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in San Francisco, CA on January 5, 2018.

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Scleroderma, Stem Cell Transplant, Autoimmune Disease

Cross-Disciplinary Program Improves Surgical Outcomes for Older Patients

Compared to younger adults, older people have higher rates of complications from surgery. But many problems can be avoided by intervening with assessments and risk-reduction strategies before, during and after procedures.

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Characteristics, Performance, Physiotherapy, Secondary Lymphedema, self-care, Breast Cancer, Cancer, Rehabilitation Oncology

Lymphedema after Cancer Treatment – Special Issue of Rehabilitation Oncology Presents Research Update

Individuals who have been treated for cancer are at risk for a complication called lymphedema: swelling in the body region where lymph nodes were removed, causing pain and limited function. New research and insights on the management of cancer-related lymphedema are presented in the January special issue of Rehabilitation Oncology, official journal of the Oncology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

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Oncology, Hematology, clinical trial, Clinical & Translational Research, Dna Sequencing, Dna Profiling

Christiana Care to Offer No Cost Tumor Profiling and DNA Sequencing to Patients with Advanced or Rare Cancers

Christiana Care Health System is joining the Strata Precision Oncology Network to offer next-generation tumor profiling at no cost to patients with advanced or rare cancers. Based on the results, eligible patients will be matched to the best available clinical trials or most innovative therapy. The project begins on Feb. 1, 2018.

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Hepatitis, Small Pox, Mummy, DNA, Sequencing, Italy, Medieval, Archaeology

DNA Analysis of Ancient Mummy, Thought to Have Smallpox, Points to Hepatitis B Infection Instead

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Scientists have sequenced the complete genome of an ancient strain of Hepatitis B, shedding new light on a pathogen that today kills nearly one million people every year. The findings, based on data extracted from the mummified remains of a small child buried in Naples, Italy, confirm the idea that HBV has existed in humans for centuries.







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