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Newswise: Study: Eyes hold clues for treating severe autism more effectively

Article ID: 714628

Study: Eyes hold clues for treating severe autism more effectively

University of Vermont

In a new study, researchers demonstrate that assessment tools capturing implicit signs of word knowledge among those with severe autism can be more accurate than traditional assessments of vocabulary, pointing the way toward better inventions and potentially spurring much needed new research.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 714555

Glaucoma Research Foundation Accepting Preliminary Applications for 2020 Research Grants

Glaucoma Research Foundation

Preliminary applications for one-year Shaffer Grants in the amount of $50,000 are being accepted until July 15, 2019 through the Glaucoma Research Foundation website.

Released:
18-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Nancy S. Forster joins Glaucoma Research Foundation Board of Directors

Article ID: 714498

Nancy S. Forster joins Glaucoma Research Foundation Board of Directors

Glaucoma Research Foundation

Nancy and Pat Forster chaired Glaucoma Research Foundation’s 2019 Annual Glaucoma 360 Gala, raising a record $660,000 to advance glaucoma research and education programs.

Released:
17-Jun-2019 7:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Implanted Drug ‘Reservoir’ Safely Reduces Injections for People with Macular Degeneration

Article ID: 714310

Implanted Drug ‘Reservoir’ Safely Reduces Injections for People with Macular Degeneration

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a clinical trial of 220 people with “wet” age-related macular degeneration, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, collaborators from many sites across the country, and Genentech in South San Francisco have added to evidence that using a new implant technology that continuously delivers medication into the eyes is safe and effective in helping maintain vision and reduces the need for injections in the eyes.

Released:
13-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 714256

VISION COMMUNITY DRY EYE AWARENESS MONTH 2019 ACTIVITIES INCLUDE CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING AND SCREENING

Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO)

Dry eye disease is a global problem affecting more than 30 million people in the United States alone. The Alliance for Eye and Vision Research, in conjunction with Tear Film & Ocular Surface Society, will hold a Congressional Briefing and Screening entitled Ongoing Impact of TFOS DEWS II™ on Dry Eye Clinical Practice & Research, on Capitol Hill, July 10. The Briefing features a panel of experts who participated in the development of the Report speaking about its impact on clinical practice and research.

Released:
12-Jun-2019 6:05 AM EDT
Newswise: New Survey Highlights Growing Insurance Problem That Delays Sight-Saving Care

Article ID: 714257

New Survey Highlights Growing Insurance Problem That Delays Sight-Saving Care

American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

The majority of ophthalmologists in a new survey said that a cost-management tool required by health insurance companies is delaying or disrupting the sight-saving care they give their patients. The tool is called prior authorization.

Released:
11-Jun-2019 4:00 PM EDT
Newswise: How to Improve Care for Patients with Disabilities? We Need More Providers Like Them

Article ID: 714077

How to Improve Care for Patients with Disabilities? We Need More Providers Like Them

Johns Hopkins Medicine

It is common for patients to prefer seeking care from a clinician similar to them — such as of the same gender, ethnicity and culture — who can relate to their experiences and make treatment plans that work better for their lives. To meet these preferences from patients and improve quality of care, a diverse clinician workforce that matches the diversity in the general population is needed. However, when it comes to patients with disabilities, the chance of getting a clinician “like them” is extremely low, which may lead to patients’ reluctance to seek care or follow prescribed interventions and treatments. Meanwhile, without adequate scientists with disabilities bringing perspectives to patient-centered research, the ability to improve care for patients with disabilities is limited.

Released:
10-Jun-2019 8:00 AM EDT
Newswise: Children’s Brains Reorganize After Epilepsy Surgery to Retain Visual Perception
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Jun-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713775

Children’s Brains Reorganize After Epilepsy Surgery to Retain Visual Perception

NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Children can keep full visual perception – the ability to process and understand visual information – after brain surgery for severe epilepsy, according to a study funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health. A new report by Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, researchers from a study of children who had undergone epilepsy surgery suggests that the lasting effects on visual perception can be minimal, even among children who lost tissue in the brain’s visual centers.

Released:
31-May-2019 2:05 PM EDT

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