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Medicine

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age-related macular degeneration, AMD, Macular Degeneration

Fluctuations of Sex Steroid Hormone Could be Culprit in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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Gender-based differences may influence several ocular conditions, suggesting that fluctuations in sex steroid homeostasis may have direct effects on eye physiology and the pathogenesis of conditions like Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

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Study Advances Gene Therapy for Glaucoma

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In a study published today in the scientific journal Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kaufman and Curtis Brandt, a fellow professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at UW-Madison, showed an improved tactic for delivering new genes into the eye's fluid drain, called the trabecular meshwork. It could lead to a treatment for glaucoma.

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Science

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Duke University, Duke Health, Statistical Analysis, Baseball Players, Baseball Statistics, sports vision, perception and cognition, Athletes, Athletic Performance, Nike, sensory augmentation, vision training strategies

Vision, Sensory and Motor Testing Could Predict Best Batters in Baseball

Duke Health researchers found baseball players with higher scores on vision and motor tasks completed on large touch-screen machines called Nike Sensory Stations had better on-base percentages, more walks and fewer strikeouts -- collectively referred to as plate discipline -- compared to their peers.

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Why Glaucoma Develops, LASIK Eye Surgery, Stem Cell Therapy for AMD, and More in the Vision News Source

The latest research and feature news on vision in the Vision News Source

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Inattentional Blindness

Drivers’ limited capacity to process the myriad details they absorb could explain why they sometimes fail to avoid crashes with motorcycles.

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NEI-Funded Research Suggests Repetitive Strain From Eye Movement May Play a Role in Glaucoma

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Common, unavoidable eye movements may be a cause of glaucoma in people with normal intraocular pressure (normal-tension glaucoma), according to new research supported by the National Eye Institute. The findings suggest that over time eye movement strains the optic nerve, the bundle of nerve fibers between the eye and brain. The research may also explain why tension-lowering eye drops can improve normal-tension glaucoma. Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide and January is Glaucoma Awareness Month.

Medicine

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Glaucoma, Glaucoma Awareness Month, glaucoma prevention, glaucoma research, glaucoma surgery

Glaucoma Experts Available to Discuss Prevention, Treatments, Local Research

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Medicine

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science & liberal arts, Opthamology

Malcolm Gladwell Published in the Journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

In his bestsellers The Tipping Point, Blink and Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell writes about the unexpected implications of scientific research, urging readers to think different. In an editorial published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Gladwell offers another example of his stock in trade: To make medical students better doctors, send them to art school.

Medicine

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Lasik, Eye Surgeon, Eye Surgery, refractive eye surgery, laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, Nearsightedness, Farsightedness, Astigmatism

Are You Considering LASIK Eye Surgery?

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If you struggle with nearsightedness, farsightedness, and/or astigmatism, you probably wear glasses or contact lenses to help you to see. This can be frustrating, especially if you misplace your glasses or lose a contact lens. You’ve probably heard of LASIK eye surgery and may be wondering if the procedure is right for you.

Medicine

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National Eye Institute (NEI), National Institutes Of Health (NIH), Discovery, Stem Cell, Therapy, Eye Disease, Closer, Clinic, Age Related Macular Degeneration, AMD

NIH Discovery Brings Stem Cell Therapy for Eye Disease Closer to the Clinic

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Scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, report that tiny tube-like protrusions called primary cilia on cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)—a layer of cells in the back of the eye—are essential for the survival of the retina’s light-sensing photoreceptors. The discovery has advanced efforts to make stem cell-derived RPE for transplantation into patients with geographic atrophy, otherwise known as dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the U.S. The study appears in the January 2 Cell Reports.







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